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Thread: Welding ar400

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    Default Welding ar400

    I'm using 250 preheat .045 7100 ultra filler
    Root pass looks good though I would share
    20180928_094928.jpg20180928_095023.jpg20180928_095932.jpg

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    On the fill passes if you move your shield from the other side and clean as you go you can really save some time and just kinda spiral the weld on up, just watch your inter-pass temps if it matters with that filler - material Real easy to get too hot on a heavy but small weldment like that that does not have all that much attached metal to dissipate the heat.

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    Thanks for sharing the pictures. I have a couple of questions, just out of curiosity and always trying to learn from others.
    Why is the gun at 9:00 instead of pointing down at 12:00? Is that just for the root pass?
    How do you dial in (control) the spindle rotation speed that slow and reach the sweet spot rpm? I'm assuming that's how you are doing this.

    Thanks, and post more photos when it's completed or part way through as well.

    Gus

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    He is probably running it at 9:00 so the weld is a verticle up weld with the part rotating down in front of the mig gun. This is the best way to make sure any impurities in the weld are floated to the top of the puddle and mixed in with the slag.

    Great idea on cleaning and welding at the same time

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    Yes vertical up on the first 5 passes then up to about 11 O'clock for the rest
    My thought on cleaning is a hinged (finger) that will run in the grove and knock the slab off
    20180928_101813.jpg20180928_115358.jpg
    Know all I need to do is flip and weld the other side
    And then do it all 7x more
    Then figure out how to machine a rail wheel profile into them after I bore/face/and drill a bolt pattern...

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    "Cleaning as you rotate"......32 years ago, I was working on very similar parts only 3' around...my job was to take a die grinder with a burr, and chase out the bad welds, that the machining uncovered.

    fun job, always got them in the morning, so the leetle chips that spun up and over
    me, landed down my back, and where there all day.

    Had enough one day, so walked over to where they were welded (swam upstream)

    Found a guy doing pretty much what is pictured, and one is running as we talk.

    Needle scaler in hand, he rattles off the slag as it comes around.....

    Yup, he made more bad welds with me talking with him, never stopping
    the job, and welded right over the slag......

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    With this wire you can weld over the slag in some joints
    Not this one though 20180928_135305.jpg20180928_132149.jpg
    Running pretty much all out now!20180928_141512.jpg20180928_142233.jpg

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    Killer setup! What's your thoughts on residual stress, any risk of cracking or other stuff when the profile is finished and in use (as a rail wheel?)?

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    Why fluxcore ?

    Why not solid wire in Spray mode ?

    No slag to clean off.

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    7100 ultra is dual shield wire, the slag should just fall off if set right. I love that wire, it looks like I am switching to esab 10x? now as the local praxair stocks it, seems to run the same as 7100 ultra.

    Are you using .045 or 1/16" at that high power?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob F. View Post
    7100 ultra is dual shield wire, the slag should just fall off if set right. I love that wire, it looks like I am switching to esab 10x? now as the local praxair stocks it, seems to run the same as 7100 ultra.

    Are you using .045 or 1/16" at that high power?
    Coulda....Shoulda.....Woulda.....

    Many times it don't, and you've got to be there with something to clean it all
    off, even in the edges.

    I have noticed that flux core when applied on multiple passes (part getting hot)
    the slag doesn't want to fall off as freely than a single pass, that the slag
    cracks off upon cooling.

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    Spray mode has always sounded cool but I have no experience and this shop has no equipment for it

    As far as stress goes PREHEAT and I'm welding this large joint unrestrained

    Its esab.045 7100 ultra at about 35 volts and 750 ipm wire feed that little Miller won't do much more
    Now if I had a linde 600 and some.062 dual shield...
    Back side and the rail profile
    20180928_132129.jpg20180921_055658.jpg

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    Watch the temperature in the flange. You don't want to anneal the AR400 and lose its properties.

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    I really enjoyed the sharpie note on the print about the weld joint prep! That SO looked like something I'd do.

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    Find it kinda surprising there actually making it out of 2 bits and that bit were the weld is is right were track running wheels get the most fatigue.

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    My temperatures are definitely on the high side but I'm willing to risk some annealing
    The sharpie stuff was me trying to teach a coworker a little
    But it is per drawing I get tired of arguing with engineers
    I totally agree about the one piece idea but..^
    Chip control is a bit of a problem with this stuff so far

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    Quote Originally Posted by adama View Post
    Find it kinda surprising there actually making it out of 2 bits and that bit were the weld is is right were track running wheels get the most fatigue.
    Goodson sells crankshaft welding equipment and wires, they apply a different wire
    (with different characteristics) in the corners of the crank.

    As far as the OP job, I suspect the weld deposit has more elongation
    than the surrounding material.

    But yes, it would be good to hear some more on this aspect of the job.

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    My machining plan is to face,bore and possibly do some roughing on the profile then on to a power rotary table and mill the profile in a Bridgeport eztrak
    I know it's not the right or fast way but it's all I've got as far as cnc
    Any end mill ideas?

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    That profile is a lathe job. You will want to find a different career befor you finish milling AR400 on a Bridgeport. What do you have for a lathe? There are hydraulic tracers that would turn a good lathe into a good machine for your job.

    Even without a tracer I'd profile that manually on a lathe before I'd use even a suitably sized mill.

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    We have a old 27" American lathe that is camping on a boring job 20180928_102744.jpg
    I've seen a large jet pump nozzle machined on a vertical boring mill there was a template and a dti that he moved out and down then back to zero?
    I've never done this and I don't really remember how it works


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