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  1. #21
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    Mark,

    The Fein random orbital oscillates at 7500, but when in contact with the work the pad doesn't spin at 7500. That Fein looks like an excellent choice for driving the diamond polishing pads. I'm going to check out mounting the hook and loop pads on a vibratory sander. Thanks!

  2. #22
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    surplusjohn;
    i beg to differ with you but the egyptians were the pinnacle of the bronze age.
    my grandmother had some urns that a lady brought to her in the 1920's from egypt.
    in the 1960's one was broken by one of the grands, not me i swear!
    a friend of hers took the urn to Armco Steel in Ashland Ky to attempt a repair. it was unsucessful and all they could tell her it was bronze but nothing that modern bronze would weld (braze?) to...jim

  3. #23
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    Jpfalt, yeah the Fein doesn't spin at 7500. I am frankly not sure how the rpm ratings on orbital sanders are to be interpreted. The Fein is not a run-of-the-mill sander and it's rating may not even be meaningful to compare to others... I don't know. But I've also used the diamond pads on a cheapo air random orbit disc sander rated at (I think) 7,000 rpm no-load, and it also slows way down with even a slight load.

    That aside, I am not sure that I would recommend the Fein in general. I think it's a tad over-rated, considering it's a $400 sander, and thus 2-4 times the cost of alternatives. It's pretty heavy, loud, and vibrates quite a bit. It's advertised as "dustless" but that is bull (no big surprise there of course.) However, it does feel well-built and seems like it'll probably last a lifetime. Also note that it takes somewhat non-standard 8-hole paper (rather than 6-hole), which I find to be a big PITA. However, the only thing I have to directly compare it to is a 10 year-old beat-up porter cable disc sander, and that's not really a fair comparison. But I think most major makers (Bosch, etc) now make a 6" random orbit "dustless" roughly like the Fein, and a lot cheaper. But I haven't tried any of them.

    I've been thinking my next sander is going to be an air-powered equivalent, ie. a high-quality, random-orbit, "dustless" like a Dynabrade or something similar.

  4. #24
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    As far as dual action sanders go I have a Hutchins.20 years ago that was the Cadilac of sanders.It still is smooth but it does weight more than others.This was one case where I spent alot at the time and never was disappointed.

  5. #25
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    I use diamond grits up to a 100,000 with my Ultra Tech Faceting machine and never had any problems polish just about anything with the diamond paste that I use.

    Jerry

  6. #26
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    i beg to differ with you but the egyptians were the pinnacle of the bronze age.
    toolmaker, would bronze make a good chisel for granite?

  7. #27
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    i belive that the egyptians built out of sandstone primarily, a sedimentary stone, and a hard bronze tool would be sufficent for that.

    granite is a metamorphic rock generally found in areas where the earths mantle helped form it.

    how would YOU accomplish such sculpture by rubbing stone against stone?

    how would YOU cut a harder stone to make a tool to create such work?

    i think a lot has been lost in antiquity and to generalize or speculate about a culture thats 4000 to 10,000 years old doesn't give those artisians much credit for creating what they did.

    what basis do you have for your stone to stone technique?...jim

  8. #28
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    On the ancient stone working theme, this article about the stone walls of Cuzco might be of interest:-
    http://www.davideandrea.com/personal/ideas/inca_stones/

    In ancient China they shaped jade by using sand as an abrasive. Holes were trepanned using bamboo as a core drill, fed with sand.

  9. #29
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    history and the stone on stone technique has been tested out and the forms you see in the finished piece are possible with this approach, ie generally convex shapes like you could get with a rasp. There is probably good documentaion in the for of paintings and written documentation in both Egyptian and other cultures. The stone used for scultures was often Serpentine, and other very hard stone. Not to say they did not use sandstone, the Spinx is a natural sandstone or limestone outcropping that was cut down and added to. I will try to dig up some info.

  10. #30
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    good i would like to see that.
    but dont use heirogliphics i dont have access to a roseatta stone..jim

  11. #31
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    You might look for a counter top shop that specializes in granite and marble. Polishing marble is quick so the cost should be low. If you get it to Chicago, I'll get it on a polisher for you for free.

  12. #32
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    The pyramids are made from a very soft limestone, which is why they had a cladding of polished harder limestones what that was stolen to build some of Cairo. Same goes for the Sphinx. Serpentine is soft, can be carved with a knife. I've seen a beautifully carved Egyptian seated figure about six feet high, polished, and made from gabbro, the sort of stuff that rings when hit. I'd have been impressed if it had been cut with modern tools. Copper or bronze chisels like were used on the pyramids wouldn't look at it. Granite is an igneous rock. You're in the presence of a geologist now guys .......... sorry.

    Mike

  13. #33
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    As long as you have plenty of time and cheap labor you can grind just about anything with just about anything else.

    For the Egyptians, bronze was a serious improvement over wood and stone for drilling holes for large block splitting. The technique was to drill holes and then drive in dried wooden pegs. Boiling water was used to swell the peg and split stone blocks. Something similar is done today for quarrying using drifts and wedges to split stone blocks.

    To reduce large surfaces they used a tchnique called pecking where you used a hard stone and hit a local area to crush the surface. This worked for sandstone, limestone and granite. The pecking stones had distinctive marking on the working surface. Surface finishing was done with sandstone for limestone, granite and obsidian. One of the tools I learned to make several years ago was a ceremonial obsidian blade that looked a lot like a boomerang in shape. It was mounted on the end of a wood shaft. For manufacture, the obsidian was taken to rough shape with sandstone hammerstones and then the front and bakc faces were ground on sandstone grinding plate. Then pressure flaking was used to remove the display face of the blade. The back side was left as-ground. Many flintknappers today "conserve material" by sawing and grinding blade blanks and then pressure flaking to put on the finished surface.

    Back to the bronze, the biggest benefit was that when a tool became deformed badly or broken, it could be remelted and worked into a new tool with minimal loss of material. With wood and stone tools, once worn or broken all you could do was throw it out.

  14. #34
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    the stone I was thinking of must not of been serpentine because it was extremely hard, requiring lots of time with air chisels to worry away the surface.

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    Get high-end finish on your natural stone through professional marble cleaning and polishing services of Fabra Cleen experts. I hired them for my living room marble and tile cleaning and the solutions they used gives a new look to natural stone.

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    Reported as spam.


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