Please Help Identify this joinery process.
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  1. #1
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    Default Please Help Identify this joinery process.

    Hi All,

    This is my first post in this sub forum. I mostly post in the CNC machining sub forum.

    I have a project that requires I join a SS tube to a SS cylinder. The material is 316SS or 304SS. I need to get a cosmetic joint like the picture. The spout is ~1" across the top. It looks like it might be silver brazed, but it's not my field so I'm not sure. The joint looks flawless. I would love to achieve it or find someone who can do it. I'm not sure what to ask for.

    Any help is greatly appreciated.

    Roger
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails spout-view-2-cropped.jpg  

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    How thick is that sheet metal? That will make a big difference in how its attached.
    What its used for also helps in making the decision on how to put it together. If its a stainless watering can then silver solder is fine, if its some high temp thingymawhatsit then silver solder might not be ok. Corrosive and Food service jobs dont like any kind of exposed seam for tiny bits of whatever to get stuck in or corrode through...
    If it sits as a lap joint then its fairly easy to Tig weld. If its a fillet weld then its a little trickier...

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    Quote Originally Posted by PlasmaOnTheBrain View Post
    How thick is that sheet metal? That will make a big difference in how its attached.
    What its used for also helps in making the decision on how to put it together. If its a stainless watering can then silver solder is fine, if its some high temp thingymawhatsit then silver solder might not be ok. Corrosive and Food service jobs dont like any kind of exposed seam for tiny bits of whatever to get stuck in or corrode through...
    If it sits as a lap joint then its fairly easy to Tig weld. If its a fillet weld then its a little trickier...
    The thickness of the example is .023" Actual part will be .032"
    It is not a high heat application. The watering can is a similar application. (I can't go into details due to a NDA in place)
    Not a food service product.

    The part is a prototype for a high volume consumer product. I would like to use similar process to the high volume process. I was also looking at furnace soldering/brazing as that would be a volume process. Not sure if either of these processes will leave that beautiful fillet as in the photo.

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    High volume that thin would be a good brazing job. As long as the joint design and fit are good you can end up with a sleek looking seam. Look into a vacuum or controlled atmosphere furnace and a brazing paste/ preformed foil.
    The peoples who make the brazing alloys should be able to help you pick the right filler and joint setup for brazing.

  5. #5
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    Fusion in Willoughby, Ohio will do it all for you.

    They will recommend a proper joint design, how to fixture it,
    And sell you the proper brazing materials.

    BTW, Joe Michaels wrote about a special food grade color matching
    silver solder used in the stainless fabrication shops.


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