Repairing void in cast titanium
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  1. #1
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    Default Repairing void in cast titanium

    I'm working on a 1911 pistol build and the frame, beavertail grip safety, etc. are cast titanium. There is a small void in the beavertail grip safety which I discovered yesterday. I'm going to paint the gun, so finish isn't an issue. The first thing that occurred to me was either paying someone to tig weld the spot, but then I decided that just putting a drop of epoxy in it would be far easier and simpler. Too much trouble for the tig welding. The void is on the outside where the web of your hand goes when you grip the pistol. Sanding it flush would be very easy.

    Another thing just occurred to me now. How about brazing or silver soldering? Strength isn't an issue. Just filling the small void. I have an oxy-acetylene torch. I understand I can't oxy-acetylene weld titanium, but how about brazing or silver soldering?

    Someone else mentioned JB Weld. And then I found this:

    Versachem 47909 Titanium Epoxy

    Other ideas?

    Thanks,
    Jay

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    devcon titanium.
    you can silver solder ti, but it requires inert atmosphere- and cleaning it in inert atmosphere. solder wont really stick to the oxide layer.

  3. #3
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    If you're not going to weld it, epoxy it.
    IF you have even the slightest doubt and think that you *Might* want it welded at some point, get it welded Before you put any goop in it. Your welder will HATE you if you epoxy it first, and if they are worth their salt, will turn it into a much bigger spot digging the JBweld out to get a good weld.

    From what you are describing, this is a 10 or less min job with nothing more than a normal gas lens and a machine with post flow. The filler wire is going to be a bigger issue. You need 1 drop from a .035 filler. Good luck finding anyone that will sell you less than a pound...

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    Order Titanium Round Bar Grade 2 Online,Diameter: 0.125" you might forge a little down first, saves buying a pound of filler at ouch prices.

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    Hi birdus:
    Send it out to a laser welder.
    Titanium is easy to weld...this sounds like a 15 minute repair.
    Laser welding gives you great control, almost no heat affected zone, microscopic weld placement accuracy and tiny welds that can be made so precisely that you can stone them off afterward and never even know they're there.

    Attached are two photos of a mold repair I did about 5 years ago.
    The welding wire is 0.005" diameter.

    Cheers

    Marcus
    www.implant-mechanix.com
    www.vancouverwireedm.com

    I'd do it for you but it would be a royal pain in the ass to get it across the line into Canada.
    Find yourself a local mold welder...there are lots on the west coast of the US.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails cavity-defect-welding-wire.jpg   micro-welding-repair.jpg  

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  7. #6
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    One caution: Don't use ordinary fillers like J-B Weld if your finish needs to be heat cured. There are high temperature fillers used in powder coating that will stand the heat.

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