Welding Carbide chips to give grapple teeth friction
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  1. #1
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    Default Welding Carbide chips to give grapple teeth friction

    Okay guys, I'm working on an attachment of a front loader at a junk yard, this attachment has forks on it, the operator comes up to the front of the car after the hood is removed, the forks sit on top of each fender, then another unit pivots down into the engine compartment, squeezes together grabbing the engine and rips the engine transmission out of the car.
    I have built the fingers up a few times over the years, however, they become smooth as they wear.
    So I have seen hard face that looks like it has chips of carbide in it... and thought this would be a good fit.

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    So where and what kind of rod is this, what is the process used to apply it... I'm open to suggestions.

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    Broco Rankin torch rod

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    I have used something like that, brazing rod with carbide chips in it. Probably been almost 30 yrs ago, so no idea what it was or where to get it.

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    [QUOTE=Portable Welder;3501866]Okay guys, I'm working on an attachment of a front loader at a junk yard, this attachment has forks on it, the operator comes up to the front of the car after the hood is removed, the forks sit on top of each fender, then another unit pivots down into the engine compartment, squeezes together grabbing the engine and rips the engine transmission out of the car.
    I have built the fingers up a few times over the years, however, they become smooth as they wear.
    So I have seen hard face that looks like it has chips of carbide in it... and thought this would be a good fit.[QUOTE]

    operating that front loader sounds like a fun job! as to the hardfacing, just an everyday job for a stick welder, maybe Stoody 21 rod? haven't run it myself, but it looks like a good bet from their website. the carbides in these deposits usually are formed in the weld puddle, from carbon, and chrome/titanium/tungsten. look for maximum hardness, no need for "machinability" or "multi-pass" capability.

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    I don't use the stuff myself, so can't give you a specific electrode recommendation, but this is a fairly standard thing. At your FNWGS (or on the Web), ask to thumb through the hardfacing sections of the rod suppliers. There are several types of hardfacing, and carbide hardfacing is one of them. A very quick check on the web shows that Esab/Stoody have several electrodes of this type, and I am sure they are not alone.

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    Broco Rankin makes rod that has chunks of broken carbide in a nickel alloy matrix. The rod can be purchased with different sizing of the carbide. I think the chunks may be as large as ,18 or .25. One use for large grades is for facing down hole cutting tools for removal of lost or broken tooling.

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    Tungsten Carbide Inserts for Downhole Milling|Dynacut – Dynalloy I have purchased thru these guys. usually have to call them tho their website isn't that great for purchasing through. 10 lbs was like 400.00

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    Exceedingly common related to down hole tooling for such as oil wells

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    I have used the bronco rankin rod just the other day its really easy to use.
    Before I had that rod, I would put old carbide inserts in a heavy rag and smash them up with a hammer and braze them on my underground tooling. It worked well, although not the safest way to get carbide chunks. The rod works nice.

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    Thanks for the replies, I'm going to look at the Bronco Rankin Rod.

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    Can't Carbide Bob set you up ?
    The price for scrap carbide is down, this might be a win-win for both of you.


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