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  1. #41
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    for settin a lathe tool to center take a 6" scale and slightly clamp the scale between the tool and workpiece. if above center the scale will be pitched away from you, looking towards the chuck,if below center the scale will be pitched towards towards you. if on center the scale will be verticle.

    to cut a keyway without indicating to center touch the cutter off and slightly raise the table and enter the cut about 1/8" past the cutter centerline then move the table off the cutter and stop the spindle.
    touch the cut you just made with your index finger, this is assuming you still have your index finger, if you are off center you will feel that one side feels deeper than the other adjust to where both feel the same. then you will be on center.

    if you have trouble with chatter in turning or on parting on a lathe turn the tool upside down and reverse the spindle rotation so that your pulling against the dove tail instead of pushing against it.

  2. #42
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    Instead of the piece of spring steel to hold parallels apart in a mill vise, I have used a piece of foam pipe insulation. Why? Because it was there...

    OMcG

  3. #43
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    In case anyone missed this in the greatest hits section...

    http://www.practicalmachinist.com/ub...c;f=8;t=000044

    The thread is about heavy downfeeds with small crossfeed increments when surface grinding. As someone who has always been more than a little "surface grinding challenged" I can say this absolutely works as described. Tried it the other day on some stuff I had to grind, and I've never had ground plates come out looking so good. Certainly not my own idea, but its a good-un.

  4. #44
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    When drilling sheet metal, tear off some waste rag, enough to cover the hole size. Place the rag over the pilot hole and drill your hole, presto! one clean hole without any burrs or rough edges and the drill will not tend to grab.

    To set up a cutter on centre, lightly paste a Zig Zag cigarette paper to the work, bring the cutter over till it just picks the paper, then it is just a matter of 1/2 the tool dia plus 1/2 the work dimension. (trouble is you will have to take up smoking)

    cheers, Ken

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  6. #45
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    Ever reamed a hole for a dowel pin that was just a tad too loose? Take a ball bearing slightly larger than the reamed hole size and place it on the hole. Give it a sharp rap with your ball peen hammer and it will peen the hole just enough so that you get a nice press fit again.

    This also works really well if you tap a hole and the thread gage fits a little loose. Take a ball bearing slightly larger than the tapped hole and lay it on top of the hole. Give it a good rap with your hammer and you will never have a part get rejected for a bad thread again. We've been doing this for years and it works just great. Word to the wise - maybe you don't want your boss to see you do this. Sometimes the less said the better.

    Joe

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  8. #46
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    Joe, I'm shocked

    One "remedy" I've used when accidentally reaming oversized holes near the common fractional sizes, is to take an old tap and grind the cutting face of the flutes back to a negative rake angle, essentially, ruining the tap for anything except cold forming. Since the taps are maybe .005 over the nominal bolt OD, they will still displace a little bit of metal if the reamed hole is maybe a thousandth or two oversize.

    Wind the tap into the hole and it will displace a bit of a groove, and makes an excellent press fit for a dowel pin.

    Come to think of it, I'll actually have to try cold form threading a hole with an old cutting tap modified this way. Maybe we're all fools to be buying new cold forming taps?

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  10. #47
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    Tips I learned from my "Nut-Splitter" friends
    (Nut-Splitter is one of probably many nicknames for old timey machinists)

    1. Use MA Ford single flute countersink on any tapped hole to clean up mouth and ensure clean starts every time, plus it looks professional. I leave one in a benchtop $50 china-made drill press 24-7.

    2. To turn to length, use a mag-base dial indicator on lathe ways with plunger on carriage. zero indicator, make facing cut, turn to length needed.

    3. Grind a finishing tool as shown in Sperry's book "the amateurs lathe". basicly a very sharp corner(no radius) to the left with nearly flat front barely clearing the work, which shaves the high spots left from the feed rate.

    4. Power tap as often as possible with 2 or 3 flute taps in lathe or mill. In Mill, simply run spindle at medium to low speed, shut off motor, feed down, hit brake when deep enough, reverse and you are done. I have Never (so far) broken a tap, but rarely do smaller than 1/4". Watch depth stop on mill to prevent lifting part or worse.

    5. Buy Lots of q-c holders (under $20 form J&L every other month)I have 30. Keep all set up with sharp tools and make time like never before. For tools on two sides of tool holder, shim as needed to ensure center height.

    6. I like lots of tailstock drill chucks also (I think I have 7) One will always have center drill, another single flute countersink, others drills and taps as needed per job.

    7. Radius form tool in one of the Q-C toolholders which I use to finish the end of any handle I make to make them look professional.

    8. To align a thin part in lahte chuck without back-spacers, II use Rudy Kouhoupt's tip of "rubbing" the face of lightly chucked part with a cartridge bearing tool I made and have in a toolholder....gets as close as can be to square.

    9. Whel using telescoping inside gages, hold at angle in bore, release to expand, lock at angle, then rotate through the bore compressing and self centering the gage, this gives consistant readings.

    10. Never slide your tailstock without first wiping the ways clean and oiling with way oil.

    11. NEVER grab a stringy chip with hands, cloved or not, especially near a rotating machine spindle.

    Hope someone finds at least one of these useful, Brett Flemming Vancouver,WA

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  12. #48
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    If you ever used the "loc-line" coolant nozzles, they can be a pain in the but to add more pieces to it

    put a cup of water in the microwave, and boil the water..now add your "loc-line" pieces in the water for about a minute..take them out and now its much easier to add length or put different nozzles on...

    brent

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  14. #49
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    I have no machining tricks, as I'm still learning....but continuing on the bearing theme, the Army used to buy us 5 gallon buckets of wheel bearing grease (peanut butter style) PITA to pack in the tapereds, and messy.

    For the large semi wheel bearings we needed to service, hold the bearing horizontal about chest level (use bothe hands), stand over the bucket 'o grease, aim real good and drop it nice so it stays level on the way down...look in bucket, grease has come out the upper face in strands through rollers, yer done...it's packed.

  15. #50
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    Ahh! Bearings
    Reminded me of another hint.
    If you need to get an outer race from a bearing out of a blind or semi-blind hole. Hopefully the inner race and balls are gone. Run a bead of weld around the inside of the outer race let it cool and presto it will usually fall right out when turned over. Be careful not to weld the race to the housing.

    Happy welding............Michael

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  17. #51
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    removing allen head bolts ,,,if you strip the head,take a punch with a slite domed head and smack it straight down ,then tap the wrench back into allen head .most of time it will come out . if not try again and have a friend put light pressure on the wrench as if he was removing it and hit the head with a punch in the same direction it will break it loose .jim

  18. #52
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    Centering a piece in a three jaw lathe chuck:
    1)If the workpiece has a center in the end just snug up in the three jaw and bring the live center in the tailstock into the workpiece while running so it pushes the workpiece into the chuck about 1/8 or so.
    2)Use the flat end of something softer than the workpiece (tool holder, aluminum, etc.) clamped in the crosslide and bring to touch the workpiece while it's rotating at about 250 rpm. Again while the workpiece is just snugged.

    With both of these methods stop the lathe afterwards and tighten the chuck. Indicating is always best but these are quick and dirty methods.

    A drill chuck that keeps coming off the arbor. Take some lapping compound (medium grit) and lightly coat the arbor or the drill chuck tapered hole. Chuck up the drill chuck in a lathe and the arbor in the tail stock. Run the lathe at about 450 rpm and lock the tail stock within range of the chuck. Slowly bring the arbor into the drill chuck with your hand on the E-stop. The lapping compound will lap in a new surface to both. When the lapping compound runs out there will be a moment when you hear the metal to metal squeal. Stop immediately before any damage is done.

    A round hole in a stamping die that keeps pulling slugs and is too small to use an ejector pin. Take a ball bearing that's about 5x bigger than the hole and put some medium lapping compound on it. Grip the ball in a drill chuck and lap the hole with the ball untill there's a micro c'sink around the cutting edge of the hole, use an eye loupe to veiw as it doesn't take much.

    Punch to die alignment can be roughly set with shims but sometimes it's easier to use pantyhose over complex shaped punches.

    There are many others but are specific to stamping dies, furthermore it's 5am and my brain isn't up to speed yet to remember any more.

  19. #53
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    When you have a part that has "nearly" but not quite parallel surfaces to put in a milling machine vise corrogated cardboard can be used to make up the difference, at least long enough to make a few cuts. This won't last long-term, but if you need to hold the sides of a part to mill the top and bottom parallel, this works well enough. Credit this to Tony Alvarez at NMSU machine shop, ME department. Thanks Tony!

  20. #54
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    for cutting a radious on the end of a part in the lathe, like say a handle for something, i often use a 4 flute corner rounding end mill held in a boring bar holder, it works great. i have also done this with ball end mills when a 1/4 round shape was needed. my favorite way to cut disks outa aluminum in the lathe is to chuck the blank in a 4 jaw or faceplate, then take and mount a die grinder with a small endmill to the toolpost, with the lathe on the slowest speed i feed the die grinder into it and it works great, i suppose you could also cut deep grooves this way, kinda like using the lathe for a rotary table. oh and ya know what makes a great power feed for a small rotary table, a rotisserie motor, just take an old socket extension and mill a square to fit into the 5/16 hex drive of the rottiserie motor and then put a socket that fits the nut on the handle of your rotary table, yea ya still gota hold it there, and its single speed, but its slow enough that it is great for most stuff, and i would rather hold it there than try and crank the handle slowly and evenly, and the best part there usualy free or cheap at junk shops.

  21. #55
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    oh and never throw away a solid carbide endmill, grind it into a nevative rake spade drill for those times ya gota drill out something harder than hell, they are perfect cause there short and super rigid then

  22. #56
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    For quick and dirty locating an odd part in the four jaw for a boring operation. Locate and center drill your starting mark. Place the part against the face of the chuck with the jaws wide open. Bring up the tail stock with a center, and hold the part against the face of the chuck with the tails stock while you tighten the jaws around the part. Should be good to within a few thou.

  23. #57
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    Get a set of flat feeler guages and take it apart for use as shim stock.

  24. #58
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    I wanted to mark 0,90,180,270 on some round stock in the lathe for indexing. Stop the lathe and pop open the drive cover. In autocad I drew a circle with 1 degree increments and printed it out. Double back taped it to the main drive hub. Make a pointer that points to the label. Now when I finsh turning I can use the cutting tool to scribe a line in the part at any angle.

  25. #59
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    I guess I'm really getting old. Doesn't anybody still use Crisco or kerosene any more for tappin'?

    Cheap and still works.

    Dana

  26. #60
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    millberg

    That is clever. [img]smile.gif[/img]


    My tip.
    Make sure the "Shop" does the occasional job for the little woman.


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