Tricks of the Trade - Page 2
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 2 of 28 FirstFirst 123412 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 542
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Lawn Guylin, Noo Yawk
    Posts
    2,692
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    20
    Likes (Received)
    53

    Post

    On the subject of bearings:

    Before you repack and install, RESIST the temptation to whizzz the bearing like a siren with compressed air. Nothing will kill a bearing sooner than to run it dry at high speed.

    Instead, after the final rinse in clean solvent, blow it out ACROSS the bearing, holding both races together. After applying grease "a la George" slowly roll the races, balls, rollers, cages around to make sure all surfaces are coated.

    When installing, DONT use brass or aluminum to drive the races on, as little slivers can easily chip off and work their way into the bearing. Better choice is a piece of mild steel like keystock, which is tough enough to take the beating, but still softer than the bearing races.

    Finally, running in is always advised: the balls and rollers need a chance to actually roll and form a "track" for themselves, instead of just skating around.

    A few RPMs both forward then reverse for a minute or two, then increase to 50, 100, 250, 500, 1000, etc is the way to go. IMHO, of course.

  2. Likes itsmeBernie liked this post
  3. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Lynn, Mass-a-chewsit
    Posts
    305
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    2

    Post

    Ferrous,
    Im laughing my butt off right now thinking of how many times I've heard that progressivly higher and higher whine in the shop.
    Hear it and have to go yell at the nitwit doing it.
    jack

  4. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    1,402
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    6

    Post

    Another danger of spinning dry bearings with the air gun: if you're holding the bearing on your fingers, and it siezes, best case scenario is some very bad friction burns, worst case-missing fingers.

    RAS

  5. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Rochelle,IL,USA
    Posts
    2,338
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    75
    Likes (Received)
    87

    Post

    Nawwww. I neeeeeever eeeever took a carbide insert with a through hole and stuck it on a allen wrench just to blow on it with an air nozzle to get it spinning a million rpm to irritate my co-workers with that God-awful whistle.

    Nor did I ever take a piece of welding wire, wrap electrical tape around it to from a cone, sharpen the tip making a blow-gun dart, stick it in a 5 foot length of tubing and proceed to use the shop air nozzle to shoot the said dart into a wooden door at least a 1/2 inch.

    DryCreek-
    I never understood why it was not reaming to size, so the metal slug would be a slight interference fit?
    Good question. One possible cause may have been trying to ream out .015". If I get a reamer constantly going oversize, sometimes it helps to ream it, say .003-.005 under your finish size, then there is less chance of the final reamer going over. But if you don't happen to have a reamer that's under by that amount, try running the reamer slower, use a heavy cutting oil, that nasty black sulpher oil is my choice, and experiment with how hard you feed the reamer.


    Have to mill an angle on a lot of parts?

    I've found that "angle parallels" are well worth the time to make them. I use 1/8 - 3/16 1018 x 1-1/2" cut and mill to 3" or 4" long and then rough saw out a 90 deg. notch at the needed angle and then mill using a sine bar to finsh. Relieve the milled corner with a band saw. My 45 deg. angle gets used every week for milling those 45 corners on parts. Just set up on the first part and because the angles are a notch instead of those parallel sets that you buy that are wedges that don't stop a part at a specific height, you pop the part in, mill it, swap in the next part. If your parts need a long angle milled on them, I make the parallels up in pairs. Each one goes against each vise jaw. Beats tilting your B.P. head.

    Skinny parallels:

    That strapping that you cut off of skids and throw away, save some. I use it for skinny parralels when I have to drill holes too close to the part edge that it would drill into normal width parallels. (not that I have ever drilled into a parallel).

    They also make great springs for keeping parallels against vise jaws. Just bend them to make a snug fit against your parallels and now you can open and close your vise with out those stinking chips getting behind your parallels.

    Also use them for shim stock. They are usually .025" thick.


    Steve

  6. Likes alexhawker, Inventorie, itsmeBernie, 9100 liked this post
  7. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    11,202
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5283
    Likes (Received)
    3355

    Post

    I guess most know this one, but if you get chatter then parting off, use the live center and tailstock. If the work piece doesn't have a hole put something in between that is center drilled. Release the tension when the piece is close to falling off.

    Thick rubber strips are pretty good at reducing chatter when machining tubes. Even wet rags can work good. Just gotta watch that they don't get caught on anything.

    When setting many tools in the QCT, set the parting tool first. Also make sure the compound is set at the angle you need before you start setting them up. :rolleyes:

    I think my favorite tool is a HSS bit I ground into a 1" long boring bar that I can plunge right in without making a hole first. It can also face in and out. Works great in plastics and aluminum. Not much good for harder materials though.

  8. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Country
    CANADA
    State/Province
    Saskatchewan
    Posts
    10,222
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1392
    Likes (Received)
    3674

    Post

    I've found that reamers will ream about .0005" smaller if you use WD40 instead of tapping fluid or oil.

    As for a reamer reaming oversize, the drilled hole is most likely not very accurately positioned (drills being what they are), unless the drilled hole is bored or straightened up with an endmill.

    The face of the work needs to be square to the reamer. A floating holder for a reamer will also help it to ream size on, if your chucks are otherwise out of whack a little bit.

    So for a reasonably accurate hole, I drill maybe .030 undersize, then find an old, but resharpened endmill (which are typically undersize and not a lot of good for much), and carefully "bore" the drilled hole with it. Leave maybe .005" for reaming, which I find is really nice allowance for best results with a reamer.

  9. Likes itsmeBernie liked this post
  10. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    MASS
    Posts
    81
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    4

    Post

    We use cutting oil in aerosol cans where I work. How many times have you knocked the can off the machine and broken off the tube for the spray nozzle rendering the can useless? What I do is take the cap cut a hole in the top for you’re finger to press the button, and drill a hole in the side of the cap for the nozzle tube extends through. Wrap some electrical tape around the cap where it meets the can to prevent it form coming off and you are all set, no more broken tubes.
    Another post mentioned a way to turn a long thin piece. One simple way is to use a counter bore without the pilot mounted in the tailstock. The only drawback is that you are limited to the pilot hole dimension.

  11. Likes Whittler Kev, Pathogen, itsmeBernie liked this post
  12. #28
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Weirsdale, FL
    Posts
    1,777
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    172

    Post

    Keep some mineral spirits in an oil can for quick cleanups. You will us a lot less of it than trying to pour it out of a can.

    When cleaning something, use a clean paper towel -- when using a rag which may or may not be clean, you will never get a part cleaner than the rag!

  13. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    240
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    7

    Post

    Years ago we had some odd shaped (out of square) parts to machine and drill holes in. The "old guy" in the shop went over to his tool box and pulled out a couple of gear sections. What he had done was taken a flat gear 6" dia. or so and about 3/4" thick then cut it in half. Machined the flats down about an inch on each side. Then when you mesh the teeth together the two flats become adjustable. Just put the good side of the part against the fixed jaw of your vice and the meshed gear on the other and it will adjust to your part. Will work on some pretty severe angles, just take it easy on the cutting.

    Keep the tips coming,
    I really enjoy this site. [img]smile.gif[/img]

    Michael

  14. Likes Inventorie, itsmeBernie, 9100 liked this post
  15. #30
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Country
    CANADA
    State/Province
    Saskatchewan
    Posts
    10,222
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1392
    Likes (Received)
    3674

    Post

    That's a cool idea. Maybe a piece of rack gear and half of another gear would work even better, especially if you bolted the rack to the back jaw.

  16. Likes itsmeBernie liked this post
  17. #31
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    240
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    7

    Post

    Never thought about the rack gear but that would work out great and take less space in the vice.

    Like I said I love this sight.

    Michael

  18. Likes itsmeBernie liked this post
  19. #32
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Rochelle,IL,USA
    Posts
    2,338
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    75
    Likes (Received)
    87

    Post

    I agree, the rack gear was a stroke of genius. I'll start looking tomorrow. Now I saw that gear just the other day.....

  20. Likes itsmeBernie liked this post
  21. #33
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Antelope Valley,Calif.,US of A
    Posts
    115
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    2

    Post

    Chuck up a piece of bar in your lathe, and turn the OD to clean up (actual diameter doesn't matter). Set your height gage on the cross slide, and measure to the top of the bar. Subtract half of the bar diameter from your height gage reading and write that number in a convenient place. Now you can set your tools on, above or below center with your height gage. Some lathes have a flat surface on the carriage where the follow rest mounts that is more convenient for boring tools. For upside down tools, threading ect., mount the tip of your height gage upside down, and zero it out on the surface plate with an appropriate size block.
    Robert

  22. Likes Whittler Kev, 9100 liked this post
  23. #34
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Casselberry, FL
    Posts
    485
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    48
    Likes (Received)
    11

    Post

    Quick and easy edgefinder without removing an endmill- creep up to the edge of the material or the vise, slip a strip of paper between it and the rotating end mill and hold it- keep creeping up until the paper is torn away- raise the quill and move half the cutter diameter and set zero.

    When parting off a piece with a hole in it and not using a center, I stop when I'm just about through, grab a smaller drill and put in the chuck, slide the tailstock over, and then finish parting- the piece now falls off and is hanging coveniently on the drill and is right there to retrieve, instead of being slung into the huge chip forest behind the lathe. Don't tell me that you've never lost a small piece and had to remake it...

  24. Likes itsmeBernie liked this post
  25. #35
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Weirsdale, FL
    Posts
    1,777
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    172

    Post

    As an addition to Robert's height gage to find the centerline for positioning the cuttting edge of tool bits, I took a 1.5" cube of steel, drilled and tapped the corner of one face 3/8-16 and inserted a piece of threaded rod. Then I made a 1" diameter steel disk with a 3/8-16 threaded hole. I spun the disk down such that the bottom of the disk is at C/L dimension from the base of the steel block and lock with a jam nut. Whenever I install a new tool bit, I adjust the tool holder so that the cutting tip just touches the bottom of the disk.

  26. #36
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    240
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    7

    Post

    ONLY 34 Tricks of the Trade out there.

    This topic may have been the subject of another thread. But seems to me there there should be alot more than this. There have been books written on this very subject. Not everyone can aford these.

    Lets see if those of us in the "trade" can help out some newbies and get a few more (pages of tricks) listed here.

    I've learned alot already, been machining nearly 20 years. NEVER to old or smart to learn something new.

    Michael

    Here is another trick:
    Need a .0005 shim? Soak the paper off of the tin foil wrapper in a pack of cigarettes. (use the tin foil) [img]smile.gif[/img]

  27. Likes itsmeBernie liked this post
  28. #37
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Southeast Michigan
    Posts
    6,554
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    241
    Likes (Received)
    1453

    Post

    Posted this on the HSM site too, but yah.

    When power tapping on a CNC machine without flood coolant, put a tin can of coolant on the bed somewhere. Program your machine to go and "dip" after one or two tapped holes.

    -Jacob

  29. Likes itsmeBernie, 9100 liked this post
  30. #38
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    New Haven, CT
    Posts
    3,499
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    44
    Likes (Received)
    677

    Post

    For cutting alluminum, go down to Home Depot, and buy the WD-40 in a 1gal alluminum can. Then buy the little $1.50 spray bottle as well as a funnel. When ever cutting alluminum spray a little of it on it and the stuff will cut like butter.

    Adam

  31. #39
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Country
    CANADA
    State/Province
    Saskatchewan
    Posts
    10,222
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1392
    Likes (Received)
    3674

    Post

    When drilling brass or bronze, remove the helical rake angle inside the flute of your twist drill to eliminate the tendency for the tool to hog in to the work.

    Just grind a little flat along the inside edge of the flute, to try to make the cutting face at 90 degrees to the drill axis.

  32. #40
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Posts
    141
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    1

    Post

    When indicating something round for center and to big to swing indicator, use edgefinder.
    Step 1) Start at roughly 9:00 find edge then move to center.
    Step-2 ) move over in y axis to 6:00 do not move x axis find edge and then move back to center.
    Go back to step one and start over. Do this 4 times and you will be on center. Actually in most cases three times and you get there.


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •