Vise squad -- pics -- let's see yours - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    The one in the garage is mounted that way.

  2. #22
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    All of mine are mounted with the jaws overhanging the bench. The big one was a little tough to manage, but there's still about 1/4" of clearance between a workpiece and the bench face.

  3. #23
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    Here's my Yost 31C:


    I keep thinking about mounting it, but don't want to give up my 4" Craftsman that my wife "gave" me for our first anniversary in 1968. [img]smile.gif[/img]

    Roger

  4. #24
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    well , here is big,




    and little.


    and then there is this , you can hold it and beat it.

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  6. #25
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    Well mine isnt large but I have received alot of positive coments for the wayI have it mounted on the point of the bench.It works great this way.You can put a long piece in it and it wont hit anything.



  7. #26
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    i have lots of vises-auctions,women,booze....wait the other kind of vise -yea heres' my biggest one http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b7...f/IM000678.jpg biggest one i ever saw. bought it and restored it as you see here.

  8. #27
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    These are a couple of vices of the old 'Reed' make, from back in the 1930's, which I did up about ten years ago, for use in our gun-tinkering area here.

    One is a little 3-1/2" Reed with the swivelling back-jaw, a convenient size for small work, the other is an old 4-1/2" 'combination' vice which originally had pipe jaws under the main jaws.

    An advantage of the old Reed vices is the integral hardened steel jaw faces, which were forge-welded to the main castings, instead of being retained with screws or pins. For reasons known only to the old blacksmiths of many years ago, they did a nasty deep chequering or serration of the jaw faces, which does ugly vice marks on one's work.

    I made up some improvised fixturing to get the vice castings into the surface grinder, to bring the jaw faces dead smooth and parallel, sufficiently so to hold a scrap of .001 feeler stock at either end of the jaws.

    (this is easier than one would think, actually.....you just set up the vice casting, in the fixture, on a surface-plate, sweep the jaw-face with an indicator, and adjust til you have a zero on all four corners of the face. After grinding both jaws, reassemble the vice, tighten the jaws, and try with feeler-gages, mark out the error, and reset one jaw in the fixture with the lows raised by the amount of the error, then re-grind. )

    Having the vice jaws dead smooth and dead parallel makes it easy to handle high finish work, like small gun parts, without marking them....a single layer of ordinary masking-tape over the jaw faces often works quite well, actually. There's nothing for it but to use soft copper or babbitt jaw covers for some work, tho, or little slips of hardwood, like cocobolo wood, stuck to the jaws temporarily with an epoxy.

    http://www.tactical-link.com/ebay/vice1.jpg

    http://www.tactical-link.com/ebay/vice2.jpg

    This one is one of the famous old Columbian allegedly unbreakable 'malleable iron' vices, from the late '30's, possibly the '40's sometime. Its a 4-1/2", with the swivelling back jaw. Eventually, whenever I can get around to it, this one will have the jaw faces ground smooth/parallel, and will replace a smaller vice on one of the benches here.

    cheers

    Carla

    http://www.tactical-link.com/ebay/vice3.jpg

    [ 07-28-2006, 04:15 AM: Message edited by: carla ]

  9. #28
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    You can buy an import grinding vise cheap, chuck it up in your bench vise (using some angle aluminum on the jaw faces, so as not to damage the precision vise) and maybe a platen underneath.
    Then use your bench vise as a bench vise.


    I bought a 4.5 Starrett machinist vise years ago, and broke it, fixed it, broke it-.

    I want one that needs a small crane to install.

  10. #29
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    Ooh, pretty.

    I also have a 4" Desmond-Stephan (anyone hear of these guys?) swivel vise, a 3" Craftsman/Columbian, and of course a couple of Vacu-Vises for really tiny stuff. But none of those are mounted right now.

  11. #30
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    I want to see DT's new lever operated vise....


    With bending jaws in place



    With extended jaws

    And yes, for the photos I cleaned the workbench off and sort of lined up all the jaws just for you guys !

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  13. #31
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    I love this thread. It is great to see other peoples unique vises. Personally I think that a good vise is the second most important shop tool after a good workbench.

    I just mounted on a newly fabricated stand what I believe is one of the best general-purpose shop vises ever made. It is a Wilton 6" with supplemental replaceable hardened pipe jaws. Unfortunately this configuration is no longer made. I picked this vise up at a military base closing auction. The U.S. government only buys the best. Please excuse the excessive number of pictures showing off my "new" baby.

    Vise on stand. Allows 360 degree access.

    Vise closeup

    Vise opened wide

    To add some metalworking content this is a picture of the original swivel clamp and one I made to replace a broken one.


    Some of the features of this vise are:
    </font>
    • Jaw pad dimensions: 6" x 1.5" x 1"</font>
    • Throat dimension from top of jaw to top of slide 7.25"</font>
    • Maximum jaw opening: 10"</font>
    • Weight: Too heavy for me to lift alone [img]smile.gif[/img]</font>
    • 360 degree swivel base</font>
    • Dual 5/8" diameter swivel lockdown screws</font>
    • Replaceable hardened jaws</font>
    • Replaceable hardened auxilliary pipe jaws</font>
    • Jaws attach with screws from the back allowing for ease of replacement and no damage to the screws during use</font>
    • Concealed clamping screw</font>


    This is a picture of the workhorse that the Wilton replaced. It was a great old vise but if I applied enough torque with a long breaker bar I could spring the jaws.


    Just to show how vise crazy I am here is a list of some of my vises (vices?):

    </font>
    • 5" Craftsman bench vise with swivel base (my first!)</font>
    • 4" antique Blacksmith's leg vise on stand (shown above)</font>
    • Emmert patternmaker's vise (rare)</font>
    • Tiawanese multi-jaw rotary vise</font>
    • 4.5" Model S74 Rock Island bench Vise with swivel base (anyone know about this company?)</font>
    • 6" Kurt Model D675 AngLock milling machine vise with swivel base (I sold the Tiawanese copy) [img]redface.gif[/img]</font>
    • 6" Kurt Model 3600V Versatile Lock milling machine vise</font>
    • 3.375" Craftsman tilting swivel machinist vise</font>
    • 10" Wilton woodworking vise</font>
    • 10" Reed woodworking vise</font>
    • 7" Reed woodworking vise - Qty. 2</font>
    • 6" Heinrich cam-action quick-release drill press vise</font>
    • Heinrich cam-action quick-release band saw vise</font>
    • zyliss Vise Kit (Yes, I bought it at a fair)</font>
    • PanaVise with standard and low-profile head</font>
    • Black & Decker Workmates - Qty. 2</font>
    • Black & Decker Workmate Shop Box</font>
    • 2.375" Wilton Model AC-325 welder right angle clamping vise</font>
    • Starrett Model 86 hand vise</font>
    • No-name antique hand vise</font>
    • 1-1/2" capacity pipe vise</font>

    This has been a fun exercise cataloging all of the vises that I have collected over the years. I think that if we listed all the other workholding equipment such as chucks, holddowns, clamps etc. that we all have, we would be astounded by the length of the list. You have to hold it to work on it!

  14. #32
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    So who besides me and my Dad has an Emmert Vise? Anybody have the smaller version? How about a Yost Vise?

    Between the 2 of us, we have 3. He has 2 (one of which I broke when I was 16 ) and I have 1.

    Andy

  15. #33
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    So who besides me and my Dad has an Emmert Vise?
    Judging from the number I've seen over the years, and one's on eBay...a thousand or so Emmert's around the USA still in use...of course it's for woodworking, not metal.

    I should get one myself..wonder what they are selling for these days ? And are the copies any good ?

  16. #34
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    You can never have too many vices (English spelling) I have :-
    2x Record # 25 heavy bench vices.
    1x Record # 23 heavy bench vice.
    1x Record # 3 light bench vice.
    2x Record # 00 miniature bench vices
    1x Record # 414 drill press vice.
    1x Abwood swivel base machine vice.
    1x Comet swivel base machine vice.
    2x Myford machine vices.

    One of the Record # 00 vices is kept in my car tool box (you never know).
    Record vices can't be beaten for quality and strength and Abwood machine vices are about the best that money can buy.
    Malc.

  17. #35
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    Here's my old Wilton on a large piece of cast plate, ( I think ). That's the trouble with scrap from the dump, err... sorry, I mean tranfer station. Never know what kind of metal it is. So it's poorly welded and bolted together. Not as pretty as twolluver's. I like the way Wilton covers the screw. You can really put the grease to it and not worry about swarfage.

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  19. #36
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    Another form of "Old Arn Disease" !
    Remember, folks, if you have three or more of them, it's a collection!
    Take a tip from the antique tractor fans: never line them up all in one place, it makes it too easy for your wife to count them.

    Let's see:
    * Bridgeport Milling Vise on my Van Norman, too heavy to lift.
    * Clausing milling vice for which I had to do "The Flea Market Death March", carrying this greasy mess for about a half mile at arm's length, because I was wearing nice clothes.
    * 6" Wilton
    * The prize: a big Charles Parker received as a Christmas Gift from a girlfriend. (Is she a keeper or what?)
    * Quick-Adjust woodworking vise
    * Two old-fashioned wooden vises with steel acme screws, on my woodworking bench.
    * A genuine Versa-Vise, one of the trickiest vises ever invented.
    * A Zyliss Holding System, purchased in two lots, ten years and 2,000 miles apart.
    * Palmgren tilting machinist's vise
    * Stanley 4" drill press vise
    * North Brothers "Yankee" drill press vise, with tilt/swivel base, purchased separately literally years apart.
    * A really tiny North Brothers "Yankee" drill press vise that is only abut 1-1/2 wide.
    * Several "Hand Vises"
    * Two Panavises, one for circuit boards, one conventional
    * A combination vise-anvil, not too different from the one pictured above.
    * He He He A wooden "endvise" with a WOODEN SCREW about 2-1/2" in diameter, purchased at the CRAFTS-NJ auction. How's that for oddball?

    'Bout the only ones I don't have, and still want (I wouldn't dare say "need") are the Emmert and maybe a "gunstock vise".

    Does anyone here have the Tucker Vise from Veritas / Lee Valley Tools? I've often wondered if they are just hype or really worth the substantial price.

    How about moving to Florida and starting a firm called "Miami Vise"???

    John Ruth

  20. #37
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    Here's Carl Matthews's web-site about the Emmert, Oliver, and other patternmakers' vic....er....vises

    http://www.mprime.com/emmert/oliver.htm

    This 'link' goes to the Oliver page on that site....the green-painted one in the photo at the top of the page, and in a couple of the photos below, showing its different positions on a somewhat cluttered bench, is the one I rebuilt for myself some years ago, when I was getting into learning to do a bit of woodworking.

    cheers

    Carla

  21. #38
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    My wifes mother gave me this one:

  22. #39
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    Hey Don, I would guess that there are more than 1000 emmert vises out there. I have owned three- but own none at the moment. Got my first at an ingersol pump company auction- their old time pattern shop, they had 40 emmerts- that is not an overstatement.

    On eBay, they seem to sell in the $500 range for the turtlebacks, and $600-$800 for the newer style vise. I have not seen the smaller one lately but I think the sell in the $300 range.

    The repro vises are all based on the smaller one- not the big workhorses that go for the big bucks- check out the weight differences.

    Carla, thanks for the link, whomever put that site together is sick- lots of obsessive work.

    Pete

  23. #40
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    My vise isn't as cool as the others, but it was my great-grandfather's. As a kid I remember it languishing unused in the barn where it stayed until I was old enough to get married & buy a house, at which point my dad gave it to me. Its a nice size, tight and and in good shape, the only thing that would improve it would be a swivel base & removeable jaws, OTOH it works just fine as it is.

    Regards,

    Greg




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