welding table ideas?
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  1. #1
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    Howdy,
    Starting to build a welding table, so far all I have is the perimiter frame for the top finished. My question is, I want to put some runners front to back and end to end under the top to add support to make a nice solid work area. How would you go about doing this and making sure your "sub" frame for the top doesnt end up in a twist or uneven? I dont have any kind of a datum to use for a flat surface. By that I mean, the floor in the shop is way uneven and I dont have any kind of bench suitable for the task. I'm looking for ideas on a way to "jig" this so I end up with as flat a surface as reasonably possible. Any ideas? Surely some one has "been there, done that"
    Thanks
    Jim

  2. #2
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    Jim, Start out with the thickest plate you can get. I have 3 tables in my shop. Cut your legs, make a square frame from 3x3 or so angle, weld it together. Weld the top to the angle frame with as few welds as possible to keep from warping it. It won't fall off it just needs to keep from moving. Also see which way your plate is warped (if it is). When you weld the angles together put the long sides out that way you can use c clamps on the edge for future welding projects...Bob

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    I guess you already got some of it put together but we made two of these for ourselves and then ended up making alot more for other companies.
    The top is 1" plate, blanchard ground flat and the shelves were laser cut then the edges were bent up on our brake. The plate may seem like over kill but that thing is staying flat for a while


  4. #4
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    Heres another vote for as thick as of a plate as u can muster. If your goign to make it out of a thinner material...maybe weld down some Steel "T" sections, (upside down T) and then weld your sheet/plate on top of these. Just an idea...may get ya close?

    a 1/2" plate cant cost much more than runners/sheet...?

    NK

  5. #5
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    Thanks for the hints, I also read some of older post about this same thing. The perimeter frame for the top is 3'X7", made from 2x2 heavy wall square tubing. I dont do any heavy stuff, was thinking of using maybe just 1/4" plate, but wanted to "truss it up" underneath. I'll have to check some prices on plate, we only have one dealer here and they are very greedy. recently bought bought 1 stick 0f 1-3/4 HREW tubing to make some repairs to a race car rol1 cage, 32 freaking dollars!!! Steel prices ar horrible here. I would like to use heavier, likely cant afford it. Blanchard grinding would be nice, steel is to heavy to ship 300 miles to someone who can do it. Living in the boonies has its price.
    Jim

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    I have a table 5x10 1 inch thick. I do alot of welding for machine shops whick must saty flat. But....this table WAS NOT CHEAP!!!

  7. #7
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    Another solid vote for going absolutely as heavy as you can afford / or lift.

    We made one a while ago, out of 5/8, good for most jobs, however on really picky stuff, you need to shim parts.

    If you are having to go ahead with 1/4", just take your time when tacking it together. Use a decent straightede, checking side to side, and pull straigt with clamps or whatever needed to keep it straight.

    I built a 3hp router table out of 1/4, and broke the 2 opposing sides at 90* to help it lie flat, but with that you also get a git or edge roll, A big part of how fussy you need to be depends on what you are doing with it.

    Tim

  8. #8
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    Build it on sawhorses and shim/level as you go to get the frame flat and square. If the legs are rigid and the supports flat, the plate is easy to clamp and tack into place. I just built one this way at work and it's flat to 5-10 thou or so over 8 feet as checked with a long straight edge.

    I can also tell you how not to do it because my first table was built in reverse - I put the top plate on the horses and built the frame/legs upside down. Sounded good but the middle of the table had a 1/4 sag after I flipped it over. If the frame is square, then the top will be also unless you get a really bad piece of plate from the supplier.


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