300 HP milling cut - Page 2
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 29 of 29
  1. #21
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    South Central PA
    Posts
    13,321
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2086
    Likes (Received)
    3275

    Default

    Cash - do you have a video of that operation? I'd love to see it.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    near Rockhampton, Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    5,482
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    438
    Likes (Received)
    2036

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cash View Post
    Here is another question-Whiuch is faster, milling plate on a beast of a machine like this or grinding it on a high horsepower grinder??

    I assume it comes down to cost not speed... And to work out the costs you also have take into account not just the cost per amount of metal removed, but also the cost of the machine... A large verticle surface grinder is not very versatile compared to a mill....

    If you were just facing off large slabs all day every day then the large surface grinder would probably win out.... But if you have to mill parts to other shapes then the mill would win out..

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    442
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    1

    Default

    I was at the Ingersoll facility many moons ago - right before their unfortunate demise. I was attending a cutting tool school next door as well as looking into the possibility of partnering with them on the 2nd gen Hexapod.

    I heard that this facility was boarded up - is this true? I heard that Ingersoll Milling Machine has been reorganized under German ownership and that they are still making the big gantry machines like the one in the video.

    Does anybody know what is the current status is of that facility/Ingersoll in the USA?

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    223
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    8

    Default

    New link to 300hp cut video. No baby cuts in aluminum here.

    YouTube - Heavy Cutting on Machining Centre

    Tom Lipton

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Bremerton WA USA
    Posts
    10,659
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    40
    Likes (Received)
    4162

    Default

    Yup. I set fire to many a broom and scorched many a wood block floor myself back in the day. We had no 300 HP machines so we had to make do with those with 100 HP and less.

    My nephew worked at a steel mill as a millwright. He told me the two big ingot scalping mills used to bust up inserts by the boxload and these were big expensive inserts 1 1/4" square and 3/8" thick. He brought home a couple with some good corners on them. The edges were sharp, that is, as ground and unhoned. We had a talk about keen edged inserts for roughing in steel. I told him of how the steel and especially the mill scale would crumble the cutting edges and how a small radius makes the caarbide insert corners more resistant to damage much like the radius on the edge of a sidewalk.

    I honed a couple of the good corners with what I thought were suitable radii and sent them back with my nephew. He must have talked to the right people because he won a $150 bonus - which he didn't share - the rat. He bought beer and pizza for his gang instead. He did tell me they could now get about an hour out of a set of honed corners meaning if they didn't bust any they got a full shift out of the eight corners per insert. Pretty good for scalping scaley forgings.

    Honing corners of inserts is an old trick we all learned from a carbide guy in the '60's. It was common knowledge when I was on the tools. Why isn't info like this being passed on?

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Sharon, PA
    Posts
    437
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    12
    Likes (Received)
    181

    Default

    The last time I was in that place they used big hydraulic clamps to grab the part, no more straps and jaws. They use magnets on some of the other mills, maybe even that one now. They have a rotator that will pick up and flip over a 100,000 forging with the push of a button. They now process stuff up to 160,000 pounds. They used to regularly break 1" chains rolling over forgings. I've broke 3/4" chains rolling stuff like this but never a 1"! Their new mill has two vertical heads with one offset behind the other to take even a wider path than the one in the video. The chip conveyor is something like 5 feet wide. They take off about 1 inch per side and remelt the chips so grinding is not practical nor economical. Funny thing is that cutter uses LSE inserts, which are a tried and true Ingersoll design. Since Ingersoll is now just another "Wall Street" oufit they don't make those inserts anymore but other carbide companies still do. Using the typical "big box" model most of the big carbide companies now play the game where they discontinue proprietary inserts after 5 years, especially Ingersoll. That may be ok with a 3" face mill. But when you have to buy 4 new 12" face mills so they can make a bunch of money, it sucks! The insert cost to cut one of those forgings can get to be over $1,000!

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    2,054
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1059
    Likes (Received)
    902

    Default

    Well my machine is for sure not the 300 HP mill, but it is as close as I will get. We have taken 3/16" deep cuts about 12" wide and only pulled about 30% M/L. I would like to get out to Elwood Specialty Steel someday to see the 300 HP Ingersoll they have.

    I have some Video from my Instagram Page, sorry about no sound here, phone was jacked up. Next videos I will have sound.

    The Kinetic Co., Inc. on Instagram: “This is about a 3/16 deep cut.
    #ingersoll
    #toosteel
    #makingchips
    sorry about no sound- have to reset my damn phone...... 😖😖😖”
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails ingersoll-milling-machine.jpg   ingersoll-plate-mill.jpg  

  8. Likes Blazemaster, Screwmachine, macds, cpifer3 liked this post
  9. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Oklahoma City, OK
    Posts
    3,917
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    681
    Likes (Received)
    1686

    Default

    Thanks Cash. Between your huge grinders, ZK's gear hobbing and the guy running several King VTL's at once, my IG feed is stocked with great content.

  10. Likes cash liked this post
  11. #29
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    West-Central Illinois, USA
    Posts
    1,176
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1876
    Likes (Received)
    525

    Default

    That’s a nice machine Cash! I’d kinda like to see the front end of this cut to see the engagement. If it was getting close to 70% it’d be pretty high horse…

    I used to dislike deep slab milling with a vengeance...



    Good luck,
    Matt

  12. Likes cash liked this post

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •