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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattiJ View Post
    What grade of tungsten you use?

    And gray weld sounds like you have bad gas, bad connections or you are just n00b with TIG. Super-duper easy to get gray welds if you just started welding stainless.
    Getting totally bright weld bead without any polishing is possible but you need a bag of tricks and good technique for that. Shades of yellow to blue would be more common and easier to archieve.
    I use 347 and get rainbooooows

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    img_1081.jpgimg_1080.jpg

    This is some practice I did on a stainless steel fork. Where the filler rod is used the bead is grey but if I did a fusion weld then it looks a little better. I used about 100 amps with as little weld time as it takes to get a bead to form. Post flow is 3 seconds (max on the machine is 10 sec). I taped up the junction between the cup/back cap and torch body to rule out a leak in that spot.

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    Quote Originally Posted by taiwanluthiers View Post
    img_1081.jpgimg_1080.jpg

    This is some practice I did on a stainless steel fork. Where the filler rod is used the bead is grey but if I did a fusion weld then it looks a little better. I used about 100 amps with as little weld time as it takes to get a bead to form. Post flow is 3 seconds (max on the machine is 10 sec). I taped up the junction between the cup/back cap and torch body to rule out a leak in that spot.
    Sounds to me that you pull the arc too long or have the electrode set too far from the cup if fusion welds are ok but when you start playing around with filler it gets ugly. Spend few bottles of argon training and spend rest of the free time watching Jody's welding tips and tricks YouTube

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    I tried having a shorter arc, but I don't really know how short so I make it as close as I can, but I am dipping the tungsten into the puddle all the time, and also if it's too close (close enough that the weld arc turns deep blue) the weld steel seems to jump to the tungsten and end up contaminating the tungsten.

    I have electrical tape covering both the junction between the cup and the back cap, and this fixed the balling up issue. I tried experimenting with leaving the tape off the back cap (so I can change tungsten) and the tungsten balls up. So there's a leak somewhere, because I used incompatible parts. I hope it will be better when I get the WP26 torch.

    But I'm getting better result making the arc shorter, but I can't stop dipping the tungsten. Instead of grey beads when the filler is introduced, I'm getting bluish/yellowish (but shiny) beads. HAZ is still kinda big though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by taiwanluthiers View Post
    .............................................
    HAZ is still kinda big though.
    Depending upon the design of your machine, you might be able to change the balance between penetration and cleaning action. My Miller Syncrowave has a balance control that can vary this function.

    More penetration gives a smaller HAZ area while less penetration gives a larger one.

    Some older machines that are straight transformer-driven do not have the balance function so welding is done 50-50 between cleaning and penetration based on pure sine wave operation.

    My Miller is transformer-driven with a hybrid square wave that permits some variation in balance up to about 60-40 either way while modern inverter machines have great capability in this function.

    Good luck. Sounds like you are coming along.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Newman109 View Post
    Depending upon the design of your machine, you might be able to change the balance between penetration and cleaning action. My Miller Syncrowave has a balance control that can vary this function.

    More penetration gives a smaller HAZ area while less penetration gives a larger one.

    Some older machines that are straight transformer-driven do not have the balance function so welding is done 50-50 between cleaning and penetration based on pure sine wave operation.

    My Miller is transformer-driven with a hybrid square wave that permits some variation in balance up to about 60-40 either way while modern inverter machines have great capability in this function.

    Good luck. Sounds like you are coming along.
    Balance between cleaning and penetration is only used with AC when welding aluminium alloys.

    Pulse settings have some effect on HAZ and penetration but its really for fine-tuning after you can handle the basic process.

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    How far is your tungsten sticking past the end of the cup? Do you have a gas lens?

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    My machine is DC only so I can't really do much about AC balance. You don't weld in AC when welding steel anyhow. Maybe I can control penetration by varying how steep I grind the tungsten?

    I stick out the tungsten as little as I can get away with, on a #8 cup that's about 1/4" to 1/8" stickout. I don't have a gas lens, just using standard cups.

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    Arrow

    Quote Originally Posted by MattiJ View Post
    Balance between cleaning and penetration is only used with AC when welding aluminium alloys.

    Pulse settings have some effect on HAZ and penetration but its really for fine-tuning after you can handle the basic process.


    Well aware of that.

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    Try to keep tungsten at 1/8" stickout or less, this will also help you from dipping it into the puddle. Sharpen tungsten to look like a pencil tip. If it has a tiny flat on the end that is good. Also be sure the grinding is done lengthwise, not around it. Keep torch as close to 90º to work as possible, this and the short stick out will help keep air from getting sucked into the gas under the cup. Also set the flow to aprox 12-15 cfh. To little or to much can be problem with air getting in.

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    I think you have also got too much current for the metal thickness. You are burning a long way into the metal. Ideally, you should get a molten pool in about three seconds. A shorter arc will also reduce the melting of the top edge. For that type of joint it is quite acceptable to rest the cup on the metal to control the length of arc until you get enough practice to do it freehand (and don't forget it between one job and the next ).

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rand View Post
    I think you have also got too much current for the metal thickness. You are burning a long way into the metal. Ideally, you should get a molten pool in about three seconds. A shorter arc will also reduce the melting of the top edge. For that type of joint it is quite acceptable to rest the cup on the metal to control the length of arc until you get enough practice to do it freehand (and don't forget it between one job and the next ).
    1 amp per .001 thickness of material (double for aluminium)...there's massive undercut in those pics lol

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    img_1088.jpgimg_1087.jpg

    I did some practice... lap joints. I kept the stickout to a minimum and used the cup as a guide for me to keep a consistent arc length.

    I felt like I had some undercut so I reflowed the weld beads... it looks good (I hope) but still not shiny. 3mm mild steel using 304 stainless filler rod. 100 amp, 5 second post flow, other than the tungsten having a little blackening at the very tip no tungsten erosion.

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    I would bump your amps up to 120ish assuming you have a foot pedal and focus on moving faster. It is counter intuitive but using more amps so you can move faster results in less heat put into the part.

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    Not to hijack the thread but one thing I've always wondered about is if there is any simple way to test the UV protection of an auto-darkening helmet.

    Although they are supposed to meet the various specs I've always wondered about the possibility of either factory defects or degradation with age.

    I may be worrying needlessly but we only get one set of eyes and even small extra amounts of UV can cause or aggravate cataracts.

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  18. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scottl View Post
    Not to hijack the thread but one thing I've always wondered about is if there is any simple way to test the UV protection of an auto-darkening helmet.

    Although they are supposed to meet the various specs I've always wondered about the possibility of either factory defects or degradation with age.

    I may be worrying needlessly but we only get one set of eyes and even small extra amounts of UV can cause or aggravate cataracts.
    Asked the eye doctor a few years back...screwed up his face and said "what's an auto darkening helmet ?"

    No more going to see that doctor.....


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