Safety Glasses, Warning and question - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Here's one source on-line. I think I have another, if/when I find it, I'll post it also.

    http://safetyglasses.com/

  2. #22
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    Folks here laugh about it, but I always wear safety glasses, & steel toes when I mow the lawn and run the weed-eater. As far as I am concerned, those are probably the 2 most dangerous activities most people do, as far as eye injuries go...

  3. #23
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    I agree Davis. The industrial-strength line trimmers can knock a small stone 30+ feet. I've seen landscapers break windows like that. Tilt the head the wrong way so that the rotation is towards you and serious injury is a real possibility.

  4. #24
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    Folks here laugh about it, but I always wear safety glasses, & steel toes when I mow the lawn and run the weed-eater. As far as I am concerned, those are probably the 2 most dangerous activities most people do, as far as eye injuries go...
    I may not always wear steel toes, but I definitely wear safety glasses while mowing or using the weed eater. And ear protection, especially with the weed eater. Last year, I bought tome Peltor "Work Tunes" hearing protectors so I can listen to the radio while doing yard work. [img]smile.gif[/img]

  5. #25
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    Yes, you are extremely lucky! Speaking from experience, cornea transplants, lens implants, trabeculectomies , vitrectomies, can be a real PITA! Best of luck...

  6. #26
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    I have to wear glasses all the time so I always have some protection. When I am in the shop I use safety glasses that fit as close to my face as I can get. Chips will still get past them at times but is sure stops most the stuff from hiting my eyes. I use plastic lenses in my glasses and they won't shatter like glass.

    When I worked in a truck shop years ago I had to open a trailer side door. Some stuff inside had leaned against the door. When I raised the handle it pushed out of my hand and hit me in the eye pushing the lens out of the frame and against my eye. If the lens had broke I would be short one eye now. As it was I had a sore black eye for a while. That sure woke me up for eye protection.

  7. #27
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    Here's the other -
    http://safetyglassesusa.com/

  8. #28
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    I picked up a pair of clear shooting glasses with reading lenses at Cabela's last week. $20.
    A good option if you need some immediately, but I wasn't crazy about the style.

  9. #29
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    I think threads like this (or the initial post, at least) should be put either on top, or in a special place.
    This is a dangerous trade, and I've seen some pretty terrible accidents that could have been prevented by rules being followed.

  10. #30
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    My vision is such that I must wear reading glasses for reading or close work. Fortunately, I can make use of simple magnifiers from the drug store rack. In the shop, I have long wrestled with the safety glasses issue -- not whether to wear them, but what glasses to wear. I have tried many pairs that are on the market. To me, the bifocal ones with magnifying inserts are useless. What has finally come my way has overcome all my objections to other safety glasses. These new glasses are Mag-Safe Magnifying Safety Glasses. I bought mine from Grobet USA (1-800-920-7095 in Boston). They are plastic, and cost $15 a pair. They come in a range from 1 to 3 diopters, in .25 diopter increments. They are lightweight, full lensed, and have clear side shields. The lenses are extremely clear and, to me, distortion free. The one point which isn't yet clear is how scratch resistant they are. They fit the head well, like good eyeglasses, and easily fit under the welding helmet. They are marked as meeting or exceeding ANSI-Z-87 specs.

  11. #31
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    I burned my right eyelid pretty well about an hour ago. And was wearing safety glasses.

    It'll be fine, just stings a bit, ()and no eyelash). Not looking for sympathy. But I remembered toolmkr's last comment, and thought that a new post that puts this thread back on top might be a good thing to do if it made someone else a little bit more careful tomorrow.

    I was using a forge to make helixes from 1/4" plate. 8" diameter. Pulled a piece out, put it on the die and started hammering. I had already made a few and was sweating from the forge heat. Looking down at the work, the safety glasses and my regular glasses slid down about an inch. The plate forms scale fast, and hammering a helix sends it flying in every direction. That little gap was enough to let a piece drop in.

    These are the style of glasses that have a little horizontal shelf on top that covers that gap. But my head was tilted forward and kind of sweaty from the forge and the glasses slid forward -- never considered that risk before. Next time the ladies leave the table to powder their noses I may ask if I can join them

    Some of the scale popped onto my head too. Glad I'm not bald [img]smile.gif[/img]

  12. #32
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    I have had these discussions many times over the past 2 weeks. Seems like everyone has had a hot chip brand their eyelid or some other near mishap.
    I got my Elvex bifocal safety glasses, seem to work well, but I have not really used them yet. Eye is pretty much healed, still some internal clots but it did not rebleed, surgen did a good job with the stiches, no much of a scar, so I got off easy.

  13. #33
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    John--Hope your eye heals well and you have no long term problems.


    A long time ago when I did my apprecticeship an "old school" toolmaker told me a very special piece of information that I share with the "kids" in the shop these days. " You can walk on a wooden leg, but can't see out of a glass eye." Truely are words to live by.

    Marty

  14. #34
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    Hope you heal up nicely John.
    When I was young and working in the first machine shop I suffered an eye injury even though I had on safety glass's and a shield.
    I guess that made an impression and I have always been well aware of eye protection.
    What has worked for me for many years is to wear safety glass's and one of those Opti-Visors. When I need to read my mics or a veneer all I have to do is tilt my head down a little and I can see great! But don't get one that is too strong.
    Michael

  15. #35
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    I have not had Lasik, but I wear contact lenses, and am at the age where I like the bifocals for up close work.

    I have gotten my bifocal safety glasses from McMaster-Carr, www.mcmaster.com. They sound like the ones that Marty Feldman describes, five posts up from this one. I really like them. Very comfortable and well made. From page 1685 of the current online catalog, here is what McMaster says:


    Magnifying Wraparound Safety Glasses
    • Our bifocal safety glasses bring items into focus while protecting your eyes
    • Frame and temples are polycarbonate
    • A rubber nosepiece and temple tips provide comfort
    • Temple length is not adjustable;
    temple-to-temple width is 5 1/2"
    • Lens is scratch resistant
    To select the correct magnification level (also known as diopter), subtract 35 from your age and insert a decimal point between the two numbers. Choose the magnification level that is closest to that number.
    Magnification Lens Frame
    Level Color Color Each

    1.0 Clear Gray 2882T11 $15.37

    1.5 Clear Gray 2882T13 $15.37

    2.0 Clear Gray 2882T15 $15.37

    2.5 Clear Gray 2882T17 $15.37

    3.0 Clear Gray 2882T19 $15.37

  16. #36
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    I made a set of prescription safety glasses before I bought my UVEX glasses.I used some old lenses that I had from semi rimless frames that are held in place by "fishing line" I melted a small hole with a hot wire through the top of the safety glasses.Attached the lenses with the line snug through the hole,tied the knot,melted the loose ends.They work pretty well,other than the lenses can move a little backwards in the frames when your not looking down at your work.



    I bought a pair of prescription UVEX safety glasses several years ago from SPORTRX.

    SPORTRX

    They don't list the UVEX safety glasses anymore,but maybe you have to ask.They have a number of other prescription sports eyeglasses and goggles which might be of interest though they aren't cheap,neither are your eyes.

  17. #37
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    Re: 2LMKR
    A long time ago when I did my apprecticeship an "old school" toolmaker told me a very special piece of information that I share with the "kids" in the shop these days. " You can walk on a wooden leg, but can't see out of a glass eye." Truely are words to live by.
    He omitted one - "You can eat with false teeth".

  18. #38
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    I've bought a couple of sets of bifocal safety glasses on eBay - one set are also sunglasses. They averged $15 deliveried. This morning there are ~50 hits there.

    Dave

  19. #39
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    Hello,
    this tread is already a little older but safety concerns or reminders are never getting old.

    I have been a machine operator, shop manager and engineer for many years now. I was sick of telling people to use their safety glasses often using air-pressure to clean part so I developed a safety shield which gets installed right at the air-pressure gun. It works great and has 3 benefits. No one can miss to wear it, it keeps you safe of coolant and aerosols as well as flying swarf and debris and it keeps she shop floor clean and the debris; coolant in the machine.

    Users call it "First defense safety protection."

    You can check it out and if you are interested let me know. +ProFace by PJ Development | Work Safety OSHA | Germany

    Thanks Patrick

  20. #40
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    Wishes on your recovery. I have bought safety glasses recently it works well.


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