TIG weld/braze W Silicon Bronze filler - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mud View Post
    This is my stash, I don't know what's available now.

    Attachment 260895
    Oh shit, naturally, it’s lumiweld from alumismiths, of corse!! ( just kidding, but not a lotta help there..!! Haha!) thanks..

  2. #42
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    Like I said before, thanks for the suggestions. BTW, it's NOT hollow on the bottom like someone thought here. It's 7/8" thick and solid. I was a welder by trade for nearly 50 years, I've gas welded, soldered and brazed, along with just about all processes there are, TIG, MIG, SMAW,SAW, IR welding, hot air welding, from 100?% x-ray to orbital and diametric. From 1/4" electro-polished tubing to 120" diameter pipe. I just haven't welded cast iron (well maybe once 40 years ago) nor do I have experience identifying it. I was told this was cast iron before I received it, so I went along with the game. The very first suggestion I made to the owner instead of welding it was to pin it. I even drew up a 3D model of the fix. I was going to mill a 'pocket' in the leg about 5/32" deep, which would be mirrored on the top and bottom. Then cut a couple of steel plates that size to fit into the top and bottom pockets. Drill holes in the top plate and countersink the head then tap the holes in the bottom plate. Sort of like a big nut. J.B. Weld everything, meaning the broken faces and under the plates and let dry for a few days. Then mix some more J.B. Weld and float it on top of the top recessed plate. It will settle nearly flat, I've done it before. Once dry, do the bottom plate the same way. Then I can sand it down flat once everything is dry and power coat it. J.B. Weld is capable of withstanding the heat. You wouldn't even be able to see it was a repaired. Lots of work but I was game. Then "I" started reading about welding and/or brazing it (being told it was cast iron) since it would be a lot quicker ... and here we are today. <g>

    Sorry for the troubles ...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 2019-07-12_20-40-10.jpg   2019-07-12_20-40-51.jpg  

  3. #43
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    Same shit, pretty much, said it's improved, thats some old looking packaging. They have it at HF, probably they're only USA made product in the store, $18.00. Only reason I went there is I needed it immediately and couldn't find it anywhere else. It was to shorten the depth of a small deep blind hole in a really thin part , the hole was like .2" dia x 2.0" deep hole. It was 6061, no way to TIG it, I would've brased it, but I didn't want to get it hotter then I had to. The stuff is called Alumaweld, it was easy to use with O/A torch, and is pretty damn strong considering it's more of a solder then anything else, but did the job. Hindsight, I wish I would've just brazed it, I'm sure the material was hot

  4. #44
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    Hot enough to do it.

  5. #45
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    It's stronger then solder I'm sure, but it isn't brazing and sure isn't welding. I say I wish I would've just brazed it because the cost of brazing rod is much cheaper and I got it hot enough to do it, although tgat was not my intent. Thankfully no distortion and the stuff can be machined with success, milled, drilled, tapped, etc..

  6. #46
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    ... good old Alumaweld.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 101061361.4tgc9kb5.alumcan.jpg  

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smokedaddy View Post
    I asked the same question to Mike Muggy using his 77 electrode and he said it should be fine. Just curious, in your situation, did you only weld about an inch then peen the weld?
    yes. using cast iron filler rod and o/a. bringing the heat down slowly then after it got close to room temperature you could hear the ping from across the room. loosened the bolts on my fixture cured the problem. don't know nutten about any muggy stuff.


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