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    You could always pour the cement around the lathe, it would make good
    reinforcement for the block....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Miguels244 View Post
    I always figured it was called a mafia block because it could hide a body.


    I figured it was because you could tie the person to it, pretty much same results as "Chicago boots".

    Sheesh... talk about sanitized political correctness, I just googled "Chicago boots", and all I found was shoe stores!

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    Quote Originally Posted by henrya View Post
    There is a thread here where the poster built a really nice concrete bench top for his South Bend lathe. He had lots of experience building concrete counters for kitchens and commercial use IIRC. The pictures of his process were outstanding and the results looked great. Its worth a few minutes of your time to search for that thread.
    Building a beefcake lathe bench

    Always wanted to make one for my friends little import lathe.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kenton View Post
    Building a beefcake lathe bench

    Always wanted to make one for my friends little import lathe.
    Ditch all the welding of legs & such....form up the legs from sonatubes....

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    Wow, lots of responses! I wish I could reply to each, but that would be a mess.

    Essentially, this is a 1hp lathe that has questionable pedigree according to the rules, although, I have seen an entire thread dedicated to it here.

    The steel: all rectangle is 1/4" wall, the pipe is something like 5/16", and the c-channel is approximately 3/8". It is 1/4" at the tipsof the "C"(I never measured, this was all eyeball-engineering and it the biggest that the surplus store had on shelf).

    I see that the channel will be the weak point if the 1hp is capable of such force, so am heavily considering boxing it in on the underside at minimum. I have considered concrete filling, but am concerned about the moisture. I Probably will bolt it to garage floor even if I plan on selling the house soon.

    My main question: the lathe bed is supported at both ends of the bed by two "feet" cast into it, with the bed spanning between the two without additional support). Would adding solid support between the bed of the lathe and the c-channel (halfway between the cast feet) be of any benefit?
    Last edited by Kipling79; 08-10-2018 at 03:09 PM.

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    Your bench may be stiff enough. Bolt the lathe to it, and do some cutoff and heavy turning/facing operations to see if it goes into harmonic oscillation. That is what you are trying to prevent. If you can stall the motor without causing it to 'ring' you don't need to go any further. If it rings a bit, then bolting it to the floor may fix that.

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    I need to edit my post above, the c-channel is actually 3/8". The only points to check this are the holes i torched for the mounting bolts. There was still some slag there giving the appearance of greater thicknes.

    Ignator, I appreciate the input. A way to test such s this is very valuable information.

    I am sure the machine and stand are adequate for my current non-critical projects (replicating expensive/rare parts for a couple gun builds) but i definitely want to maximize the potential of the lathe for if/when I make parts for others or expand into other more critical parts.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kipling79 View Post
    I need to edit my post above, the c-channel is actually 3/8". The only points to check this are the holes i torched for the mounting bolts. There was still some slag there giving the appearance of greater thicknes.

    Ignator, I appreciate the input. A way to test such s this is very valuable information.

    I am sure the machine and stand are adequate for my current non-critical projects (replicating expensive/rare parts for a couple gun builds) but i definitely want to maximize the potential of the lathe for if/when I make parts for others or expand into other more critical parts.
    You can bolt it to the rock of Gibraltar, and it still may not give you the results
    your looking for.

    Other factors come into play, like bearing area of the ways, headstock construction,
    tailstock design/mounting, etc.

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    Seems like a lot of work for a machine (unknown brand or type) of limited capacity. Odds are you are not going to be taking heavy cuts at high speeds. I would not try to extend the machine capabilities just because of a rigid base.

    Tom

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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    Concrete is an excellent method.

    I can get mafia blocks for $30, 4k lbs, 2' x 2' x 6'.

    Some lead anchors drilled into the top, and your all set.
    Keep the lead out of the environment, willyah?

    Just nudge the LSO into the same trench you'll be burying the Mafia blocks in FIRST!

    It ain't goin' NOWHERE once the 'crete has it pinned and you've backfilled and compacted for paving the Jimmy Hoffa Memorial highway atop 'em.

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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    You can bolt it to the rock of Gibraltar, and it still may not give you the results
    your looking for.

    Other factors come into play, like bearing area of the ways, headstock construction,
    tailstock design/mounting, etc.
    I agree and disagree... I needed to make a stand for the lathe, so I decided to make one with more mass and rigidity than typically offered for bench-types. There really wasnt much extra effort involved since i was making the stands myself.

    My original question was whether adding an additional connection between the stand and lathe bed would be of benefit in maximizing the capabilities of a lathe with less iron.

    But... most people focused on the stand, and I see why now: although i suspect the machine itself won't be able to torque the 46" of unsupported c-channel, I have discovered that the weight of the entire unit is enough to twist the channel.

    While attempting to level the ways, I discovered that my leveling screw feet of the stand could twist those ways quite easily. I now have them leveled with a starret 98, and am thinking i will reinforce the c-channel now that everything is close to true.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kipling79 View Post
    I have discovered that the weight of the entire unit is enough to twist the channel.

    While attempting to level the ways, I discovered that my leveling screw feet of the stand could twist those ways quite easily. I now have them leveled with a starret 98, and am thinking i will reinforce the c-channel now that everything is close to true.
    Uhh "now that..?"

    You DO realize that "reinforce the c-channel" means you will have to start all OVER again with the leveling, yah?

    What you are missing is really basic, too.

    Any structure you want to be "rigid", you have to one of:

    - stress a "skin", eggshell, 10EE base, Hardinge cabinet, or unibody vehicle style,

    ELSE

    - "triangulate", ALL dimensions, not just 2D, like the frames concealed inside Graf Zeppelin's dirigibles or in plain view, Gustav Eiffel's tower or the Firth of Forth railway bridge.

    ELSE

    - Be monolithic. Where"mono" is one and "lith" is rock, FWIW.

    Gibralter. Denali. Everest.

    All of these do MOVE, just are not all that easily deflected by puny humans and their toys.

    Some things just do not change.

    Get it "right"? Well.. the Forth bridge may go 200 years in service. Eiffel tower as well. Gibralter and such? Don't even ask..

    Added dead mass, OTOH is basically a "passenger".

    That's why mountains are not easily portable. Even route-step "Untied" airlines won't allow them as carry-on baggage.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kipling79 View Post

    While attempting to level the ways, I discovered that my leveling screw feet of the stand could twist those ways quite easily. I now have them leveled with a starret 98, and am thinking i will reinforce the c-channel now that everything is close to true.
    So the leveling screws that contact the floor are able to twist the lathe bed, even
    when firmly attached to the Channel of the new stand ?

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    That C-channel is VERY flexible in torsion.

    weld another to it, flange to flange, and weld a plate to each end..... NOW you have a strong and rather rigid structure.

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    Adding hot rolled steel to cast iron is like throwing a rabbit into the briar patch. There is nothing better for keeping things moving in there.

    But hej! If it makes you feel good. Anything is better than nothing...right.?

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    Quote Originally Posted by CalG View Post
    Adding hot rolled steel to cast iron is like throwing a rabbit into the briar patch. There is nothing better for keeping things moving in there.

    But hej! If it makes you feel good. Anything is better than nothing...right.?
    Concrete moves too, and keeps moving for several months.

    About the only way to deal with the situation is to use enough cast iron in the lathe to begin with. At least then it is all nearly the same composition, and won't move around TOO badly.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JST View Post
    Concrete moves too, and keeps moving for several months.

    About the only way to deal with the situation is to use enough cast iron in the lathe to begin with. At least then it is all nearly the same composition, and won't move around TOO badly.
    Are you in a hurry?

    They used to put lathe bed castings out in the yard for a year or two to "season". Now we can't wait for concrete to cure properly.

    Shmeesh! Can't win.

    Hey! I put the coins in the soda machine and the pop don't drop! What gives???

    Easy my friend, It takes time for the electrons to jiggle just right.

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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    So the leveling screws that contact the floor are able to twist the lathe bed, even
    when firmly attached to the Channel of the new stand ?
    Exactly. I was shocked, and am embarrassed that my armchair engineering failed. In researching stands for large bench lathes, I saw them mounted on everything from wooden tables, to rolling toolboxes; I thought I had over-engineered this one.

    I think the unit will be fine for now, especially if bolted to the floor, but hate to think of twisting my lathe if I ever move the whole assembly.

    I like JSTs idea of welding another channel making a box. There is room to do so, and maybe some gussets as well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kipling79 View Post
    Exactly. I was shocked, and am embarrassed that my armchair engineering failed. In researching stands for large bench lathes, I saw them mounted on everything from wooden tables, to rolling toolboxes; I thought I had over-engineered this one.

    I think the unit will be fine for now, especially if bolted to the floor, but hate to think of twisting my lathe if I ever move the whole assembly.

    I like JSTs idea of welding another channel making a box. There is room to do so, and maybe some gussets as well.
    So now what did we learn here ? You wanted a stand that was independent of the floor, but failed to provide all the stiffness in the stand without floor attachment.

    As I described, look at the Lincoln Electric book "Design of weldments"
    and read, and re-read the section on "Torsion".

    Hint: You will see a lathe bed in that chapter.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kipling79 View Post
    Exactly. I was shocked, and am embarrassed that my armchair engineering failed. In researching stands for large bench lathes, I saw them mounted on everything from wooden tables, to rolling toolboxes; I thought I had over-engineered this one.

    I think the unit will be fine for now, especially if bolted to the floor, but hate to think of twisting my lathe if I ever move the whole assembly.

    I like JSTs idea of welding another channel making a box. There is room to do so, and maybe some gussets as well.
    LOL! This reminds me of a magazine journalist interviewing a race car builder asking how he built such successful cars. IRRC the answer was simple enough:

    "You start with cubic money and add lightness."

    You add enough mass, you'll probably have spent rather a lot of money.

    At least you already have the "lightness', store-bought, to perch atop it like G'Mums fox-fur neck stole with the little beady glass fake eyes and Ivory teeth.

    And just about as flexible.

    And just about as hairy when it comes to trying to turn out good work!


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