OT: What makes Moglice Hazardous
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  1. #1
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    Hi There,

    I was talking to Devitt Machinery Co. about purchasing
    some Moglice and I was told that I would have to pay
    the additional "hazardous material" shipping fees.

    So, what is in Moglice that makes it so "hazardous"
    to ship?

    Thanks in advance!
    -Blue Chips-
    Webb

  2. #2
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    It's a charge they make for everything you can't eat these days. They even post a "hazardous material" charge on atmospheric gasses.

    Uncured Moglice components do contain chemicals that can be nasty on exposed skin. The cured stuff is no worse than any other cured two part material.

    For the record, Moglice is attractive at first glance to neophytes because its sold as having an advantage: you don't have to machine worn parts for alignment and go through all that fitting. When you consider that Moglice requires some preliminary machining, heavy garnet blasting, grinding of the opposing way surface, careful positioning of the axis elements, damming and risering of the moglice cavity, injection, drilling for oil passages, some minor final fitting, and the installation of very effective way wipers, the economic advantage to useing it it is just about a wash compared to an efficient conventional machine tool re-build with a scraper.

    Don't get me wrong; Moglice properly used is an excellent product and it delivers on its claims. The point I was making is its economic and time advantage is small and it's intolerant of dirt, small chips, and wear products.

  3. #3
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    Hi Forrest,

    I take all that you said to heart. One of these days,
    (when I have enough money) I'll attend one of your
    scraping seminars.

    Thanks!
    -Blue Chips-
    Webb

  4. #4
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    Hazardous materials--yea, the bottle of Dykem I ordered from MSC last month was shipped in a separate container as a "hazardous material". Extra shipping charge applied that was more than the cost of the Dykem. This month some new band saw blades arrived with a big sticker plastered on the box saying "sharp objects inside".

    Good grief.

    Forrest--thanks for your comments regarding the issues with using Moglice.

  5. #5
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    I actually asked them what in the moglice was hazardous when I ordered it and I think they said the cleaner and the mold release as both have volatiles in them.

    Used this stuff on my old artisan to replace the nut and so far so good. Keep it lubed and it should last a long time! It did scare me though when I went to break loose the nut the first time. I was thinking I had just epoxied the nut right to the shaft. But it popped loose with a little more push.

  6. #6
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    new band saw blades arrived with a big sticker plastered on the box saying "sharp objects inside".
    That should keep some oily lawyer from telling how his poor client "Reached into the box, and was cut by a razor-sharp blade put there by the shipper" [img]smile.gif[/img]

  7. #7
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    So, what is in Moglice that makes it so "hazardous" to ship?
    It's how Devitt Machinery gets to charge an additional $15 for shipping on a $50 Moglice kit :rolleyes:

    I bought a Moglice 1000 kit from them about a year and a half ago, and was a bit annoyed about the hazmat fee.

    Moglice is two-party epoxy impregnated with molybdenum disulfide (Moglice Putty) or Teflon (Moglice 1000). I've bought tons of nasty hazardous chemicals from MSC, Enco, McMaster and the like, and never had to pay a hazmat fee.

    its economic and time advantage is small and it's intolerant of dirt, small chips, and wear products.
    It's really nice for casting very low-friction, nearly zero-backlash leadscrew nuts.

  8. #8
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    Actually I think ups or whoever ships the product collects the hazmat fee.

  9. #9
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    Tried a new lumber supplier a couple years ago. The first load, white oak, and maple, came with safety data sheets. :rolleyes:

    smt

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    turkite?
    forrest

  11. #11
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    I think ups or whoever ships the product collects the hazmat fee.
    I just got a plating kit from Caswell: 15 lbs of concentrated cupric acid, acetone, and all sorts of other nasty, "known to the State of California," cancer-causing carcinogens.

    Total UPS shipping was $12.99. So if UPS tacked-on a hazmat fee, it wasn't much.

    Devitt Machinery, on the other hand, adds a $15 hazmat fee for a 50 gram container of epoxy.

  12. #12
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    Whippin': Ive always heard "Trucite" pronounced "tur'-site" and Googles at 64,000 hits. "Turkite" must be a popular variant because it Googles at 2100 hits.

    Turcite is also good stuff but it must be carefully applied if good longevity is to be obtained. Here you have to machine, scrape, and fit after the stuff is applied and fit the machine withe really effective way wipers as with Moglice.

    Turcite on hard ways lasts hundreds of thousands of cycles if properly lubricated giving five or more times the wear life of well lubricated cast iron against cast iron and 20 times that obtainable from neglected way surfaces allowed to run dirty. Turcite against cast iron hase about half the life of cast iron against cast iron unless the wipers are maintained and a one-shop lube system is installed.

    Turcite as I said is good stuff but you have to dance the whole dance when if comse to its application. Machine Tool Services is an outfit that specializes in Turcite and its application but their website seems to be down.

  13. #13
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    Had a visit from the VAT inspectors last week (Inland Revenue) They asked some health and safety questions over the phone before they dare enter the premises. I think the (developed) world has gone health and safety mad.
    Steve.

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    Alowing it to contact any surface of a machine tool will instantly compromise the machines integrity.

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    the economic advantage to useing it it is just about a wash compared to an efficient conventional machine tool re-build with a scraper.
    Just a question about that statement. When you do a machine rebuild say a lathe bed regrind and saddle refit don't you need to use a product like moglice to get the saddle back up to original height again so the lead and feed screws are back in alignment again???

    When I enquired about a lathe rebuild many years ago the company I asked told me they used a metal spray to do the job...

  16. #16
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    I want one of those "one-shop" lubricators. Lessee, head down in the morning, hit the lights, hit the one-shop lube, good to go!

    Or is does the term describe a less sophisticated system than the one I am imagining: like when you go down and the bottom of the parts wash 30gal drum has rusted out, and the whole shop is, well, sort of, "lubricated".

    smt, ducking and running...

  17. #17
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    Moglice is an epoxy resin based product. It is purported to cure very quickly and retain good structural properties. The way you get epoxy to behave like this is to use an amine type curative like DETA or TETA. Trouble is, these are seriously poisonous chemicals that can be absorbed directly into the blood through skin contact or inhalation. The target organs are the liver and kidneys. Now I'm pretty slack about chemical exposures myself, but I give TETA and DETA respect and wear gloves whenever I handle it. If I'm working indoors with it and notice the fumes, I'll wear a respirator.

    People get all worried about painting 2-part polyurethane paints, which I do almost every work day. Truth is, most people, certainly more than 99%, are not sensitive to the iso catalyst and don't need to worry. They are not going to have a reaction unless they are allergic.

    The draconian warnings are there to cover the manufacturer's a$$ just in case you are one of those tiny minority who happen to be allergic.

    But it's different with DETA and TETA and the like. EVERYBODY is at risk with these chemicals! They are highly toxic, not allergenic to a small minority. Different animal altogether.

    Yes, there are 'safety' epoxies that are low toxicity. But you would be suprised at how common the really toxic curatives are. All of the Devcon repar putty products for instance use TETA (triethylene tetramine) as the hardener.

    Just my $.02

    Jimbo

  18. #18
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    Ringer, that is the million dollar question isn't it? I think there was alot of scrappin', not scrapin' going on.

  19. #19
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    Hey that stuff sounds good ..
    what's the name brand its sold under in the uk as ...
    could do with making quite a few nuts here.

    all the best..mark

  20. #20
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    Naive question here but I've never seen Moglice, is it similar to Belzona?


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