welding a high shock area of cast iron
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  1. #1
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    Default welding a high shock area of cast iron

    The connection of my fly wheel on my OBI press to the actuator cracked the entire way around.

    I have never welded cast iron and from my research, it is not an easy thing to do.

    One of the methods that seems the most secure discussed on the Lincoln site is to drill and tap the crack around the circumference and leave about 1/4" of the steel screw exposed and weld it and the cast iron.

    Also, from that site, it appears that Tech Rod 55 is my best choice.

    Any suggestions/ideas?

    Thanks
    Chris
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails bliss-fly-wheel.jpg   obi-press.jpg  

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    Lock and stitch... otherwise if I wanted this repair to last inedfinitely removing the flywheel, boring out the hub and making a new connection hub out of a higher grade steel and bolting the lager cast iron flywheel to it would be bullet proof. A guy like Abom has the tools to do this like childs play, but obviously you would need a serious lathe/boring mill to do this work.

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    Wow...be the shits to see that big honker snap off and zoom across the shop floor. I have stuck lots of cast iron together, usually by brazing, but what I believe you need is a truly mechanical repair..just like 'kustomizingkid' said.

    Stuart

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    to the right of the crack is another joint.

    my guess is the shaft has not cracked, the joint has slipped, might be a tapered friction fit?

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    Quote Originally Posted by johansen View Post
    to the right of the crack is another joint.

    my guess is the shaft has not cracked, the joint has slipped, might be a tapered friction fit?
    Let's hope Johansen is right, this is an unusual failure otherwise (like, why didn't it go rolling off somewhere?). I'd start with a thorough cleaning and paint removal of the area, and get a real understanding of what's gone wrong.

    If it does come down to a thermal repair, I think I'd lean towards pinning in some form, then brazing. It might not be a bad idea to find an industrial engine repair shop in your area, they would have dealt with diesel crankshaft repairs and have techniques that should work for you.

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    Too much paint but it looks like this is more than one part.

    Ring to right looks to have corner and on left looks like a flat interface inside.

    Looks like torn paint between the 2.

    Would suggest as others and add cleaning area to bare metal in place via wire wheels in die grinder to see what is really there.

    If a solid chunk then as others suggested make new inner hub out of suitable material with a good mechanical interface for support and alignment then after it is fitted drill and tap for suitable size and grade bolts to secure it.

    Also consider key to lock against rotation.

    One could consider this had a breakaway for overload protection that did just that.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337Z using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by atomarc View Post
    Wow...be the shits to see that big honker snap off and zoom across the shop floor. I have stuck lots of cast iron together, usually by brazing, but what I believe you need is a truly mechanical repair..just like 'kustomizingkid' said.

    Stuart
    That happened at a low cost sweat shop supplier in Michigan, killed one or two.


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