When would you use "welding glasses"
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    Default When would you use "welding glasses"

    I noticed these when I was browsing McMaster:

    McMaster-Carr

    My first thought is, wouldn't you just get a burnt face? Are they for working around other people that are welding but keeping a safe distance yourself? For that matter, what is the distance where your eyes are not safe but your skin is?

    Pardon the ignorance - I've been welding for a long time, but only by myself in my own shop.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Labrat View Post
    I noticed these when I was browsing McMaster:

    McMaster-Carr

    My first thought is, wouldn't you just get a burnt face? Are they for working around other people that are welding but keeping a safe distance yourself? For that matter, what is the distance where your eyes are not safe but your skin is?

    Pardon the ignorance - I've been welding for a long time, but only by myself in my own shop.
    How long have you been gas torch welding?

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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    How long have you been gas torch welding?
    Got me. Now it's so obvious. Welding without an arc did not occur to me.

    Does anyone still gas torch weld instead of just using it to heat and cut?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Labrat View Post
    Got me. Now it's so obvious. Welding without an arc did not occur to me.

    Does anyone still gas torch weld instead of just using it to heat and cut?
    We use it for casting repair. You can TIG it too, but some parts I find go together better when you can get the whole area glowing hot and keep it there.

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    I was a welder in the army. Yes, they actually had an MOS for that. 44C20 What a joke! Mostly I welded hand rails at the mess hall and 52 flag poles. Anyway we called them flash goggles. To protect your eyes from other welders. And of course; gas welding/brazing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Labrat View Post
    Got me. Now it's so obvious. Welding without an arc did not occur to me.

    Does anyone still gas torch weld instead of just using it to heat and cut?
    Jewelers. Goldsmiths & Silversmiths. Artists in metals & glass. Lamp glass workers. Blacksmiths - forge welding wants good eye protection, too, and it helps if you can see what is going-on, see also "didymium" glasses/goggles.

    Those among us who are simply comfortable with it vs crude rude, and messy arc.

    I have heard rumours that TiG is kinda neat?



    But wot the hey. Easier to hire somebody who is already better at it than I have time or inclination left to bother to learn.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Labrat View Post
    Got me. Now it's so obvious. Welding without an arc did not occur to me.

    Does anyone still gas torch weld instead of just using it to heat and cut?
    Now you've let out your age.
    I hate torch cutting because it changes the hardness of the cut area.

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    All this cute safety stuff looks great in the catalogue,until it channels stinging sweat into your eyes and blinds you .

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    Quote Originally Posted by Labrat View Post
    Got me. Now it's so obvious. Welding without an arc did not occur to me.

    Does anyone still gas torch weld instead of just using it to heat and cut?
    Zen and the Weld Puddle

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    Quote Originally Posted by Labrat View Post
    For that matter, what is the distance where your eyes are not safe but your skin is?
    The short term consequence of a arc flash to a eye versus the long term exposure to arc light on skin.
    Your question is going to require the brightness level for the equation.

    The inverse square law. Does it apply to arc light? Arc light, arc bright, where art thou arc tonight ...

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    I gas weld 2 stroke tuned pipes.

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    I actually do a lot more gas brazing then welding but on occasions gas welding is very handy. A good set of goggles is important.

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    Also handy around plasma tables. They also make flip-up glasses. Let's you flip the shaded part up when you're programming, then flip it down when you have to check on the machine.

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    You should be wearing shade 5 glasses or goggles when using oxy-acetylene for heating, cutting, and brazing too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Labrat View Post
    Got me. Now it's so obvious. Welding without an arc did not occur to me.

    Does anyone still gas torch weld instead of just using it to heat and cut?

    nobody brazes anymore? I like gas welding for thin stuff, like thin walled tubing etc.

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    Quote Originally Posted by fciron View Post
    You should be wearing shade 5 glasses or goggles when using oxy-acetylene for heating, cutting, and brazing too.
    Yes, shade 5 for O/A work you are doing yourself.

    Those shown are shade 3 and are useful in a welding shop for casual exposure. Its not just the arc, but the reflection of the arc from walls and windows. If you've never been in a shop with dozens of arcs lit at once you may not understand.

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    The last time I was welding I blew up the one appropriate size cup I had so was fighting to get a job done in aluminum and kept contaminating the tungsten.

    DAMN if I didn't yank up the helmet about five times to take a glance at the gear too soon and stared right at a white hot tungsten burning my eyes in the process.
    Now THAT got me thinking I need some tinted safety glasses under the helmet and I was wondering about welding glasses for this.
    Last edited by Trboatworks; 09-22-2021 at 06:08 PM.

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    I do lots of gas welding, heating and brazing. Those glasses would probably work but I use goggles instead. They work fine for everthing but TIG and Stick.

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    I have a pair that I use for gas brazing and welding. They are also useful after I go to the eye doctor and they dilate my eyes.


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