300 HP milling cut
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 29
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Iowa
    Posts
    10,492
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3616
    Likes (Received)
    4266

    Post

    Watch the video, 24" dia cutter, 18" wide, .75" DOC, etc.
    http://www.mmsonline.com/articles/0105ex1.html
    JR

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Roscoe, Illinois
    Posts
    1,508
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    47

    Post

    I ran this machine a few times before Ingersoll changed hands. The company that bought it is a tool steel foundry in Pa. Our test ingots were either d-2 or 4140. Cutting at 300 hp the inserts didn't last very long. Chips came off orange and if they stayed on the table under the rail, the oil in the return trough could catch fire. Finally Ingersoll had to change the type of oil used for the hydrostatic ways.
    Cat 60 taper tool and a right angle attachment to go along.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    peekskill, NY
    Posts
    24,131
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    4372

    Post

    Nice. Basically porn for metalworkers. [img]smile.gif[/img]

    Watch carefully at the end of the cut, and
    you can see the broom being used to clear the
    chips ignite a couple of times, on the left
    hand side of the cutter, behind it.

    Jim

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Posts
    5,095
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    8
    Likes (Received)
    823

    Post

    I always enjoy watching Ingersoll demo their inserts at trade shows. Nothing like in the video, but they get your attention.

    They take blocks of steel and do operations with their various insert drills and cutters throwing red hot chips and sparks that us mere mortals can only dream of. Of course, the fact that they're doing the cutting on a big hunking 50 taper Mori might have something to do with it.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Granada Hills, CA
    Posts
    498
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Post

    I want one.......will that fit on a bridgeport?

    Nick

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    northfield ct usa
    Posts
    602
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2
    Likes (Received)
    3

    Post

    wow and i thought i was realy removing metal when i had that 10 inch dia carbide cutter mounted on the spindle of my horizontal mill, but the way my garage is i had a great fear of fire from a hot chip in the clutter so i backed off on the cuts after a few close calls. and then later i managed to have a hunk of slag wipe out a whole bunch of the odd, ground in place, carbide inserts so i dont have it anymore, but i had only paid $1.50 for it it did alot of cutting before that on my 5 hp cincinatti. that cutter actualy would make the machine bog down a little, something no cutter i ever had in the horizontal spindle did, heck the time i got stupid with a large hole saw and twisted the tangs off a morse taper holer the machine didnt even change tone just all the sudden the hole saw stopped turning!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    3,242
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1803
    Likes (Received)
    798

    Post

    HOLY MOLY BATMAN!
    BANG, ZONK , WHAP
    I want one!
    DOug

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Vicksburg, MS
    Posts
    4,931
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    30
    Likes (Received)
    259

    Post

    Nice. Never mind the machine, the weight in chips they cut off probably costs more than I make in a month. I loved the shot of the smoldering chips. I didn't see any coolant there, I am assuming that was done dry? Was that just for the demo? In production why would they not use a flood collant system of biblical size?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    So. Cal. 33.61N 117.66W
    Posts
    389
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Post

    Let's see, what size VFD would I need to run one of these? Now, assuming I'll need to downrate the VFD to run off single phase...what size cables will I need to run into my garage?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Bremerton WA USA
    Posts
    10,659
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    40
    Likes (Received)
    4168

    Post

    300 lb of chips a minute? Here's where a big apprentice with 24" biceps and a size 5 hat comes in handy with his shovel. On this machine a chip converyor is a must.

    When I was 22 years old apprentice and my chest was still above my belt it was all I could do to keep ahead of a 50 HP machine working full time shoveling and hauling chips. We had 24" concrete carts we hauled them in and when full of 6's and 9's the tires woud squash almost flat and the heat would blister the paint.

    This Ingersol must have had a real ship conveyor something like the track drive for a tank.

    Scalped ingots and consinuous casting are reasons fine steels are so expensive. It costs a bunch of money to full anneal a 20 ton ingot, machine off 10% of the weight to clean metal, then re-heat it and roll it to merchant stock. But the metal is certianly clean and fine. It's been many years since I've run into included scale or pipes machining plate or bar stock.

    I recall Jack Neimi once machined a big flat steel plate on a floor mill cutting many pockets in it for sonar transducers. The material was behaving strangely (it didn't bong or clang normally when suspended from the crane and knocked with the plate clap wrench) but Jack went on anyway to discover a large blister in the metal like a de-lamination in cheap plywood. It was lined with scale and later exploration revealed it to be about 3 ft x 4 ft shaped like West Virginia.

    Apparently the ingot from which the plate was rolled was cropped too tall and it included a hunk of the "pipe" - that portion in the top center that feeds the lower part of the ingot with liquid metal as it solidifies from outside in after pouring.

    This episode caused every piece of plate from that manufacturer in the system to be inspected. Huge plate fiasco of 1968.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Linwood, Ma USA, the center of the known universe
    Posts
    274
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Post

    At my real job we have two Ingersoll horizontal bed millers 100 hp spindles. Typical cut with 16 inch cutter was 750" deep 16 ipm 12" wide, rpm about 90. Facing and matching ends on die blocks that weighed anywhere from 1 to 100 tons. Chips would fall down into a conveyor that was usually filled with oil and we would have several fires a day. Worse part was that the operators platform was directly above the conveyor. After facing and matching we would cut the shank which is 2" deep and 8" wide, using a 7" cutter with inserts that are 2" long (Greenleaf). First cut is 1.900" deep about 4 to 6 ipm. Chips so hot you could almost see through them.
    I hated that job because all that cutting was done without coolant. My employer is not too smart about coolant, they would prefer not to use it, $$$$. The job was so dirty with all kinds of stuff floating around in the air, due to the heat of the cut, you had to wear a filter mask to run the job, it sucked to say the least. In that video they are not using coolant either but that was probably for clarity during the taping of said video, I hope.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Roscoe, Illinois
    Posts
    1,508
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    47

    Post

    There is no coolant on this machine. The inserts are hot enough that if they were hit with coolant they would shatter. The cuts were heavy enough that you really couldn't get enough fluid to do any good. Removing chips meant pushing them off the table into large holes in the floor next to the columns. The conveyors were 4 feet wide chains that lifted chips directly up into rail cars for return to the furnaces at the other end of the facility. Chips came off about six inches long curls. It was fun to run for a little while, then it was just like any job shop- make chips, move the part, set up another one make more chips. Ingots were held on the table by magnets and side crowders.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Roseville, CA
    Posts
    3,858
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    26
    Likes (Received)
    16

    Post

    WOW - Watched the video. What can I say. Brute American horsepower at work.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    3,242
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1803
    Likes (Received)
    798

    Default

    Reviving a long dead (but oh so worth it) post:
    Unfortunately the link is dead.
    Does anybody have another link to this vid?
    I love watching it, and showing it to the unbelievers.

    Thanks,

    Doug.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    near Rockhampton, Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    5,498
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    439
    Likes (Received)
    2046

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by doug925 View Post
    Reviving a long dead (but oh so worth it) post:
    Unfortunately the link is dead.
    Does anybody have another link to this vid?
    I love watching it, and showing it to the unbelievers.

    Thanks,

    Doug.
    I have it saved on my hard drive somewhere... But it is on youtube I think...

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Lincoln, NE
    Posts
    334
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    5

    Default

    can't seem to find that, and I'd really like to see it.
    anybody got a link ?

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Louisiana
    Posts
    425
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    141
    Likes (Received)
    240

    Default

    In for link

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Washington
    Posts
    5,094
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    171
    Likes (Received)
    1439

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    2,055
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1061
    Likes (Received)
    903

    Default

    Here is another question-Whiuch is faster, milling plate on a beast of a machine like this or grinding it on a high horsepower grinder?? Our largest grinder now is 250 h.p. and my new one will be 300 or 350.

    With the grinder I put the plate on the table, turn the magnet on and start grinding. At the end of the cycle wash the table down and my filtration system does all the work.

    On a mill like this, unless you have it set up with magnets, there is alot of fixture work top do. Then after every part start shoveling the chips you did not get as the machine was running.

    I see alot of spindle downtime here.

    No doubt this machine is pretty darn amazing.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    lone jack mo
    Posts
    376
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3
    Likes (Received)
    18

    Default

    My thanks to Finegrain!
    I did not see it on you tube on my search.
    Thanks for the link!


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •