Fighting rust, felt lining in toolbox - Page 3
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 41 to 44 of 44
  1. #41
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    Posts
    19,279
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    6097

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DMF_TomB View Post
    .
    just saying rust preventative that doesnt get into tight spaces like between a screw and nut and stuff can rust together. often tools can look ok but internal features can be badly rusted
    .
    i have heard of gun parts kept submerged in oil for long term storage
    "Fruit juice" was a superb penetrant - even its vapour, probably. One of those other "juices' was Hollingsworth's aqua coloured penetrating oil. Reeked of synthetic oil of Wintergreen, that one did.

    I use Marvel 'Mystery" oil on rags over a fifty-foot coil-spring steel plumber's "snake" wound into a water-heater base leak/overflow catchment pan. Mostly ignorant kerosene, but the "other stuff" does the do. No rust, one treatment every ten years or so.

    G'Dad was a fan of the soaked-in-oil lore. Problem was he always waited until sumthin' was already rusted, and rather badly. Reversible, as with Evap-o-rust oil were never.

    SERIOUS chore clearing his garage/shop when he passed.Must have been a hundred Maxwell House Coffee tins with old used motor oil and lumps of rusted-unrecognizable former-tools in 'em underfoot.


    Keeping firearms corrosion-free has never been a problem, here. We've been using "RIG" = Rust Inhibiting GREASE - since sometime prior to 1960. Unlike Cosmoline (which I also traffic in, but vehicles again,) a film of RIG need not even be visible or detectable. Weapon is always ready for immediate use. Mind - the handguns also get a new blue plastic anti-corrosion embedded slow-release protective bag (Pachmeyer?). As those ziplocks reach end-o-life, I still leave the old ones in gun cases, now empty.

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Geilenkirchen, Germany
    Posts
    1,935
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1161
    Likes (Received)
    955

    Default

    The problem is the felt. There appears to be good felt and bad felt. There was a previous thread here on this very subject, but I can't find it.

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    267
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    60
    Likes (Received)
    109

    Default

    Summary: Felt expert says don't use felt in toolboxes

    Last year I was trying to identify a large roll of surplus felt and called the mfg. I was surprised that the woman I spoke with was not just a clerk but a felt expert.

    I explained the toolbox application and posed questions about corrosion, synthetic vs natural, glue choice, pH, etc. Her opinion - don't use felt for storing tools. She says it is a poor choice because it attracts and holds moisture. She said she'd use rubber.

    So an expert at a large felt manufacture says don't use felt... I was very surprised by that, and her candor. I guess choosing felt is all about history and aesthetics.

    A few years back I had a mildewy Kennedy chest. I cleaned it out, gave it a nice hammered rattle can spray job that took forever to harden, and put new felt in. Well, it sure looks nice.

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Vershire, Vermont
    Posts
    1,755
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1000
    Likes (Received)
    478

    Default

    Synthetic felt (acrylic, I believe) is readily available from fabric stores, a lot less expensive than wool felt and a lot less hygroscopic. Give it a dose of your favorite M1/ Boeshield /WD40/diesel fuel/whatever petroleum and keep that dehumidifier/air conditioner running.

    The problem with paradichlorobenzene and vapor paper is that their off-gasses are not good for humans to breathe.


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •