What process for truck body cab welding? - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chip Chester View Post
    I get the feeling there's more to the story. I believe the adjuster is the decisionmaker, not the agent. If you're truly on solid ground, sue the agent.
    Yup, like a police report......

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    I agree with others that I wouldn't write off the insurance angle too soon. There may be a grace period to add a new vehicle, or if you told your agent to add the vehicle and they didn't. If the agent messed up, it may be covered by their insurance.

    This actually happened to my Uncle on his house. His agent didn't set up the coverage correctly, so the agent's E&O policy had to pay what the sub-par homeowner's policy didn't.

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    That's gotta be a 20k bill right there...ouch

    and to answer your question, you dont run beads when doing body work, you tack. .025 solid core, low amps and move around don't stack em.

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    "B" pillar bent, and OP said the frame is bent.

    If brand new truck, the insurance company would probably total it out.

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    Watch this and you'll get an idea of how it's done.
    Body Weld Robots - YouTube

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spud View Post
    Mig welding?
    Tig welding?
    Flux Cored shielded gas?
    Flux Core Gas ?
    Nuke it from orbit. It's the only way to be sure.


    I remember back in the 70's, there was a local agent who was pocketing premiums and not writing policies. He went to prison.

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  9. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spud View Post
    So if I understand you right, the body's frame is Only spot welded? No continuous welding of the entire length of the seam?

    I assume, hot-rodders / custom car builders use Mig when they chop the roof and reattach it?
    Yeah most of the welding in the body will spot welded, you might find the odd bit of mig in plugs or short runs.
    The custom work is a different ballpark, chopping a roof for example is more involved than you might think, lots butt joints, fabing sections to make it work. Mig / Tig or if your old school gas all work. Full seam welds put in spot spot spot fashion to keep distortion in check.

    Honestly your trucks not that bad. The bed/body and chassis are all separate arnt they? If youre not in a hurry, S/H doors, front wing, bed and a body cut if required (always cutout more than youd ever need). If you get real lucky and find parts the same colour, it should take around 3-5 days depending how much damage there is under the doors and whos doing it.

    This gives a jist, the guy knows what hes doing.

    Watching him kinder makes me wana pick up a hammer again

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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    Yup, like a police report......
    The agent made a mistake , not just in putting my old car on the insurance policy, but in also not getting comp. I have always had comp. insurance, and been with this agent for many years. When I went with the new Insurance agency, the agency the agent made the mistakes.

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    So at my Auto-Body welding class at Tech school, I did MIG welding , but will be doing Oxy this week.

    Questions:
    I used .035 copper coated steel wire for MIG.

    The machine is a Miller XMT 350 cc/cv. Do not recall the model # of the Miller wire feeder.
    The machine can run dual guns. 1 side has the aforementioned 0.035 wire and the other side has 0.045 Flux Core wire.


    • Typically what all wire sizes do Auto-body guys use?
    • What size and type of wire for chassis/frame of a 1/2 ton, 3/4 ton and 1 ton pickup? What about for a Model A ford frame?


    What wire speed and volts are you all using for pickup truck frames, classic car frames ?

  12. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Demon73 View Post
    Yeah most of the welding in the body will spot welded, you might find the odd bit of mig in plugs or short runs.
    The custom work is a different ballpark, chopping a roof for example is more involved than you might think, lots butt joints, fabing sections to make it work. Mig / Tig or if your old school gas all work. Full seam welds put in spot spot spot fashion to keep distortion in check.

    Honestly your trucks not that bad. The bed/body and chassis are all separate arnt they? If youre not in a hurry, S/H doors, front wing, bed and a body cut if required (always cutout more than youd ever need). If you get real lucky and find parts the same colour, it should take around 3-5 days depending how much damage there is under the doors and whos doing it.

    This gives a jist, the guy knows what hes doing.

    Watching him kinder makes me wana pick up a hammer again
    So if full seam welding, then lots of tack welds every 2-3 inches? Or replace tack welds with spot welds every 1,2 or 3 inches?
    Resistance spot welding will require lap joints ?

    Is heat related distortion the reason for using tack or spot welds and forgoing full seam welding ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spud View Post
    The agent made a mistake , not just in putting my old car on the insurance policy, but in also not getting comp. I have always had comp. insurance, and been with this agent for many years. When I went with the new Insurance agency, the agency the agent made the mistakes.
    Agents carry insurance for when they screw up. You should file a claim for the accident damage with your agent.

    obligatory disclaimer: IANAL, etc., etc., etc.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spud View Post
    So at my Auto-Body welding class at Tech school, I did MIG welding , but will be doing Oxy this week.

    Questions:
    I used .035 copper coated steel wire for MIG.

    The machine is a Miller XMT 350 cc/cv. Do not recall the model # of the Miller wire feeder.
    The machine can run dual guns. 1 side has the aforementioned 0.035 wire and the other side has 0.045 Flux Core wire.


    • Typically what all wire sizes do Auto-body guys use?
    • What size and type of wire for chassis/frame of a 1/2 ton, 3/4 ton and 1 ton pickup? What about for a Model A ford frame?


    What wire speed and volts are you all using for pickup truck frames, classic car frames ?
    Aren't these questions you should/could be asking your instructors?

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  16. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by triumph406 View Post
    Aren't these questions you should/could be asking your instructors?
    I did. He said 0.035 and maybe 0.030. But different folks do things differently. So I was curious as to what others are doing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spud View Post
    I did. He said 0.035 and maybe 0.030. But different folks do things differently. So I was curious as to what others are doing.
    I dont remember using anything else than 0.6mm wire with argo shield lite.
    When seaming sheet spot tack every 2-3 inches, spot, move to next tack, spot and so on till the seam is full. Anything heavier than sheet have at it nd run beads. Just make sure youre hot enough.
    If in doubt search youtube, in sure theres plenty on there to set you right.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Demon73 View Post
    I dont remember using anything else than 0.6mm wire with argo shield lite.
    When seaming sheet spot tack every 2-3 inches, spot, move to next tack, spot and so on till the seam is full. Anything heavier than sheet have at it nd run beads. Just make sure youre hot enough.
    If in doubt search youtube, in sure theres plenty on there to set you right.
    So sheetmetal = tacks only? even if filling the entire seam with welds?
    What are the downsides and upsides to tack welding with either MIG or TIG versus resistance spot welding every few inches or the entire seam?

    And is the cab superstructure of a pickup considered sheetmetal? The cab frame that the doors attach to.

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    Honestly, take one of the doors of and strip it down and have a go, welding thin metal and especially for repair is nothing like txt book values for clean new metal.

    Joining auto body work and getting it back to a good finish takes more than a welding course and knowing the settings, some point you need to gain some experiance, either practice on scrap or practice on the real thing, but doing body work is very very different to structural welding.

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  22. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spud View Post
    So sheetmetal = tacks only? even if filling the entire seam with welds?
    What are the downsides and upsides to tack welding with either MIG or TIG versus resistance spot welding every few inches or the entire seam?

    And is the cab superstructure of a pickup considered sheetmetal? The cab frame that the doors attach to.
    The type of joint is situation dependent. If youre sectioning a piece in you want a butt joint at the section point (or a lap joint if youre in a hurry or dont know what youre doing). Replacing standard manufacturers spot welds youd use mig plug welds.

    On your truck theres no upside I can see for a Tig unit other than you getting seat time in with Tig.

    Two general types of body. Unibody and 'separate body and chassis'. The term chassis or frame can get used for heavy sections of a unibody but for me, when I hear 'frame' or 'chassis', especially from a US perspective, I think of a separate chassis, all else is sheet metal. Your truck I think is separate v and chassis I think, id class everything from the floor up as sheet metal.

    Some videos below, dont read the comments for christ sake.

    Butt joint:-
    (average)
    Nice work!

    Heres a video showing a Lap-Butt and Plug joints. I dont like it much tbh lol, but its shows the joints.
    Bench Top Welding | Fix My Hot Rod - YouTube
    The adjustments id make to the plug joint is start with base metal and roll out catching the edges of the top sheet.
    The butt joint is okay but if you ran like across shallow curve section like say a bottom of a door its gonner go doink!

    Best to get out there and just practice some, you have to adjust as the situation needs which only experience can teach. If youre gonner try and tackle this yourself its asking a lot of a noobie, be nice to have someone with an idea looking over your shoulder.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Demon73 View Post
    , be nice to have someone with an idea looking over your shoulder.
    The OP needs about 10 opinions before he'll do anything, so he'll need a circle of at least 10 people looking over his shoulder before he starts his first weld.

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