7050 vs 7075 aluminum for plastic injection molds
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    Default 7050 vs 7075 aluminum for plastic injection molds

    I've seen many recommendations for the specialty QC7 and QC10 aluminums, as well as for 7075, but have not seen anyone mention 7050. Looking at the properties, it seems 7050 would be well suited. Has anyone used it for injection molds?

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    I think hardness is a little down from 7075, so if abrasion resistance is an issue you'd be better off with that. But I do like 7050 for places where stability at elevated temperature matters, so that's a plus for it.

    But I don't do mold work, more mechanical parts...

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    Hi jhov:
    The industry standard for aluminum molds is Alumec 89.
    I was told it is basically 7075 in chemistry but is more consistent in hardness.
    I have no idea about 7050, but when you're making an aluminum mold you're not making a high volume tool anyway, so it's not that important IMO.

    I've gotten 50,000 shots out of an Alumec 89 tool molding an easy flow grade of Lexan (can't remember which grade anymore) but it was pretty much done at that point.
    I don't think you're going to do much better no matter what grade of high strength aluminum you use.

    7075, 7050, Alumec 89...Pick the one you can get most easily in the form factor you need for the best price and don't stress too much about it.
    They'll all make molds just fine and there isn't enough difference between them to worry about it.

    If you want a longer lasting tool, go to P-20 or even P-20 Hi Hard.
    If you want even better, go to NAK 55 or NAK 80 but you'll have fun machining it...it's almost 40RC .
    I've seen tools last 300,000 shots in NAK 55, and still good for another 100,000 shots

    Cheers

    Marcus
    Implant Mechanix • Design & Innovation > HOME
    Vancouver Wire EDM -- Wire EDM Machining

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    Thanks for the replies. I'll give 7050 a try. I found a source of drops that are suitable for a good price. These will be my first attempt at mold making and they will be for prototyping various parts, and if possible, limited initial production once I get everything figured out.

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    Hi again jhov:
    Who's doing your mold design?
    Are you completely satisfied you can take your finished mold to a molder and not have it rejected?
    There are some simple things that are important, so your design has to incorporate those features and dimensions...if you neglect these things the molder won't be able to put your tool in his press.

    Post your design here if you want to; I'm sure there will be lots of useful input from experienced people.

    Cheers

    Marcus
    Implant Mechanix • Design & Innovation > HOME
    Vancouver Wire EDM -- Wire EDM Machining

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    Quote Originally Posted by implmex View Post
    Hi again jhov:
    Who's doing your mold design?
    Are you completely satisfied you can take your finished mold to a molder and not have it rejected?
    There are some simple things that are important, so your design has to incorporate those features and dimensions...if you neglect these things the molder won't be able to put your tool in his press.

    Post your design here if you want to; I'm sure there will be lots of useful input from experienced people.

    Cheers

    Marcus
    Implant Mechanix • Design & Innovation > HOME
    Vancouver Wire EDM -- Wire EDM Machining
    I'm doing the mold design. I'm not done with it yet, but given the current economic outlook I'm buying whatever materials I know I'm going to need.

    I'll also be the molder, once I acquire a suitable press.

    One of my previous threads for more info:
    Plastic injection molding resources

    I appreciate all the info from everyone on this forum. This place is awesome. Thanks.


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