Not happy with new Pressbrake
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 90
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    363
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    161

    Default Not happy with new Pressbrake

    Okay, so the brand new Betenbender press brake showed up today, there're what appears to be a chain gouge on the bed that will need to be stoned down flush before putting the bottom die in.
    The upper die bolts to pinch the die won't tighten up, so I need to take a tap to the holes and chase the threads.
    The threaded holes that also hold the bottom die gouged into the tee slot.
    There's other Allen bolts for the front support arms that are missing... I hope this is not a reflection as to how the rest of the machine was made.

  2. Likes TFPace liked this post
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    10,290
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    17366
    Likes (Received)
    5372

    Default

    Unfortunately, I did post my did dis-satisfaction with your choice.
    I observed much of what you describe on a simple 4' shear I did the
    install for.

    I also suggested to you, a rebuilt Cincinnati, remachined, and with new controls.
    Last edited by digger doug; 01-10-2018 at 05:17 AM.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Hillsboro, New Hampshire
    Posts
    4,749
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1067
    Likes (Received)
    3265

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    Unfortunately, I did post my did satisfaction with your choice.
    I'm gonna read that as "dissatisfaction", cause otherwise I is confused...

  5. Likes Garwood, digger doug liked this post
  6. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    363
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    161

    Default

    I should be able to clean up these issues in a couple of hours, first I need to get a flat stone to fit down in the 1/2" groove.

  7. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Arizona
    Posts
    174
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5
    Likes (Received)
    76

    Default

    can you post up photos? Did the machine come with startup support and training from the factory?

  8. Likes TFPace liked this post
  9. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    10,290
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    17366
    Likes (Received)
    5372

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Milland View Post
    I'm gonna read that as "dissatisfaction", cause otherwise I is confused...
    ^%$#@! auto correct strikes again (I was batting 1000 yesterday eh ?)

    Fixed it.

  10. Likes Milland liked this post
  11. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    363
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    161

    Default

    Yes, the machine came with start up help, once I get it powered up they have a guy that will come in and spend part of a day going over things with me.
    I ordered the machine with a (5 station go to pro ) which if I understand it correctly will have a memory that will remember 5 ram depth programs and 5 back gage programs.

  12. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Se Ma USA
    Posts
    1,295
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    103
    Likes (Received)
    722

    Default

    You paid for a fully functional machine, not a brand new fixer upper. Make the setup guy do what needs to be done to your satisfaction. Yeah, finish tapping every freekin hole. Get the power there and leave the final connection for him. Read as much as you can about the machine and make the setup guy program and execute all movements of every axis. And if 5 steps only then a 5 step program.
    Set him up with all the sheet/plate metal he wants and make sure the grain is marked on all pieces submitted. Short pieces and 6 foot plus pieces

  13. #9
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New Jersey
    Posts
    445
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    9
    Likes (Received)
    141

    Default

    I agree, you paid for a new machine. I would document the problems and have the service guy fix it. This may sound stupid, but if you fix things, that's another way for the manufacturer to void a warranty.

    This tapatalk has been giving me a network error for a week again. First topic I have been able to get into.

    Sent from my 2PS64 using Tapatalk

  14. Likes digger doug, cranium, TFPace liked this post
  15. #10
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    198
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    15
    Likes (Received)
    42

    Default

    Make them fix it. Gouged parts should be replaced or the machine discounted appropriately. You want to make it clear from the beginning that they shouldn't screw with you so when you find something really wrong they are happy to buy the machine back.

    The only reason to buy new equipment these days is for functional performance guarantees from the manufacture or if what you need is simply not available in the used market.

  16. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Midwestern MN/Wi USA
    Posts
    1,258
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    70
    Likes (Received)
    332

    Default

    You are not happy with the new press brake....try buying a used one

  17. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    363
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    161

    Default

    As much as I'd like to make them do the repairs, I really want to take my time with it, there are sharp corners on the bed that I want to break to prevent us from getting cut when sliding the dies in and out, Chase the threaded holes with a tap and blow them out.
    I will also stone the bed down where it looks like the chain from a chain binder gouged it.
    I'm also going to start running the conduit for the #4 wires.

  18. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    minnesota
    Posts
    155
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    40
    Likes (Received)
    35

    Default

    Just doesn't seem right to spend that kind of money on a new machine then have to rework it before it can be put into service. If it was me it would go right back where it come from.

  19. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    10,290
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    17366
    Likes (Received)
    5372

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lars66 View Post
    Just doesn't seem right to spend that kind of money on a new machine then have to rework it before it can be put into service. If it was me it would go right back where it come from.
    "Made in USA" doesn't mean "Made any better"......

  20. Likes Pathogen, TFPace liked this post
  21. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    363
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    161

    Default

    I spent the day cleaning paint off the machined surfaces of the upper pinch clamp, chasing threads and breaking the sharp edges, now I need to clean the track of the lower die holder, the threaded holes used to center the die holder have burs where the drill and tap busted through.

  22. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    363
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    161

    Default

    Okay, I finally got all the power ran to the area of the press brake, cleaned all the surfaces, now that its powered up, I removed the wood blocks that it was shipped with between the ram and the bed, cleaned that area, installed the section pinch plates on the ram that hold the upper punch in place, ( I ordered it with what they call a safety tang) to hold the sectional gooseneck punch into place before it gets tightened and the groove is improperly machined on 2 of them not allowing me to install the punch, so now I have to box those up, send them back to the factory to have them machined.

    Another question, I understand that they need to put a little paint on the machined surface where the lower die sits so it doesnt rust traveling down the road, so I took a flap wheel on my high speed drill to sand the paint off, is it acceptable that the machining grooves are so coarse that I can feel them with my leather gloves on, some areas are smooth and some are not where it looks like they had to go back and hit the high spots, its definately not a consistant machined surface.
    When they talk about crowning dies and they use a .005 shim and I look at the machining texture which is easily .002 if not a little more, I'm left scratching my head.

  23. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    3,640
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3893
    Likes (Received)
    1815

    Default

    Sounds like it's still a pile of shit.

    Since being around a lot of precision sheet metal work I don't understand why anyone would buy a machine that cannot do precise work.

    I suppose it's different when a welder buys a press brake VS when a machinist buys one.

    The stuff you can do with a high end press brake with a good back gauge and a way to make custom tooling can really pay off.

    What you can't do with a low end brake can cripple you.

  24. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    363
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    161

    Default

    Garwood, I wasn't trying to go cheap, if I wanted cheap I would have went chinese, I wanted American made, the electrical components are american made, I went to the trade show and looked at the display model, I did searches on the computer and looked for complaints and found none, I did my best to find one with good quality, a company that has been around for several years so I can get replacement if needed.
    I paid additional for digital Ram and digital powered back gauge.
    On the flip side, I didn't want one that was overly complicated with a bunch of bells and whistles I didnt need.
    Hopefully once I get the bugs worked out I'll have the machine I was hoping to get.

  25. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    3,640
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3893
    Likes (Received)
    1815

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Portable Welder View Post
    I wanted American made

    The newest American made machine in my shop was made in 1967. We haven't made anything worth a shit for a very long time. Because of the cost of materials and labor here we cannot compete. Cannot compete!

    American companies specialize. We don't make commodity machines well here.

    What would the same money have bought you in a used Amada?

    If I was your potential customer I would rather see a slightly tattered 20+ year old Amada on your floor than a shiny new B-thing.

  26. Likes digger doug, Pathogen liked this post
  27. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    363
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    161

    Default

    Hey there Garwood, your a little late to the game, now ya tell me...


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •