home made 5c chuck done! - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    I have never been so flattered.Thank you all for the nice coments.

    jkilroy.It is out of a GM I think.Friend rebuils traneys.I was over at his place and looking around when I saw these gears.The wheels started to turn and the rest is history.I am sure you could go to any trans rebuilder and get them for free.It needs to be lage enough to bore and install a bushing for the 5C threads.
    One of the harder tasks was installing the collet key.I am not use to doing little things and am all thumbs.Could have used Rivett to help.
    Here is a pic of the key installed.




    It was a socket head screw.A 6-40 I believe.I had to drill down thru the outside to the center and tap it.Threading it in was hard!Need little fingers. Jim

  2. #42
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    WOW BEAUTIFUL!

  3. #43
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    very impressive indeed!

  4. #44
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    When I made my little 5C collet chuck I used a 1/8" flush mount pipe plug. Drilled and tapped the hole, screwed in a stock plug, then marked it for orientation. Yanked it out, milled a flat on the inside edge of the plug to serve as the key, then screwed it back in to the collet holder, tweaked it until it fit nice and easy. Good work on your chuck, looks beautiful! [img]smile.gif[/img]

  5. #45
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    I have to add my admiration for this work of art. Being in production machining I do not get to see such beautiful work on many occasions. Thank you for sharing. It inspires me to do some "special" projects myself.
    Great job. You should be very proud.

  6. #46
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    That is just beautiful!

  7. #47
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    Default He should still do it

    Quote Originally Posted by jkilroy View Post
    Fantastic work. And yes I am going to say it. You should have written this project up and submitted it to one of the magazines. Seeing that this is so much better than everything else they have published in the past two years.

    He should still go ahead and write it up. While he has posted photos, which constitutes "publication", the details of design, machining and construction have not been published. I think it could still qualify.

    This work is so superb, it truly deserves to be memorialized in some form. And I'm sure there are a lot of guys who would like to know those details because if the had that info, they might make one for themselves.

    Rick

  8. #48
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    Default Write an article

    j king,

    Sent you a PM on writing an article.

    Rick

  9. #49
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    What a beautiful job. Hats off to you.

  10. #50
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    Wow!!!
    Thanks for bumping this beauty back up Dave!!!
    CNC quality surface finish...on a radius....on a manual!
    And the whole thought process too!
    Great Job Jim
    Give us an update on the article sometime.
    I don't want to miss that!!!!

  11. #51
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    Beautiful work Mr. King.
    An appeal to Moderator Milacron- any chance we could have a Metalworking Hall of Fame?
    A project of this design elegance and build excellence should be set apart from background noise of almost one million posts. Like other halls of fame, it should be difficult to get into and voted upon by specifically qualified individuals.
    My two pence worth
    jh

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    very nice the finished project is fantastic

  13. #53
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    Really exceptional J!!

    I've been waiting for one of the real guys to answer reggie_obe's post, back on page 2.
    "Why a collet chuck instead of a collet adapter/drawbar assembly? What advantage does it give you?"

    I can't speak for J but I'm building a collet chuck for my 17" LeBlond, which has a 1.5" spindle bore. I've chosen the TG150 series of collets, with their matching maximum bore of 1.5". It would defeat the 1.5" size for through feed if I bushed the lathe bore down with a draw tube. Just couldn't do it.

    By the way, my chuck won't be anywhere near as nice as J's. For one thing, I'll be using a Kennemetal collet nut with a pin spanner.

    My excuse for not rising to the occasion? Well, hell, I would but the damn TG150's gots no steenking threads, other wise I would. ha! as if I could....

    Bob

  14. #54
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    Default

    J King's chuck is featured as a "sticky" in the Monarch Lathe Forum.

    Monarch has used that type of chuck, better known as a Sjogren, after its inventor, for decades.

    J King's version is notable for the use of "found" materials, for low cost, and its unique shape, for "wow" factor.

    An advantage of the Sjogren design, which has been made since at least 1929, is it has so few moving parts.

    The way J King made his chuck's "inner gear", which is what actually does the closing, is unique in that it is an assembly with a replaceable threaded portion.

    In a Sjogren, the inner gear is itself threaded, and is expensive to replace.

    My hat is off to J King!

  15. #55
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    Default Monarch EE ?

    Is the lathe a Monarch EE? I love those little lathes. Great job on the machining and design.

  16. #56
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    I mentioned above that I was making a collet chuck for my 17" lathe.
    It's not worth a new thread and besides, J Kings beauty deserves being bumped back to the top.

    A few more shots...
    You've gotta' start somewhere, drilling a 3-1/2" X 5-1/2", 1-/58".
    http://i102.photobucket.com/albums/m...ead-scrapI.jpg
    The TG150 series allows me to max out my spindle bore.
    http://i102.photobucket.com/albums/m...mesacharmI.jpg
    I know, "get a tool post grinder" I will but I got lucky this time with my ROTOZIP, "grinder-on-a-stick.
    http://i102.photobucket.com/albums/m...eronastick.jpg
    I mounted it on the spindle, squared the face and pulled a collet against it with some allthread, to indicate my compound to the taper.
    http://i102.photobucket.com/albums/m...catecollet.jpg
    Here it is roughed out with taper. Note; I knurled the body while it was still in the 4 jaw.
    http://i102.photobucket.com/albums/m...cRef/taper.jpg
    Truing the stone.
    http://i102.photobucket.com/albums/m...ruingstone.jpg
    Not a bad grind, considering
    http://i102.photobucket.com/albums/m...roundtaper.jpg
    The chuck is a true as my old LeBlond, having been machined on the spindle.
    http://i102.photobucket.com/albums/m...ef/FinitoI.jpg
    That's a Dapra collet nut and a 1/2" collet.
    http://i102.photobucket.com/albums/m.../FinitoIII.jpg
    Stuck the first 1-1/2" thing I found in it, an 1-1/2" shell reamer spindle w/ #5MT.
    http://i102.photobucket.com/albums/m...ef/FinitoV.jpg

    Now I don't have to pout the next time I see a nice little Southbend or Logan with a 5C collet closer. Tooling up on the TG150 collets is getting expensive though.

    Hope you don't mind me stepping on your thread J....your's is still easily the best!

    Bob

  17. Likes j king, Bill Kerns liked this post
  18. #57
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    Thanks for posting that Bob. I have a TG150 setup for my NT50 machines and I had not thought about using those on a lathe. My Rivett won't pass 1.5 but it will pass 1.375, a lot bigger than 5C will handle, thanks for the info.

  19. #58
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    My pleasure jkilroy.
    I researched collets for this project, didn't have any that were big enough. Chose the TG150 series for their ID match, (actually, the LeBlond is just under 1-5/8, oh well), and the 3" long body, much more tapered section than most, great gripping potential.

    Besides, what does R8 mean? 5C? How about the ER series, no hint of the capacity, ya' gotta know. I like the TG's, simple math for a simple guy. TG75's max at 3/4", TG 100 at an inch. There's something that makes sense here.

    ....but, now that I'm committed, (or should be), on the drawing board I have a do-it-all TG150 spinner, bearings on the way. Even toying with stepper motor drive through 36 to 1 worm gear X 1.8° steps = 1/2 degree. I like it, beats the heck out of a 15°, 24 hole plate, like 30 times. Plus, you can have the stepper just keep on a steppin', much like "spinning". The right circuitry and quadruple the steps, can we say "2,880 discreet steps in a circle", whooeeee..

    Add a sine base, cantilever it off the surface grinder and voila, a very short, (7" max) cylindrical/taper grinder. My mills are all excited too. Now, with a tapered adapter, 150 down to TG75 for the teensy stuff....aw, never mind, I'll be 69 in 3 days, gotta' quit drawing and start building.

    By the way, not quite finished with the collet chuck, I have to make a collet wrench for the Dapra nut, so I'll make two, chuck up a mandrel in the collet chuck, mount it in my dividing head 3-jaw and drill/ream (with an endmill), six 3/8" pin holes in the body, same diameter as the nut.

    Bob

  20. #59
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    That is a super near job. Nice work.

    As for the 3 vs 4 gear thing, depending on the number of teeth on the inner and outer gears, it is possible that the original four positions are the only ones that will work. Or there may be some intermediate positions, like the 45 degree increments, that would also work. One thing for sure, you could use two gears. It would be balanced and you would still have room for four screws, but probably not at 90 degree increments. Perhaps 70, 110, 70, 110 degree spacing.

  21. #60
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    MMMmmmmm home made tool porn...My favourite....

    Well done excellent work..


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