Which welding standard to start with? Which is most flexible?
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  1. #1
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    Default Which welding standard to start with? Which is most flexible?

    In my previous company, we had welding procedures following AWS and also EN/ISO. I am starting a new workshop and need advice on which standard to stick with for now to give the most flexibility - i.e. reduce the number of weld qualification records to produce the widest range of welding procedure specifications.

    Any and all advice would be highly appreciated.

  2. #2
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    What are you welding? If you're dealing with products that "require" a certification you'll often find that the
    buyer will state what level of certification they require. Since you're not in North America I suspect that the
    EN/ISO standard will be more common...

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    * I am just the welder, I dont have to deal with what certs get chosen, I just have to pass the test.*

    Go about it the other way, Instead of looking for the "lowest" certs on the totem pole, Look at the "higher end" certs.

    Even if you're making paper weights (AWS 9.X, non critical sheet metal), structure your cert's/process to flight critical aircraft certs (AWS D17.x). Pick and choose which parts of the cert process to actually spend money on(NDT tests, tracing base/filler metals, mechanical testing, ect ect...) and transfer the rest of the info you need to the cert the customer requires.
    Skip the parts that cost a ton of money/wouldn't apply, do enough of the tests to be happy that your process/procedures are making strong enough parts, and use the more strict codes to fill in the blank on the less strict codes. IF you can pass a test to 17.X standards you have passed standards for a Bunch of " lesser" codes and just need to fill in different blanks on the paper work.

    I dont know if any of that makes sense to a business, but if I was in charge of doing certs for a shop, that's what I would do from my experience as the guy who has to pass the tests. Take a handful of Hard tests to produce results that cover mountains of cake work that you KNOW is far better than needs to be.

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    Generally ASME IX will supersede any other welding code. One test 2" XX wall allowed me to weld anything 1" or larger, another test for small bore and there wasn't anything I couldn't touch.


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