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  1. #21
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    adammil1...

    Is this an old tank you are trying to get a few more years out of? or new, and want it to last forever?

    The best precaution against pressure vessel failure due to rust is daily draining, and , as has been said, periodicaly take the time to actualy look at it.

    Ther are materials to both clean and coat the inside of the tank, but they are a bit trick to get right. 3M makes a fuel cell coating that i have used, works good, also the POR line (find them used in Auntique cars alot) Depending on the size of your reciever, cleaning can be chemical, or aggregate based with a lot of tank shaking.

    Not to be disagreeable... but lining the inside of a tank (its what I do ) DOES offer an incresed level of safety. This is by eliminating, or extending the time for dangerous oxidization to occur. If the tank is new, and clean, you can use several epoxies. "slosh and pour", just like the fuel cell coating. YES, an imperfection in the coating will result in localized pitting, however that is (as Matt said) more along the lines of "predictable failure mode" as opposed to "catastophic failure".

    If you are trying to resurect an old , leaking tank, this is not a viable solution, make it into a BBQ, and go get a new one.

    Tim

  2. #22
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    I too have seen the aftermath of an 80 gallon explosion. It was on a second story loft in a buddies garage and it took out the floor, roof and part of the wall. I am going to see if he has any photos.

    My 80 gallon vertical rarely gets any attention. About once a year (if I remember) I drain the tank. I know that's not often enough. There is always a little rusty color to the water. I have myself wondered about adding a little oil or some other "additive" to help combat this. Since the rust would most likely be on the bottom and my air discharge is halfway up the side I couldn't see any interference problem.

    Thanks for the reminder, I'll drain my tank today.

    Don't they inject alcohol or something in the air tanks on trucks with air brakes?

    SCOTT (fabricator - wanabee machinist)

  3. #23
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    methyl alchohol or methyl hydrate is used in air brake systems, as well as fuel systems, but not just for rust control, it is used as a de-icing material. it is true they will absorb water, but daily reciever draining is a req't on vehicle mounted air systems.

    Adding oil will only make the inside of your tank yuccky, and contaminate your air. The oil will float on top the water, and although it may reduce the amount of oxygen available for corrosion, rust nodules will still form on the inner surface. The oil will become air / water entrained (white miky sludge) and thus contain oxidants.

    The photo below is typical of bellow surface rusting, each of the pits are about 1/8" or so accross. This is from about 20' below the liquid surface.

    I find the easiest way to deal with this is 1) filter and pre-cool the air if possible, and 2) install a solenoid valve to open for a few seconds either daily when power goes off, or every few hours if you leave your comp running 24/7.

    Not an air reciever, but a friend of mine had his household HW tank let go all around the bottom weld. took out the staircase and ended up in the attic... very messy indeed.

  4. #24
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    I have a 30 gal tank for my compressor which suit my needs for all except my glass bead cabinet. With that the compressor never stops but keeps up. The drain on the botton of the tank is 1/4 pipe so I necked it up to 2" x 2' on one end and on the other end put a 90 deg down angle to 90 horiz 1/4 again with a ball valve. Confusing? It all fits under the tank, and the 2" x 2' pipe will collect about 3 cups keeping it outta the tank! I bleed it every now and then and theres no rust, I've had this compressor almost 15 yrs and run the balls off it! you should also put a water separater down stream to keep the air tools dry!

  5. #25
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    How on earth does a domestic HW tank do that?

    It is pressure limited to incoming water pressure, in any case, and should have no air in it, that might provide an expanding "fuel" for a water rocket effect......

    I find myself thinking there is lots more to that story..... if you have it right.....

  6. #26
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    I've heard of H W Systems doing that in Australia. Rare but can happen.

    Nev

  7. #27
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    Having an automatic drain on the tank is a big help at keeping moisture accumulation out of the tank. Adding a drain tube also provide a place for water to drain into instead of sitting at the bottom of the tank.

    One of the few Harbor Freight item I have in my shop is their brass automatic drain on my Quincy. It's not rated for the 175 psi tank pressure but it has performed just fine for over four years now. It has been well documented from reviews on the web that the plastic tubing is not well suited for routings where elevated temperatures are present. On a big vertical two stage compressor a cool routing is no problem. The drain lets out a puff when the compressor starts up and when it shuts off. Two puffs a cycle. Very cheap insurance at around $10.

  8. #28
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    How on earth does a domestic HW tank do that?
    the temperature /pressure relief valve can stick and since it is the only thing to vent excess pressure /temperature-like a gas valve not shutting off or, a relay stuck keeping the heater on all the time KABOOM! t/p valves should be checked at least once a year to make shure they are not stuck and that they seal once closed. any valve that fails must be replaced.it happened down the street from me. as far as pressure vessels go, i am more in favor of automatic drains to get rid of water in the tanks. they are expensive even for the cheapest model but ,at least it is one thing less to worry about

  9. #29
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    i like the drain tube idea. too bad i didn't
    put one in 7 years ago when i bought my comp.

    there's a coating for rusty motorcycle gas tanks called -Creem- but it's expensive($25 for a .5 pint) cheaper to buy a new one+start from scratch.

    be careful.

  10. #30
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    Don is right, the PRV valve apparently failed to oen, when the tank element stayed on a bit too long. Added to that, it was an old unit. On HW tanks, many have a concave base, which inside the tank create a cravice, that can be prone to corrosion.

    You also have to remember the "equal and opposide reaction" laws of physics..... An air tank with 80gal of air at 150 to 175 psi is one thing, but water is about 833 times more dense than air, so the resulting reactionary force will be that much greater. Kinda like hitting something with a sledge vs a ball-peen hammer.

    In this case, the tank let go all around the bottom seam, in "catasrophic mode" which meant for all intents, came off instantly, which allowed the pressure of >150 psi and the mass of ~40 gall (~333#) to be released in a split second... = really bad mess all the way to the attic.

    An air vessle failing at the same pressures, would release less than 1 actual # (mass) of air, pluss the wt of the bottom, and you know the mess that can create...

    A fellow who used to work for me, when he was young worked in a facility that manuf'd and filled oxy tanks. They had an issue where a few let go, and they remnants were found 3 miles away...

    Tim

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    This is the simplest form of shop made air-to-air intercooler. About 25' of soft copper tubing which cools the charge air before that air enters the receiver. It is faster and easier for cooled air to reach dew point within the receiver, where the resulting water can easily be drained.

    In addition to the copper tubing, you need only one pipe-to-compression adapter, and one compression-to-compression fitting. These air-to-air intercoolers are factory standard on most compressors over 10HP, using a finned intercooler tubing package that is located above or behind the pump - this one mounts directly above the pump:


    _________________________________________________

    Menace has the best solution for preventing the problem -- make it so easy to drain the tank that you do this daily. Each of the three tanks in my shop have these quick drains, and a one or two second twist of the handle is all it takes.

  12. #32
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    Tank draining -- I agree with precisionworks on this one -- making the drain valve very accessible DEFINITELY facilitates draining on a more regular basis. Naturally, manufacturers normally install the drain valve in a less-than-desirable loacation.

    I also installed the HF auto tank drain, but I plumbed it with copper tubing, rather than the plastic tubing that came in the kit (ask me how I learned that plastic tubing wasn't up to the job

    Anyone ever install a "muffler" on their tank drain? I always have to put on my ear protection before opening that valve as the noise is so doggone loud. perhaps the best "muffler" is to step up the pipe diameter as large as possible for the drain valve? Currently, the valve is pointed directly at the floor, so I'm sure that doesn't help matters at all.

    Chad

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    Anyone ever install a "muffler" on their tank drain? I always have to put on my ear protection before opening that valve...
    Chad, my ear muffs go on also. If you look closely at the last photo, you'll see that the factory 1/4" NPT drain has been retapped to 1/2" NPT. Really fast drain, at the expense of around 150 decibels To me, it seems that larger is louder. Turning the exhaust 90* (more horizontal) does keep water from splashing your safety glasses.

    I've never seen a muffler, but one could probably be made. Got any ideas???

  14. #34
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    I have never seen an air tank blow and I don't really want to. I am using a discarded 200 gallon tank for my system and I have not inspected the inside as I probably should. I did however learn the value of sand bags when I was in Viet-Nam. I sandbagged the thing in one corner of my shop so that if something happens distasteful, nobody will get hurt. I think if I was building a new shop, I might consider a small L shaped cinder-block alcove where the tank could live. It might me more comforting to protect yourself from the tank, assuming some day it is going to wear out no matter what you do to it. Just my 2C worth.

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    Mufflers are an option, I have used them, one of the easiest was simply to get an automotive spin on oil filter, and use whatever npt thread fits it on the end of the drain pipe..... however they tend to fill up with oil and water, and are another thing to replace / maintain. you can use a DVR muffler from a sandblaster, but again, something to maintain. I found the easiest solution was just to get a bit more pipe, and plumb the thing outside... assuming the area you in isnt going to be an issue because of noise...

    Tim

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    I was just thinking would putting a small amount of straight anti freeze into a compressor between draining help with preventing corrosion.

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    Default anti-freeze causes rust needs anti-rust additive

    Quote Originally Posted by Firestarter View Post
    I was just thinking would putting a small amount of straight anti freeze into a compressor between draining help with preventing corrosion.
    anti-freeze i wouldn't try...

    They gave you excellent free advice above already (warnings against 1/2 "fixing" needing perfection)

    I've done gas tank welding and sloshing, must be perfect to last, will seep not explode if wrong (bad welding aside). not the same really.

    What i've read is: radiator fluid prevents freezing / raises boiling point but CAUSES rust (has higher weight & decreases vapor pressure, and is polar charge compound (may aid rust)). That is why anti-freeze adds an anti-rust formulation. Radiator fluid is not used to prevent rust, despite what you see on the label.

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    I have often wondered if adding a few ounces of water-soluble oil (coolant) after draining the tank, would hurt anything. It does a good job of protecting all the bare steel/iron in a machine tool from rust.

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    I think this source http://www.eatoncompressor.com/f/PMNP000001_1110.pdf can help you in maintaining of your air compressor tank.
    one of the chapters includes all details and their procedural way to perform maintenance activity and manual also discussed what product we should use for tank treatment.

  21. #40
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    Talking Air compressor rust prevention

    Quote Originally Posted by OGrey View Post
    I think this source http://www.eatoncompressor.com/f/PMNP000001_1110.pdf can help you in maintaining of your air compressor tank.
    one of the chapters includes all details and their procedural way to perform maintenance activity and manual also discussed what product we should use for tank treatment.
    Been folowing this for some time, I purchased the auto drain that works by opening valve for a few seconds each hour and ohh boy, made the air compressor run way more than it should. then it clogged. I recently purchased a kit for automatic air compressor management for my 10hp IR and it seems to be the best way to drain the water all the way without running my air compressor into the ground.

    Has anyone else used a management system for there air compressor?



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