Fighting rust, felt lining in toolbox - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    I quick google of "moth balls" shows there are two type based on either naphthalene or paradichlorobenzene. Anybody know which ones to use to prevent rust?

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    Nox rust paper is the stuff you unwrap from any and nearly all of the trinkits when you buy them new. It is known as vapor paper. I have no idea of it's chemestry. You can buy it in 100' rolls in a cardboard box. If you wrap ferous metal in it and do not subject it to actual moisture it helps. I never throw it away. Either lay it flat under your tools or just crumple it up and wad it in a discrete area near anything you want to protect. Just as the rust fairy visits you, the noxrust fairy is the good witch from the other side of town. Nox rust looses it's powers with age. The less air change the better. Minimal air change is nearly necessary. If I have something I intend to store till I sell it I clean, lightly oil it, wrap it in nox rust, then wrap the final part in aluminum foil. i have no idea if this smart but I have never had a problem. Nox rust is the stuff marked with a date, It is usually brown, usually marked "Do not use near food stuffs."

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    A quick froogle search on "camphor block" shows they are readily available from your local witch supply store.

    It seems to come in 1 oz and 1 lb blocks. How much would I need in a given tool chest drawer? Does it keep if in a sealed container or must it be consumed immediately? Do I need a black cat to use it?

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    I collect violins. There is an evel villian known as a bow bug. They will infest a violin case and eat the hair off of your bow. You open your case and you got horse hair everywhere. I put about two dozen moth balls. in every case I own. This was a very important thing for me to find out about. I will experiment with moth balls and if they work I'll certainly be pleased. I'm not going to take the leap of faith but I will certainly put an aray of replaceable ferous items in their near proximity and get back with you. John

  5. #25
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    Jim-

    How large a dehumidifier do you run? I've tried several of the "garden variety" types, and they really didn't help much. I collect plenty of water for our plants, but it only seems to drop the relative humidity a point or two but raises the temperature several (uncomfortable) degrees. I gave up with dehumidifiers several years ago when the last one I owned died.

    I may also have an air flow problem as my shop is awkwardly shaped with many air "dead spots". My tools and I are not allowed in SWMBO's half of the basement; there is a well founded fear of creeping machinism.

    For creature comfort,I now use an air conditioner when I'm working in the shop. No condensation on my machines as they are pre-heated

    Mike

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    I quick google of "moth balls" shows there are two type based on either naphthalene or paradichlorobenzene. Anybody know which ones to use to prevent rust?
    Paradichlorobenzene is now illegal... so it would be the other ones.

    Para was good stuff, kills , while the others just "stun" bugs.

    Besides that, my mother, a chemistry teacher, used it as a melting point sample for classes. She was unpleased when it was removed from sale (or supposed to be)...

  7. #27
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    No, paradichlorobenzene seems readily available...

    moth balls at Walgreens

  8. #28
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    "How large a dehumidifier do you run?"

    Hmm. I have no idea - it was a second that
    sears had on sale about 15 years ago, and I
    bought it on a whim. I think I still have the
    manual for it someplace, what do they rate those
    things in, pints? I'll check to see.

    It's also stuffed way up in the overhead
    in my shop, in a corner. I put it there so
    it can drain directly into the sink nearby,
    but the airflow is probably less than optimal.
    As you say, it also provides a lot of unwanted
    heat when it runs - not so much a problem in
    the swing seasons, but right now it's pretty
    toasty in the shop.

    Jim

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    OK, this turned out to be a 40 pint/day
    unit.

    Jim

  10. #30
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    Boeshield my friends, spray on and wipe off. It helps the situation.

  11. #31
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    What would you think about soaking the felt with Boeshield?

    -Ben

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    Rice, put some dry rice in a box and keep that in where ever you store tools. I have allways had a small screw box filled with rice in the box I store in the basement, always works. Every now and again change the rice. This has allways worked for me.

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    The camphor I used came in blocks, 1/2" x 1 1/4" x 1 1/4", I put 3 blocks in different drawers of the tool box. After a few days with the lid and front closed, the whole box takes on the camphor smell.

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    Camphor. Partially unwrap the plastic from one of the small squares and put it in the back of the drawer. Mine last right around a year.

    -Mike

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    I’ve had the same issue. I replaced all the felt in my Kennedy box. Overnight I went back and was speechless. My Stanley square was rusted beyond repair and my starrett micrometers as well. I am going to place everything in seperate boxes to keep it away from the felt

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    I tried using mothballs but I had trouble getting their tiny legs apart

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    I've been using "fluid film"

    Lanolin based (or at least a constituent). It smells a bit funny, but you get sort of fond of it in small doses.

    Best of all, the stuff "creeps", No surface left uncovered!

    It works for me, at least I use a lot of it. ;-)

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    i have seen a dozen brand new combination squares still in wood boxes in a tool crib that were wrapped in plastic with oil and looked brand new condition
    .
    til i tried to unscrew the screw clamp and found the screw had rusted to the nut and it somehow had no oil on it.
    .
    some keep parts submerged in oil. seems a bit extreme but i hear it works the best for any missed spots that dont get sprayed with oil

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    Quote Originally Posted by DMF_TomB View Post
    i have seen a dozen brand new combination squares still in wood boxes in a tool crib that were wrapped in plastic with oil and looked brand new condition
    .
    til i tried to unscrew the screw clamp and found the screw had rusted to the nut and it somehow had no oil on it.
    .
    some keep parts submerged in oil. seems a bit extreme but i hear it works the best for any missed spots that dont get sprayed with oil
    When still new and 'amazing", a product of the Perlite Corp was making the rounds in suburban PGH. Can't recall the actual name - we all called it "fruit juice" because of the pleasant odour.

    It was being sold primarily as an additive to reduce friction and extend conventional lubricant life in the massive gearboxes of Big Steel's slab and rolling mills, side benefit rust prevention.

    I'd suspect it was an early synthetic Ester of the tribe that eventually led to "Mobil One" & Sputniks. And/or Boeshield?

    Long story short, an initial soaking of the felt, circa 1960, a top-up or three with other similar goods a few times since, and nothing in my old original Kennedy has EVER rusted.

    Nowadays, I just buy a bundle each of roll-stock and precut sheet VPI or clone treated paper every year or two. One sheet under the loose mats in each drawer, another overtop the seldom-used goods, unused paper stashed, bagged, in lower drawers..

    Still no rust.

    Only way to stop damage from that s**t is to prevent it before it starts.

    "Fluid Film" BTW I use as well. Motorcar suspension and undersides, mostly. Be aware it biodegrades in about 12 months, then is easily washed off for re-treat with clean and new.

    That is a feature, not a bug.

  22. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    When still new and 'amazing", a product of the Perlite Corp was making the rounds in suburban PGH. Can't recall the actual name - we all called it "fruit juice" because of the pleasant odour.

    It was being sold primarily as an additive to reduce friction and extend conventional lubricant life in the massive gearboxes of Big Steel's slab and rolling mills, side benefit rust prevention.

    I'd suspect it was an early synthetic Ester of the tribe that eventually led to "Mobil One" & Sputniks. And/or Boeshield?

    Long story short, an initial soaking of the felt, circa 1960, a top-up or three with other similar goods a few times since, and nothing in my old original Kennedy has EVER rusted.

    Nowadays, I just buy a bundle each of roll-stock and precut sheet VPI or clone treated paper every year or two. One sheet under the loose mats in each drawer, another overtop the seldom-used goods, unused paper stashed, bagged, in lower drawers..

    Still no rust.

    Only way to stop damage from that s**t is to prevent it before it starts.

    "Fluid Film" BTW I use as well. Motorcar suspension and undersides, mostly. Be aware it biodegrades in about 12 months, then is easily washed of for re-treat with clean and new.

    That is a feature, not a bug.
    .
    just saying rust preventative that doesnt get into tight spaces like between a screw and nut and stuff can rust together. often tools can look ok but internal features can be badly rusted
    .
    i have heard of gun parts kept submerged in oil for long term storage


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