160 tonnes of force and the shaft won’t come out!? Ideas? - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    If the original guys who made that setup were worth a damn, the fit will be undercut so it only hits in some smaller spots. One fit on either end and one fit in the middle of the shaft. If they really knew what they were doing, the fits will be slightly different in diameter so that the first two slip through and then all three will engage at once.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami View Post
    Guys, lets just hold hard and maybe back up a bit here.

    Taken from the OP ''Sleeve is approx 5 feet long with a 10” ID and 13” OD. Which makes the sleeve approx 1.5” wall thickness. ''

    According to my maths (which is far from good - so check if you like ) That shaft to sleeve fit amounts to an area 13.09 sq feet - yes square feet …..which equals one hell of a lot of friction.

    On edit - some more figures to consider.

    That 10" dia x 5ft long piece of bar in the sleeve alone weighs <> 1336 lbs (606 kg)
    Lotsa square feet work to your advantage if you pump high pressure oil between the sleeve and shaft.
    10k psi oil between the sleeve and shaft and the shaft is free-floating most of the way until too much oil starts to escape.
    Apparently they use 2800 bar(40k PSI!) pressure for dismounting train wheels but compared to train wheel the OP's sleeve is rubber hose.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattiJ View Post
    Lotsa square feet work to your advantage if you pump high pressure oil between the sleeve and shaft.
    10k psi oil between the sleeve and shaft and the shaft is free-floating most of the way until too much oil starts to escape.
    Apparently they use 2800 bar(40k PSI!) pressure for dismounting train wheels but compared to train wheel the OP's sleeve is rubber hose.
    for this application wouldn't grease be better?

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    I feel for ya, I have removed shafts from drums (MUCH smaller ~6 OD) and it can be a royal PITA. In my very limited experience the SKF method sounds like a great idea, along with the center burnout. As was fingered out above the surface area of contact is large and as followed the friction is then up their too. I do like the induction method. I would run some numbers right off the hop. Try and get an idea of the coefficient of expansion for each. I don't know but the large portable generators that utilities use to provide emergency power might have the capacity to provide enough current to go the induction route.
    Could be that by combining that with a burnt out center and the oil injection method might work. I dunno but a lot of good ideas have been floated, I learned a lot just reading the thread. Forgive a possible faux pau here but Adam Booth (Booth Machining?)who does vids on you tube does a lot of big shaft work, couldn't hurt to reach out, he seems like quiet a bright guy maybe able to provide some suggestions.
    Good luck please keep us informed I would like to see it goes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by johansen View Post
    for this application wouldn't grease be better?
    Ehhh, not really sure. Intuitively, it seems to be a balance of penetration and conservation. With zero penetration (thick grease), you'd basically be installing a set screw at the port location. With infinite penetration (light oil), you would lose the fluid faster than you could build pressure, and no work would be done.

    That being said, I have absolutely no recommendation regarding what kind of oil will be effective.


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