how to cut apart a spring brake - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Miranda View Post
    gbent,

    Thanks for your help. That's about where we are at so far. We have an enclosure that completely contains the piece. We have the can mounted to a rotary table. A nylon cylinder is pneumatically actuated to come down from the top and capture the top of the spring brake and only allows it to move about 1/4" when it cuts through. We have tried an abrasive wheel and it works but makes too much mess. This thing is going to be used in an R&D facility so it has to be fairly clean. We also tried using a couple of slides with a parting tool but as you already noted, when it cuts through one side it cocks and wedges the tool. I was thinking of trying a spindle with a jewelers saw. But your idea of adding shims may be the trick. I will give that some more thought. The only thing with that is the technician will have to open the door and reach in to place the shims in the cut. I will have to program in some kind of stop after the saw cuts through far enough to put the shims in place. I was hoping to make this a situation where you would load the part, hit the start button, and when it was done cutting you would release the cylinder that contains the top half of the can and then open the door when the spring is completely free of energy.

    Joe
    Could you incorporate something like the splitter on a table saw? I 100% agree you don't want someone opening the door until it is completely "defused".

  2. #42
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    Why not X Ray it

  3. #43
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    12 yr old thread. Since we never got an update on how the machine worked to did assemble the cans it is safe to assume Joe Miranda(OP) killed himself by working on something outside of a padded room.
    Dont look up people, the sky might fall.

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  5. #44
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    Yes, it IS an old thread... an excellent demonstration of 'necroposting'.

    I'm absolutely positively certain Joe is still with us, and doing fine, as he posted at 10am this morning.

    I believe that much of this thread exists because few people actually took the time to READ his posting, and his replies, they just blurted out their first thoughts.

    "I have to make a machine or come up with a process to cut the brakes apart for a spring brake manufacturer so they can inspect warranty returns. The brakes will already be off the vehicle. I can't do any damage to the internals of the brake. "

    This is all explicitly clear to me, yet it clearly WASN'T to all those who posted rather inconsiderate responses, and carried on betwixt themselves.

    This was not an amateur exercise on Joe's part, it was a professional circumstance wherin his resources were called upon to render a simple, easy-to-use, and safe process in the face of something that he clearly understood had dangerous potential energy within. Those who offered patronizing advice to 'run away' from the danger, simultaneously insulted Joe whilst proving their own insolence.

    His job, was to make a dangerous, but very necessary process possible in a safe manner for his customer. It is not his place to ask why, and telling him that the best solution is to 'thrown them in a lake', or all the other myriad of unviable suggestions prove the respondents' capacities to "read".

    Having worked on spring brake cannisters substantially larger, more powerful, and more dangerous than an ordinary truck actuator, I agree that it's rather dangerous, but the process is simple enough- it is to reverse the assembly process- captivate and slightly compress the spring, cut away the can, then gently release all pressure... and while this is all happening, make sure that there's plenty of armor containment around it, with nothing, and nobody inside the containment zone when there's a live can in process of breach.

    This process requires some substantial understanding of the internals, and also clear definition of what constitutes 'damage' when disassembled. If one has the ability to see the component disassembled, then designing a captivation rig, and a method of unfastening to release is not nearly as difficult, but getting one to be 'safe enough' for disassembly is a different story. My personal choice would be to get a half-dozen units (that were not of the 'testing required' status, and place ONE of them in a really hot fire... enough to destroy the temper of the spring and housing to cause it to release itself... after that, examine and literally reverse-engineer the containment and compression process, then affect a cutting method that will work.

    But as noted, this is a very old thread. Alas, some things seem to never change.

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  7. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by mr.roboto.1975 View Post
    Yes this is an old thread, but if I found it, others will too. I have a customer that is a mechanic at a garbage dump. One of their dozer drivers hit a can that someone had thrown in the trash, the spring went through his chest and killed him. Here's what I do..... there is a manmade pond deep in the woods. I throw them into the pond. It will take 5 or 10 years, but the can will rust out, and release the spring tension. If anything, the spring will end up a few feet into the mud. The likelihood of someone getting hit by the spring is infinitely small.
    Leave it for some one else to clean up ?

    God your a hack...an irresponsible one at that.

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  9. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    Leave it for some one else to clean up ?

    God your a hack...an irresponsible one at that.
    I guess he didnt care about the poor guy who pulls it up with a fishing line? Tosses the muck covered, partly rusted thing he just pulled out of the pond on the shore, just to have it explode and kill him. Poor guy just wanted to get a little trash out of nature and dies for it because some idiot

    As the saying goes: You cant fix stupid.
    Last edited by Rob F.; 09-19-2019 at 05:06 PM.

  10. #47
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    All these dire warnings from people who never had anything to do with maxi chambers.Ive even loosened the clamp rings and let them pop apart ......no drama like the imaginary ones .

  11. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveKamp View Post
    and place ONE of them in a really hot fire... enough to destroy the temper of the spring and housing to cause it to release itself...

    WHOA!! which is going to reach critical temp first, the sheet metal housing, or the heavy spring inside??? that is a terrible idea, not only the parts flying' at cha, but they are red hot shrapnel!!! good lord..

    you know, these things should NOT be discarded in general mixed scrap, or garbage, or a pond. the manufacturers and distributors should have a mandatory take back, just as they do for other hazardous items like lead acid batteries.

    P.S., Joe, tell us how it worked out!

  12. #49
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    I put them in a really hot fire......in a steel mill in China.

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  14. #50
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    That's the kind of fire I was referring to, John... ;-)


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