How Would You Repair This Cast Metal Part? - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    I welded things up over the weekend. I used Hobart 3/32 nickel 55% rods at 70 amps AC.

    I sandblasted the part, then "U" ground the cracks (not "V" but "U") then slowly heated the part to 600F in my powder coat oven. Next thing I did was to fill a large metal pan with hot coals and ash from the wood burning stove and positioned the part in the pan of red coals. I used a C clamp on the part to keep it in position and to keep ground clamp away from the red hot coals.

    Filled the 'u' grooves and built the cracked areas up using multiple single passes. Peening the welds after each pass and alternating from one side welding a bead, then to the other side, letting things sit for a bit after each bead, then repeating till the area was built up to my satisfaction.

    I actually like the way the nickel rod beads welded/flowed. I had no difficulty striking or maintaining a steady arc/bead. I did dial the amperage in on a scrap piece of cast before I started on the vise part.

    When I was done welding, I just shoved the part deeper into the pan so it was buried in the ash and coals mix, and let it sit for about 20 hours till it was room temp. Did a little smoothing with the grinder but don't really care what it looks like. It's a vise.

    I have stress tested it with 2x4 in the vise jaws and me standing on the screw/handle (200 lbs) and no issues yet. As long as I treat it like a vise and not and ANVIL I should be OK. I like the 360* rotating feature.

    20 bucks for the rod and have plenty left over for the future, so I now have a 40 dollar vise and no longer feel intimidated by attempting to weld cast iron. I will do it again in a minute. If it fails, then no big deal, but I really feel the part is stronger than it ever was.

    Thank you to those who provided helpful and useful information.

    slide090.jpg

  2. #22
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    Any form of welding on cast iron parts will leave a martensite layer adjacent to the welded area. On some parts this will mean failure occurs quite quickly and on anything mission critical means that brazing is a better repair process if appropriate.

    TIG brazing is a repair process which works extremely well on things like cast exhaust manifolds and will succeed in cases where welds have failed.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by kd460 View Post

    then "U" ground the cracks (not "V" but "U")

    F
    i was just going to suggest that but don't have to now.
    i always brought the temperature down slowly using the torch. i don't have your patience but the coals, i would think, are better.


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