Need Powermatic 143 bandsaw info
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  1. #1
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    I bought one of these saws the other day and haven't yet found a manual for it, so I'm looking for a couple of pieces of information:

    1: What size blade does this saw use?

    2: What lubricant does the gearbox use?

    Hope one of you guys can help me out, as I know from posts that several of you have this saw.

    Thanks,
    Brad

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    Just out of curiosity, where did you find yours? I have been looking locally for one (DFW area) for some time.

    thanks,
    erik

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    I ran across this saw at an auction, and thought it would be a worthy replacement for my 14" Delta woodcutting saw. There's no comparison in terms of construction; now if I could only get it running (three phase, unfortunately)...

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    From my manual: Blade length is min 94", max 96". The transmission is filled with 1 1/2 pints of "40 weight" oil. Further it says the transmission is sealed and does not require an oil change. Hope this helps. These are nice little bandsaws. Too bad they are no longer part of the Powermatic line.
    David

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    David, thanks a lot. When I moved the saw a little oil ran out of the gearbox and I guessed it to be 30 or 40 weight. It looked clean and probably doesn't need to be changed, but I'll change it anyway so I'll know it's OK.

    Brad

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    I think you can find the manual by drilling a little bit into the Old Woodworking Machines site.

    http://www.owwm.com/MfgIndex/Publications.asp?ID=655

    There is a 900k version and a 6 Mb version...not sure what the difference is right now.

    They are great solid bandsaws for the size...IMHO the stoutest 14" saw you can buy.

    I would use non-detergent oil in the transmission.

  7. #7
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    Hi Matt. I thought I might hear from you as I know you have a high opinion of these saws. Thanks for the tip on the manual; I wasn't aware of the Old Woodworking Machines site. Right now I'm considering my options to power the machine, and I may go with your approach and put a home-brew phase converter inside somewhere.

    Brad

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    Brad, I don't know if you dug into the archives, or even if there is any worthwhile info in there...the converter that my Dad and I built for his saw was an auto-start static...I can supply a few more details if interested.

    It made sense for him as it is his only 3 phase machine and a bandsaw doesn't require a whole lot of horsiepower.

  9. #9
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    Yes, I'm generally aware of what has been posted about building static and rotary phase converters, and I could build a static converter for the saw (I'll talk to you if I do). But another option I have is to swap the 3 phase bandsaw motor with my 1 phase drill press motor and then run the drill press from a VFD (giving me variable speed where I need it). This latter approach is the one I prefer if I can keep the $$$ low.

    Brad

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    I bought and moved a Powermatic 143 a few months ago. Removed table & trunnions & blade tilt screw. Put two 10’ 2x8’s against pickup bed and laid saw on its back and slid into truck. When it tipped into the bed, the 2x8’s slid in with it. Put 2x4 against top of gearbox cover and front of truck bed to keep it from sliding into the front of the bed and bending the tension screw. Plus lots of straps.
    Unloaded the same way and gearbox cover had lots of oil in it and, when we stood the saw up, the oil got on the belts. There’s not a good way to stop the leaks. The oil fill is on the operator side and the vent is on the opposite side. You might tilt it to the operator’s left but there’s a flange sticking out of the base that would mess with your ability to slide it around and that’s the narrow side. I’d drain the gearbox next time.
    30-100 non detergent was my best choice at NAPA. I drained the old oil (clean!) and refilled. I think there’s a level plug on the right facing the gearbox. Oil ran out after my estimated 1 1/2 pints.
    The PO had changed to a 2 HP motor and a 3/8” step pulley. I changed back to a 2” pulley for a 1/2” belt.
    Just for info, the PO said it wouldn’t go into low on the gearbox. I didn’t worry too much about that and figured it was fixable. I would have worried if it was locked up. At home I tried shifting while turning the belts and it changed. The belts were on high and the saw was screaming fast! I checked and someone had added a high-low tag turned upside down so it had been in low all along. Speeds are from 40 to 3000 rpm. Belts give a 4:1 change so the gearbox ratio from high to low is 18.75 to 1. High on belts and low on gearbox is about 140 rpm which is good for most metals. Just changing the gearbox to high gives 3000 fpm for wood.


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