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  1. #21
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    I don't know about other localities, but here in Kalifoania, you can require an employee to supply his own hand tools provided you are paying him at least twice the minimum wage.


    At the last shop I worked in, the boss did not require the techs to supply their own tools, because he didn't pay twice minimum. He had a box full of tools for shop use.

    We all had our own tools there anyway, because his stuff was junk.

  2. #22
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    The last job I was at for 26 years. On the third to the last day the plant supervisor told me he would need to go through my tool box with a tool list. I brought my tool box by his office and he informed me he needed a screw driver and an allen wrench back. i selected one of each and handed them to him. I then asked what I should do with the box. He asked "You have a truck don't you?" My half ton did the job well but was overloaded.

  3. #23
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    traytop...

    I think that is about the standard.

    I was doing a lot of machine/fab work in a friend's shop for one of my previous jobs.

    I made the deal with them that I would do it at my normal rate, if they supplied all tooling and materials.

    When I left, I asked them if they wanted all the measurement instrumentation back and they replied with a smile and "what instrumentation"?

    Not to mention the Kurt vise and indexable carbide tooling. I think I made more by quitting than I did with 3 months of wages, but I saved them a hell of a lot of money by being able to just go over to that friend's house and make something up at 2 in the morning when we would otherwise be shutting down one of the big 3.

    Those were really the beginning of my tool collection...an awful disease that just wont go away.

    -Jacob

  4. #24
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    Justin

    When I went to school, before I made even a single dime, I had to dish out used irons list plus.
    By the way, thank you everyone thats contributed. I think I have a good basis on what to expect from my guys. [img]smile.gif[/img]

    Rob D

  5. #25
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    nobody said files I dont think...

    should he have some?

    -Jacob

  6. #26
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    There is some good/bad news though. Today's used market is so vast that there is little excuse for not being able to buy good tools. Ebay has really helped for some people, yet I don't think I've ever paid more then $10 for a Micrometer, and I own all Starretts, 1-10." Infact I was actually given 4-10" ones. All of them check fine with a gageblock and calibrated nicely at work. That is the benefit of having a good used toolstore near by. Then there is my favorite of all measuring tools my Interrapid .0005" Test Indicator. That little thing is cute as a button and a real joy to use. $55 in like new condition at the used tool store. I generally speaking tend to think if I borrow a tool more then twice I should buy it. That said at my company all the bigger measuring tools from a 3"micrometer to 36" micrometer, from 12" vernier-8ft vernier, and all sorts of other specialized measuring tools are all sitting in inspection. All we need to do is sign them out. I'd say that I do fine right now in my toolbox 90% of the time with my 1"+2" Mic's a 6" scale, a 6" dial caliper (Which I hope to phase out for a digital as chips keep getting stuck in the rack). Drill chuck key, adjustable wrench, test indicator, set of milling machine parallels, a protractor head level, magnetic base, machinist square, screw drivers, PAIR OF TWEESERS ( this one is a big one get a nice fine pair to take out all of those lousy splinters)and a handfull of files which the company provides. I however have almost a complete hobby machine shop at home however where I can bring in the one or two things I'm missing. I'm only working there though for the summer, as I'm studying engineering, but I would think that all of the above is prety much what some one should have to get in the door.

    I think that would be a real good start. After that they should either find a used toolstore, or watch ebay and catalogs for good sales and buy the tools to fit the jobs that they are doing.

    Adam

  7. #27
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    I actually needed to go through my tool box and delete (Take home) tools I had not used in six months. I had to push the thing to my work site. Mind you my box would sit for several weeks and I would make trips to it via a golf cart. If I moved the (Big) box there was something gonna happen. I usually would not get to excited unless I was going to pull a carrier or actually do alignment work beyond simple adjustment or leveling. You have to guard against cluttering what is your actual intention. I have seen many times people with tools they use every six years pushing them down the aisle.

  8. #28
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    Rob D, what is the name of your company? I'm local to Griffith; I live in Crown Point, about 10 miles away. I agree with whoever said you should have different stipulations for different jobs and experience levels. Your basic list looks real good, but I would add screwdrivers and a ratchet set to your list also, those are pretty basic and cheap. Maybe 12 and 24 inch rules, and if you're doing die work, definitely a prybar set. Tape measure? Heh, I better stop, or I'll end up writing a book!

  9. #29
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    I have mentioned this before, but here goes again.
    I hired on with a small machineshop, to do the maintance of the building. I was told that I would not be required to bring my toolbox from home. Any tools I needed would either be in the bosses toolbox, or borrowed from one of the other guys.
    First and second time I borrowed something, no problem. Third time, a small comment was made that maybe I ought to get some of my own tools.
    I stopped what I was doing, and went straight to the boss. We negotiated a deal, where I would purchase any needed tools from the Snap-on or MAC trucks that came by, and he would reimburse me to a limit of X dollars every week. The trucks would finance any purchases(no interest), and I would just pay them every week. Over the next several years, I amassed a second roll around loaded with tools.
    Anything over 1" in wrenches,etc was supplied by the shop, although most employees had them.
    I was the only one with a regular tool budget to my knowledge. During the best days of that shop, it was not uncommon for a complete set of something to be added to a machinists box, when something was broken or lost. Our boss had worked for years in shops where no new tools, endmills, drills, etc were purchased and used only if there was no other way around.
    He did not run his shop that way. If we needed it, we usually had it or it had been ordered when they bid the job.
    When he was considering selling the shop, he filled my meager toolbin with extra endmills and such. Considering I hadn't been employed by him in over 7 years, I thought it was awfully nice of him. A true friend indeed.
    Take care of your employees that take care of your tools, with new tools might be a way to handle it?
    David from jax

  10. #30
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    dont forget the good old tape measure!

    many jobs start at the saw with a tape measure.

  11. #31
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    Have you considered adding tape measures to your shop? Or other hand tools and hardware.

    Tape measures are crutial tools that everyone must have one in their home when doing DIY work.

    You may visit this site: ribrosco.com.tw for more info.

    Ray
    -----------
    ribrosco.com.tw

  12. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by ribrosco View Post
    Have you considered adding tape measures to your shop? Or other hand tools and hardware.

    Tape measures are crutial tools that everyone must have one in their home when doing DIY work.

    You may visit this site: ribrosco.com.tw for more info.

    Ray
    -----------
    ribrosco.com.tw
    That's funny! Trolling a 14 year old thread...

  13. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by ribrosco View Post
    Have you considered adding tape measures to your shop? Or other hand tools and hardware.

    Tape measures are crutial tools that everyone must have one in their home when doing DIY work.

    You may visit this site: ribrosco.com.tw for more info.

    Ray
    -----------
    ribrosco.com.tw
    We use the calibrated starrett tape measures at work, pretty much no need for micrometers and calipers anymore. And they are easy to carry what with the handy belt clip.

  14. #34
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    When you quote a spammer, please go in and edit the quoted part to remove the linky.

    That way, when the moderator deletes that post (#31 in this case), you post can stay.


    Or else, your quoted has the live linky still in it, and the spammer wins.

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  16. #35
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    Got everything I needed when younger didnt mind spending the cash as mainly worked on piecework systems the more you did the more bonus you made so it was not uncommon to spend 10mins looking for a micrometer,or a Dti,so it was a no brainer buy your own they paid for themselfs.Company had a Tool Club and they gave discounts weekly or monthly deductions from your pay


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