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  1. #21
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    A question was posed about Eaton Compressors. I bought a V-style pump from them about two years ago, when I was building my compressor. I put a Leeson 5HP, 220 volt, single phase motor on it and have had no complaints.

    I was impressed with Eatons way of doing business, clear instructions on pump speed and their no nonsense web site.

    No affiliation with Eaton, yada, yada.

  2. #22
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    remember a few things, air tools are extremly ineffcient, I once figured out it takes 5 times the electricity to drill a hole with air as it does with an electric drill, so your 5 hp compressor running full out to run a sander is giving you maybe 1hp at the sander, and I suspect a lot less with the tubine motors. Consider using electric grinders when possible.
    I second all the above comments. Over the years I have had customers call saying they need a used compressor, when I quoted them a used 20 or 30 year old IR for more than the new cheapies, they would say they thought the cheapies would be fine, 6 or 12 mos later they call back, the cheapie is shot and now they need a reliable machine.

  3. #23
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    I for one really enjoy air compressors. I like finding cast iron two stage 5hp types and repairing valves, switches, etc. and getting them going again. A used Quincy 325 would be hard to beat if your looking for the best. Another real good one would be a Devilbiss 432.
    One general rule of thumb on the recip. type pumps in the home use HP range is to look for one operating under 1000 rpms and still making desired CFM. Not a pump running at 2 or 3K rpms. Slower usually computes to last longer.

  4. #24
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    I bought one of the C-H 5 HP, 60 gallon compressors at Harbor Freight about 1991 or so.
    It was still running great when I sold it last summer.
    granted, it was in a home shop, but it got used quite a bit.
    I wish I would have brought it with me when I moved to AZ from CA, but I ran out of weight capacity and at 400 miles one way and five trips with an enclosed box trailer, that was enough driving for me.
    Left 200# of bolts and nuts behind as well - big mistake as you can imagine.

    I came close to buying another 60 gallon C-H compressor, this time with 6 HP - or so they say, but went for the next size down because it had wheels.
    It was an oil compressor and looked to be a nice one.
    Trouble was, it wouldn't quit running.
    Neither would the replacement.

    I ended up buying a Ridgid compressor with two little 2.5 gallon tanks in parallel.
    It's similar to what carpenters and roofers use.
    In retrospect I should have shopped some more, but we needed a compressor right now and that was about it as far as local availability went.

    So far it's working ok, but the regulated air supply bleeds it down pretty quick so to an extent it's a touch worthless other than filling tires and air bottles.

    My friend bought one as well when he moved a month later.
    Then he built a nice 30' x 30' shop.
    With the limitations of the Ridgid compressor, he left it in the garage down the hill and uses it strictly for airing up tires.

    He bought an oil-less at Sears.
    I told him it was gonna be noisy . . . even so I didn't realize how noisy it was going to be.

    Every time it kicks on he's sorry.
    Heck, I don't get up there as often as I'd like and when the compressor kicks on, I'm sorry too....

  5. #25
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    Lots of good advice at the link below, from the Greatest Hits section, by Forrest Addy.

    Air compressors

  6. #26
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    I'm extremly happy with that IR SS5L5 that smtty58 posted. I use mine for the same things you listed.

    I have also run bigger (harbor freight 10 gallon) outdoor sand blasters and had no problem.
    Duty Cycle = Continuous and they mean it.
    2000 hours between oil changes.

    I know it's still not "super duper industrial" and that IR has been screwed up by bean counters but it's PLENTY for a home shop.

  7. #27
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    Erik,

    I also use the formula HORSEPOWER = (V x A x EFF x PF)÷746 and it is technically correct. The problem with that formula is that it fails to take into account torque.

    Electric motors develop maximum torque at stall. And the lower the RPM of the motor the greater the torque.

    Torque in pound feet = HP x 5250 / rpm

    HP = Torque x rpm / 5250

    RPM = 120 x Frequency / Number of Poles

    At 1200 rpm, a motor develops a 4.5 lb.ft. per HP. At 1800 rpm, a motor develops a 3 lb.ft. per HP. At 2400 rpm, a motor develops 2 lb.ft. per HP. And so on until you reach 3600 rpm (where most inexpensive compressor motors run) and the motor develops 0.87 lb.ft. per HP.

    Certainly Ingersoll can supply data that validates 5HP on their lower cost unit. (Grainger lists motors that draw 19 amps as 5HP.) Generally speaking, at 230 volts, a single-phase motor draws 5 amps per HP. Any less should make one question how and why.

    Barry Milton

  8. #28
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    maybe my 5hp IR is only really a 3.5 hp? Maybe they feel they have to put a 5HP sticker on it to compete with the other crooks compressors they sit side by side with.

    I REALLY DONT CARE.

    Whatever it is it pumps plenty of air. it's quiet enough, trouble free enough, cheap enough, and I'm really happy with mine.

  9. #29
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    First, I'll quote Precisionworks quoting Ingersoll Rand:

    "Here's a quote from IR,"In the year 2000 we ran a competition to find the oldest operating Type 30 in the country and found one in a service station near Swan Hill that had run continuously since 1934! The cast iron construction, two stage intercooled design and computer-optimised cylinder head and valve layout . . . "

    Then, I'll ask:

    Evidently IR was well ahead (ahem) of general industry in the use of computer-aided design, but were they forced to develop their own software or were they able to buy commercial CAD software?

    Or possibly they mastered time-travel and were able to do the computer work decades after the design entered production?

    John

  10. #30
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    [QUOTE]Having said that, thanks for the excellent education of quality named brand compressor manufacturers, both past and present (Carla, et al). Howwever, it looks like a new Quincy industrial unit might be a little out of my price range.

    My friend, I think you need to listen to the
    lady (Carla), she did recommend hunting up used
    if you could not afford new. "Learn from my mistakes", First and foremost auto body air tools are the death of cheap compressors, and
    a blast cabinet? You are going to kill anything
    from the big box stores. Compressors are supposedly rated to run 50% of the time, any more than that their lives end quickly, even
    only for short periods. Back a long time ago in
    a land far away, my buddy and I were a couple of
    auto body and painting fools. Probably turning
    a car every 1-2 months. I was buying a collection
    of big box compressors in the $400-$600 range.
    They would blow-up I would go buy another, with
    out keeping track of how long they were lasting.
    Finally wrote a date on a Sears Craftmen twin 6.5
    HP I paid $500 for, It died in 6 months! The
    moral of the story, better to pay $1750 once
    than $500 6 times.

  11. #31
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    John,

    I also thought it unusual that IR would mention the use of CAD on a pump that predates World War II. But it's their pump and they can (and will) say what they want, even if it makes no sense to a few readers with a keen eye.

    For 90% of potential buyers, "computer-optimised" has a soothing, reassuring sound. I prefer "guaranteed not to rust, bust, or collect dust".

    Barry Milton

  12. #32
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    I bought a pump from Eaton Compressors, here is the link.
    http://www.eatoncompressor.com/page/page/504413.htm
    In particular I got this pump.
    http://www.eatoncompressor.com/catal...643/547020.htm

    Here is a pic, the tank I already had.


    I have had for about 8 or 9 months and am very satisfied. It keeps up with my blast booth easily.

  13. #33
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    Another quick note. If reading the fine print
    of the Compressor's manual it says "Commercial
    Use Voids One Year Limited Warranty" it's
    already telling you it's a piece of crap no
    matter how much it costs.

  14. #34
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    Paul,

    I've looked at lots of pumps, thinking of building a compressor or refitting one of the C-H units when it dies. The Eaton you bought is one of the most impressive I've seen. Grainger sells similar pumps for $750+.

    What RPM is your motor, and what RPM is the pump running?

    Barry Milton

  15. #35
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    Dualkit,

    Thanks for the reply. I most certainly did read all of Carla's post, and if you read the last sentence of my reply....I am most definately embarking on a hunt for used local stuff.

    My search and education on Quincy started by shopping their new and current product line. Definately premium stuff.

    Anyway, great replies all! Thanks again.

    The Ingersoll product line does warrant a closer inspection to determine exactly where their various prodcut offerings fall in terms of quality/price/performance.

  16. #36
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    I would never own any thing but a Quincy compressor. The best. Mine is about 35 years old and runs as good as the first day I bought it---and it was used then!!

  17. #37
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    We ran a curtis compressor for several years part time then over 1 year running 160 hours a week supporting a cnc shop standalone. It was a 7.5 hp single phase. The motor finally gave up and I wound up giving it to one less fortunate who I think has it back in service. The air america devilbliss compressors stood up maybe 1/4 as long. I finally got a 25 HP screw compressor, and now have an Ingersoll SSR EP60 rotary...A cheap compressor will cost just as much in the long haul as a good one and let you down at the worst times.

  18. #38
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    I would agree that the compressors from the big box stores are "value engineered" but for the life of me I don't know where all those dead compressors go when they die. I spent a long time looking for a spare air tank thinking a dead oiless compressor would be a ideal candidate. No luck, I couldn't find even one dead compressor. I looked at garage sales, auctions, junk yards and even asked the scrap guy. The only thing that makes sense is that people must repair these darn things when they die. Talk about throwing good money after bad.

    TMT

  19. #39
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    I bought Eaton's 3 cylinder 2 stage compressor pumps about one year ago and so far have been satisfied. The only complaint I have is that the unloaders won't unload but that is probably due to the fact that my pressure relief valve is set to go off at a 125 psi. Eaton told me that I need more pressure than that for the unloaders to work. Their price for the pump was very reasonable and Eaton claims their pumps are made right here in the USA.. a big bonus in my mind. You can call up the owner and speak to him directly.. try that with any other company!!

    BTW.. I own a mobile farm tire repair service so I use this compressor everyday.

    Steve

  20. #40
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    [QUOTE]for the life of me I don't know where all those dead compressors go when they die.

    I have 2 air tanks from old compressors in use
    to add volume to the system as a head start.
    I gave 2 whole dead units away. The
    other 2 were throw in the dumpster. Ok, I have
    accounted for 6 of the cheapies I buried.


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