Tips for bundling rounds for sawing?
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  1. #1
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    Default Tips for bundling rounds for sawing?

    All,
    Occasionally I have to do small production runs and this 1 by 1 saw cut stuff sucks.

    Material is stressproof, diameters 1" - 1-1/2", 2-4 at a time.

    The same has hydraulic downfeed, coolant, and plenty of HP but I cant figure out how best to bundle them. If it were cold-rolled I'd weld the ends, but this material doesn't like welding. (Although it may suffice for this task?)

    So what are some trick you use to keep bundled cuts from eating saw blades?

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    Squeeze between 2 big Vblocks. I've done 12+ lengths between a pair of 4.5" Vblocks.
    I've Tigged Stressproof. It isn't strong, but it welds.

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    It'd probably strong enough to keep the lengths even. Maybe that and some chain type vise grips.

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    tigerstop, foot pedal, one at a time.

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    This may be so very crude but...zip ties pulled down tight with vise grips
    Bob

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    shrink wrap has worked well for me in the past. i just wrapped the whole length tight and had no issues. it’s easy to remove once things are cuts also.

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    Quote Originally Posted by climb-101 View Post
    shrink wrap has worked well for me in the past. i just wrapped the whole length tight and had no issues. it’s easy to remove once things are cuts also.
    I tack the ends of stressproof all the time, it welds plenty good enough to hold while sawing. I use a hose clamp or three to stack 4 aluminum bars for sawing. works a treat.

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    Weld 'em...............do it all of the time. 1144, 12L14, 303SS.........they all don't "weld", but they weld well enough to hold them together for sawing.................

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    If I'm cutting a lot, I try to slide a piece of square tube over it to hold the pieces from rotating when moving between cuts.

    If your cutting more then 2 pieces, welding is the only real option. You can also use shrink wrap and then very heavy packing tape throughout the length. Or painters tape then packing tape, just to keep residue off the material.

    If you cut rounds say 2w x 2h, you have to be very careful as the clamp doesn't hit both pieces of material. I use a piece of hard rubber at the clamp to help grab each stacked piece.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

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    I found an easy way is to use home brew "V" blocks made by welding heavy angle to heavy flat then thread old leather belting between the rounds only where clamped.

    For the leather belting I look for old leather work belts every time I visit a second hand thrift shop. I have a box full. It's great for all clamping needs when you want the stock to hold firm without making marks.

    Also keep a few heavy angle and flat bar drops out of the scrap bin in case we need a quick "V" block.

    Walter

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    I cut a lot of .625 round stock into short pieces. Hyde-Mech automatic H 14A. I removed the moving jaw faces and made some "L" jaws that are almost as wide as 5 bars at the bottom of the "L". Upper leg of the "L" is slotted for adjustment with longer screws in the stock jaw holes. Keeps all 5 round bars side by each and can adjust for other sizes if needed. More important is that almost any other thing I cut on that saw can be done with those jaws in place. They are just high enough above the table for the .625 stock to slide through.

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    We use the chain vice grips all the time here. You get the added benefit of having handles to pull the bundle with also.

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    I don't know what it's called, but the black steel strap for shipping works.

    Once you have a series of straps on them, the vise has something to push against.

    Having a top clamp bar helps too.

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    I make top and bottom bars with holes spaced so the pieces just barely fit between the clamping bolts. I've done up to 15 1" EMT tubes at once before. - metalmagpie


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