Aloris tool holders, are they case hardened or through hardened? - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Default

    I have not seen it documented, but was told that it oxygenates the water. Since my water is well, it has little O so I was not going to try it without it.

    Time? At $60? Well, my son and I have Schaublin 102 and 70's. He machined the 102 holders and I machined my 70 holders. I guess about 5 hours designing and programming. About 3 hours setup, 45 min each holder. Cleaned, and handled with gloves, placed in container with charcoal, heat, dump in water 1 hour.

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  3. #22
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    how long did you leave it in the coal? these are times for professionally done carburizing (mild steel i suspect):

    Heat Treating Steel Time vs Temperature and Case Harden Thickness | Engineers Edge | www.engineersedge.com

    for "homegrown" it will be several times that. its quite a tricky business, where you need a certain proportions of co and co2 depending on the carbon content of the steel to be present. carbonates (barium, calcium, sodium) are added and they say activated charcoal is beneficial (aquarium), althoug i have certain doubs about this (without having tried it), because you want the reactions to procced at certain speeds according to the temperatures used and it might be too fast.

  4. #23
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    Default bubbler in the quench

    Color casing calls for bubbling air in the quench and uber clean metal
    The old time formula was bone charcoal, charred leather and a bit of Barium Carbonate

    Sorry don't recall the proportions but having done the process, when evertying is just "thus and so" you get really wild colors in relatively low carbon steel but a pretty shallow case.

    Houghten had a similar compound that was used in my parents shop... long long ago. It however was a KCN process. Most likely totally verboten today.

    What I recall most clearly is that if the sample didn't go "PING" in the quench you were either below critical temp or the rate of cooling was too slow


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