Even More Machinery Rebuilds...Takisawa Lathe
Close
Login to Your Account
Likes Likes:  0
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 33
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    So. Cal. 33.61N 117.66W
    Posts
    389
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Post

    In keeping with the current theme of machinery rebuilds, here is my completed Takisawa TSL-800D rebuild project:

    Before:


    During:


    After:


    Items completed:
    New D1-6 spindle (replaced the A1-5) and oil return ring.
    New cross-slide lead screw.
    New cross-slide lead screw bearings.
    New set of cross-slide nuts.
    Re-fitted cross-slide gib.
    Overhaul of carriage oil pump system.
    Overhaul of electrical system for VFD.
    Removal of approx. 10lbs of sludge from various sumps.
    Cleaned and flushed headstock and carriage oil sumps.
    Removed old paint and defective body filler.
    New Bondo and paint (Magnet Paints – MAGNATRON Acrylic Polyurethane 5000 Series – Color W20 Ford Wimbelton White).

    New Tooling Added:
    New (used) 8” Rohm 3-jaw D1-6 chuck.
    New 8” Skinner 4-jaw D1-6 chuck.
    New Dorian CXA Tool Post.
    Complete set of Takisawa change gears.
    Takisawa Steady Rest.
    Takisawa 14” D1-6 Face Plate.
    Newall C-80 DRO.

    More pictures:

    http://www.metalworking.com/dropbox/..._01_Before.JPG
    http://www.metalworking.com/dropbox/..._01_During.JPG
    http://www.metalworking.com/dropbox/...d_01_After.JPG
    http://www.metalworking.com/dropbox/..._02_Before.JPG
    http://www.metalworking.com/dropbox/...d_02_After.JPG
    http://www.metalworking.com/dropbox/..._03_Before.JPG
    http://www.metalworking.com/dropbox/..._03_During.JPG
    http://www.metalworking.com/dropbox/...d_03_After.JPG
    http://www.metalworking.com/dropbox/..._04_Before.JPG
    http://www.metalworking.com/dropbox/...d_04_After.JPG
    http://www.metalworking.com/dropbox/..._05_Before.JPG
    http://www.metalworking.com/dropbox/...d_05_After.JPG
    http://www.metalworking.com/dropbox/..._06_Before.JPG
    http://www.metalworking.com/dropbox/...d_06_After.JPG
    http://www.metalworking.com/dropbox/...int_Before.JPG
    http://www.metalworking.com/dropbox/...nt_Sanding.JPG
    http://www.metalworking.com/dropbox/...int_Primer.JPG
    http://www.metalworking.com/dropbox/...int_After2.JPG
    http://www.metalworking.com/dropbox/...dle_Before.JPG
    http://www.metalworking.com/dropbox/...dle_During.JPG
    http://www.metalworking.com/dropbox/...ndle_After.JPG


    My thanks to all of you who have contributed to this project with either material or advice!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Coastal Dogpatch, SC, USA
    Posts
    51,175
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2734
    Likes (Received)
    5525

    Post

    Ah, finally a rebuild that really is a rebuild ! VERY nice !

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    McDonald, Pennsylvania
    Posts
    1,572
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2
    Likes (Received)
    29

    Post

    After all that beautiful work, aren't you afraid to scratch it now if you use it?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Roseville, CA
    Posts
    3,858
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    26
    Likes (Received)
    16

    Post

    Another great looking machine. Makes me want to go down to the shop and put a shroud over mine.

    I am a bit curious why you decided to replace the A1-5 spindle mount?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Vicksburg, MS
    Posts
    4,931
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    30
    Likes (Received)
    259

    Post

    Tak, did you manage to find a replacement D1-6 spindle or did you have to make one? I know the D series is a lot more popular but doesn't the A1 type spindle have less overhang? Do you pick up spindle bore by switching?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    So. Cal. 33.61N 117.66W
    Posts
    389
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Post

    After all that beautiful work, aren't you afraid to scratch it now if you use it?
    Yes, that’s the problem! I’ll need to find a way to get over that (therapy probably)! I remember Don remarked once that any one who paints all of their machine tools the same color has serious issues! I fully agree (I even painted my dust cyclone!):


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    suburbs of Ann Arbor, MI, USA
    Posts
    13,038
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    423
    Likes (Received)
    1011

    Post

    Tak, simply beautiful.

    What are you using to "shine" up the bare metal surfaces if you don't mind revealing your secrets to thousands of inquiring minds?

    -Matt

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    So. Cal. 33.61N 117.66W
    Posts
    389
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Post

    Yes, I swapped spindles with another “Takaholic” who is also rebuilding a couple TSL-800s. He’s also the guy I described before who had a connection to get into the LA Takisawa warehouse with a shopping cart just before they closed and stock up on spare parts like a kid in a candy shop!

    He has two TSL-800s, one with an A1-5 and one recently acquired with a D1-6. However, he only has extensive A1-5 tooling. Since I was just starting from scratch and could go either way, it seemed logical for us to swap – he’ll have more versatility with his A1 stuff, and D1 stuff seems a little easier for me to find (especially on Ebay).

    After reading many of the posts about spindle replacement, I was a little worried about reassembling the headstock. I probably tore it apart without researching too much but realized I might have bitten off too much. However, I followed Forrest’s recent instructions about installing precision spindle bearings to the letter and everything worked out fine. I measured my spindle at dead nuts 0.0000” run out just like the old one. The headstock seems to be just as smooth and quiet as I remember before all the way up to 1800 rpm.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    So. Cal. 33.61N 117.66W
    Posts
    389
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Post

    Matt-

    I just used Scotchbrite for most of the polishing, but I did use a belt sander with a fine belt for the flat surfaces on the apron and carriage. I believe my friend did use a surface grinder and a buffing wheel for some of his stuff though.

    Just to prove he’s not a fictional character, here is his rebuild. Puts mine to shame. I can’t wait to see his next one!






  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    So. Cal. 33.61N 117.66W
    Posts
    389
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Post

    doesn't the A1 type spindle have less overhang? Do you pick up spindle bore by switching?
    Jay,

    Yes, the D1 definitely takes up a couple more inches in travel – not insignificant in a machine with only 30” between centers. But that’s the tradeoff. And yes, there is quite a bit more bore in the D1. The nominal bore of the A1 stated in the manual is only 1 3/8” but it seems to be even smaller in some places along the length. The clear bore on the D1 is much larger – 1 ½” maybe even 1 ¾” - and looks to be consistent the entire length.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    3,058
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    6
    Likes (Received)
    68

    Post

    Hi Derek,

    The machines' color even goes with the garage paint. Martha Stewart would be proud! [img]smile.gif[/img]

    You put a lot of time and effort into the rebuilds, and the machines look most impressive. Good job!

    FYI, another Bay Area HSM-type is flying down to LA today to visit Tom and probably buy a Mori like mine. He came over for a couple of hours yesterday to look at my lathe, and I filled him with information/bored him to tears (delete the inappropriate option) with everything I could think to tell him.

    cheers,
    Michael

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Country
    AFGHANISTAN
    Posts
    89
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Post

    Very nice. Looks like brand new.
    How much time did that take?
    Also, I noticed your friends has wheels on his. Do you know if he uses it like that?
    steve

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    nashua nh usa
    Posts
    77
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Post

    Is that all one casting? My god - what's it weigh?

    I see there was a Webb label on it before - does that mean the big Webb I see at my dealer's is some super duper lathe?

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Roseville, CA
    Posts
    3,858
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    26
    Likes (Received)
    16

    Post

    No, it is not all one casting. The headstock case can be unbolted from the bed, but is factory adjusted and would take a bit of fussing to get it back on just right. The bed ways in turn also can be unbolted from the base, should you want to.

    The total weight of this little 14 x 30 lathe is right at 2,400 lbs, so lots of cast iron there. I have one also, although it does not look as nice as either of these beauties.

    I have the same question about the casters bolted onto the base. Great idea for moving it around, but probably not for actually working with it?

    Webb was an importer, as were Royal, Sharp and Yuasa at one time or another. All of this same basic model.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    2,271
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    53
    Likes (Received)
    189

    Post

    I've felt good about these 800's since I restarted paying attention to such things recently. Thanks for the detailed photographs.

    Northernsinger

  16. #16
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    4,303
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1259
    Likes (Received)
    1189

    Post

    I just used Scotchbrite for most of the polishing, but I did use a belt sander with a fine belt for the flat surfaces on the apron and carriage. I believe my friend did use a surface grinder and a buffing wheel for some of his stuff though.
    How did you polish the ways? They look as bright and shiny as the apron and carriage -- did you use the belt sander? [img]smile.gif[/img]

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Japan
    Posts
    385
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    2

    Post

    Hey, we got a lathe just like that (except ugly) in the shop here! I think it's a TSL-550.

    Ahem. You must know something about the bearings on these things. This one we got rumbles very slightly at certain speeds, then quiets down if you push a drill into the workpiece with the tailstock. It's the only machine I ever ran that chatters when you're NOT cutting. Actually it does leave a chattery finish, when taking light facing cuts. I don't think the bearings are totally shot, but they sure need to be tightened up some. How to do it?

    Is this Takisawa still in business?

    Machine maintenance is unheard of here in Japan; there was gunk 1/8th inch thick stuck all over the machine here. And nobody knows anything about getting parts or manuals.

    By the way, that looks great, and I think these ARE nice machines.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    So. Cal. 33.61N 117.66W
    Posts
    389
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Post

    As a few have commented, the wheels on my friend’s machine are simply for moving, not to be used when in operation. He’s already got that one sold and is starting on his second (the one that originally had the D1 spindle). And no, we didn’t regrind or sand the ways, just a little scotchbrite and some elbow grease.

    Fuzzbean:

    I’m certainly no bearing expert, but the fact that your machine quiets down when you put a thrust load on the main bearing does sound like it’s loose. To tighten, remove the rear spindle bearing cover on the belt drive end of the headstock. I believe that one is held on by three 8mm cap screws and is the only one that doesn’t have an oil seal, just a groove with a drain hole lined up with a return port in the casting. It’s also put in with some gasket sealer like Permatex that you should replace when you reinstall the cover.

    With the cover removed, you’ll find a pretty standard bearing preload arrangement – a castellated washer with one of its locking tabs bent down into one flat of a spanner nut. Just unbend the tab and use a drift to tighten up the nut a bit. The tech manual doesn’t give any torque specification. Just tighten and run the machine to check for noise and run out. If the bearings start to get hot to the touch, then you’ve tightened too much. Slightly warm is OK.

    As far as parts go, Takisawa stopped importing these manual lathes into the country years ago. Obviously, Takisawa still sells their CNC stuff everywhere here, but they cut off all spare parts and technical support for the TSL’s, so for all intents and purposes, they are out of business as far as we in the States are concerned. However, if you check out the Japanese version of the Takisawa website, you’ll still find reference to the full line of TSL manual lathes. It is my understanding that you can still buy them new in Asia (I don’t read Japanese). If they are available new, I would think that parts and service would still logically be available as well.

    This sounds like a potential opportunity for some bright, inquisitive machinist in Japan to resell TSL parts back here to the States! There certainly seems to be enough people here still using these machines to create enough demand at least for a small part-time business! Interested?

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Santa Cruz Ca.
    Posts
    506
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    29
    Likes (Received)
    21

    Post

    Very nice Tak, I was wondering how hard it was to pull the spindle out? Are the gears on the spindle tight or just a slip fit and I assume the bearings came out without damage. I am contemplating swapping spindles in a Sag 12 and don't want to force the wrong thing. Any comments on your removal would be helpfull. Thanks Jim

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Roseville, CA
    Posts
    3,858
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    26
    Likes (Received)
    16

    Post

    Tak makes an interesting point about the original mfg still being in business and still producting manual lathes for the Asian market. Whether or not there are gears and other components that would fit these 20+ year old machines is a good question. Perhaps some of the forum members who live and work in that part of the world could check this out.

    I have to wonder if they still provide parts for these machines, but no one imports them. Then again if they are available, what is the price?

    As I recall, the factory is actually in Taiwan, and hopefully has not moved to China.


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •