Replacing a burned out resistance welder - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Feb 2011
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    I did find a Birdsell type 130 on craigslist somewhat nearby. It looks like the California based company is defunct, but I think it's a pedal action and looks reasonably compact, and it's cheap (3 big points on my shopping list). Dunno about completeness, functionality, or serviceability yet.

  2. #22
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    Nov 2010
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    I did a google search and it looks like a 4.6 KVA unit, unless they made other power levels. If the 2.5 KVA was good enough then odds are it will work well.. I suggest asking if they can power it for testing, bring some wrenches and a few files and some scrap in the thickness you need to weld. If they can set it up have them do a test weld. and then break the weld to make sure it is working well.. If you can set it then do your test welds.. I would not rank that unit as being very high end. The arms are a little small, so you won't have the rigidity of a 1 1/2" or 2" arm unit.. Rigidity is a quality I'm always looking for, because a stiffer machine makes smoother more reliable welds.

    Most of the older spot welder companies are gone, they generally existed as process equipment makers, so they made all sorts of machines for factories.. There are new names in the business but they are generally very expensive.

    It is difficult to wear out a larger spot welder, but I have had one less that great unit out of 9 that I bought over the years. Most of the time it is just a bad connection on one or more parts. Often times people put sealant on the tapers which is insulating and prevents the welds from happening. If the tips leak water you fix it by slightly reaming the taper to remove damage not by using sealant. Use a file for tip dressing not sandpaper, aluminum oxide on copper does not help welding quality.

    My area is not great for finding welders of any kind, even still if I search once a week on craiglist facebook and ebay, I'll find two or three decent ones a year. These days I've mostly stopped looking because I have all the units I need.

  3. Likes M.B. Naegle liked this post

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