How can I drill into a ball bearing? - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Suggestion for holding -

    Drill a bit of flat stock for your desired hole size and counter sink. The flat is then flipped over. The side that will be holding down the ball now has a nice cup and you have a drill guide.

    Ted

  2. #22
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    This brings up my favorite shop joke. take a bearing ball about 3/4" or so, ask the guys if they can find the bottom on the ball. When they can't make one hand into a fist then lay the ball between 2 knuckles, now roll the ball down the grove between 2 fingers (slowly). The bottom will show up for all to see. Works even better if you have hairy knuckles. Reminds me I haven't done that for awile, I need to find some new victims.

  3. #23
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    Hey, the pre-threaded option!
    cool.
    Thanks, I only need two, but in the future, who knows

  4. #24
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    run a carbide end mill at 1000 rpm or higher using safety precautions, you can mill a hole into another M40 end mill doing it this way

    the idea is that the metal melts before you cut it

    done it many times to mill broken tools out of titanium billets weighing tons, should work for your scenario as well

    no need to tell you to be careful, i hope

  5. #25
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    I've drilled many hardened balls but they were smaller. .125 dia
    I use a small ball carbide burr to start the hole and a carbide drill. Works quite well
    Jim

  6. #26
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    No heat required. AND No fancy tools required
    Grind a flat on the top.
    Take a chunk of steel and put it in a coffee can.
    Drill a 1/2 hole part way in it, for the ball to rest in .
    Clamp the ball with a small C clamp.
    put the ball on the hole.
    fill the can with water till it covers the ball.
    Use a carbide masonary bit with as much speed as you can get out of the drill press. hold the clamp
    Drill and hold pressure till thee bit statrs to stall....hold it there and it will make chips.


    The water is to keep the silver solder from melting and letting the carbide loose.
    Rich

  7. #27
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    This place sells all kinds of steel balls. I got several big ones to deform the edges of holes before I fit bushings in.

    http://www.kingmetals.com/

  8. #28
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    This is what i use in my shop
    www.reglus.ch

    Expensif but the best

    good luck,

    greetings Anthony

  9. #29
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    Can't believe they still make the Reglus! Bought one at a machine shop going out of business sale two years ago for the princely sum of 10 bucks because no one knew what it was. Hell, I didn't either, but it came packed with a manual and I took a few minutes to read it. What a terrific thing. It sort of resembles a microscope. However, what looks like the eyepiece accepts a bushing sized for whatever drill you wish to use. If you haven't got the right size, bushings are easy to make. To continue the microscope analogy, small spheres you wish to drill fit in a machined funnel about where slides would be placed in an optical instrument. To use it, you place aforementioned ball in the funnel, then raise the work to the bushing so the ball is tightly captured. Take it to the drill press and drill away. Amaze your friends!
    The Reglus also has different fixtures for drilling dowels and such, plus a gravity operated protractor that you can clamp to some of the stuff you're drilling and neatly divide a set of holes. Of course, this isn't as accurate as a dividing head by a long shot, but if you just need a small handwheel, who cares.
    I'm wondering if something like this might be a nice Home Shop Machinist article someday but most HSM authors are way more knowledgeable than I.
    If anyone's interested, I'll try to post some pictures.

  10. #30
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    As mentioned before, I would also recommend using a Hi-Roc drill bit. Take a hand file and file a small flat after you have it chucked up in your lathe and before you drill it.

    If you need a source of balls I have allways been very happy with these guys.

    http://www.precisionballs.com/

    They will make balls out of nearly any material you can think of. They have all kinds of materials and sizes in stock.

    Depending on what you want to do with the ball after its drilled you may not want it to be annealed. If it's decorative... who cares, but if its a bearing surface, you would be better off leaving it in the hardened state.

    Mark

  11. #31
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    Well, I like reading what people are saying and I am learing a lot, but just to let you know, I heated the balls to a deep orange with propane, let them cool and they drilled very easily, they are decorative counter weights.

    Keep it coming though.

    [ 12-06-2005, 09:11 AM: Message edited by: trythis ]

  12. #32
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    I knew that would work.

  13. #33
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    Any well stocked ball bearing company will have soft,unheat treated ball bearings available. I had the same situation and found them at the local supplier. Machined like butter. I could case harden them if need be also.Why go thru the hassle trying to drill holes into hardened material? Best regards,Mark in Buffalo

  14. #34
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    I am too cheap (broke) to go buy new ones. There is a local hardware store thatsells them for 30 cents, and I was there and bought them, but I am glad to know that soft ones can be had, I wouldnt know that if I hadnt asked this question and that is why I love this board so much.

  15. #35
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    This was not the question and I have no personal experience with this but am told that one should never weld a ball bearing with anneling it first lest it react umm dramaticaly. Of course ya'll already new that...

  16. #36
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    "withOUT annealing it"
    sorry

  17. #37
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    Heat them to the critical and cool them very slowly Overnight if you can do it.

  18. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raul McCai View Post
    Heat them to the critical and cool them very slowly Overnight if you can do it.
    The original poster had 15 years to cool them VERY SLOWLY.

  19. Likes PeteM, digger doug liked this post

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