alternatives to tapping inconel 718?
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    Default alternatives to tapping inconel 718?

    I have been breaking a awful lot of 1/4-20 taps trying to hand tap Inconel 718. I was wondering if there are any threaded inserts that can be shrink fit or something along those lines to bypass tapping? I dont want to use helicoil inserts as I still need to tap the hole. Any insights or ideas will be appreciated.

    The taps are breaking because these are 3D printed specimens that are heat treated to give them thor strength

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    Quote Originally Posted by shyam View Post
    I have been breaking a awful lot of 1/4-20 taps trying to hand tap Inconel 718. I was wondering if there are any threaded inserts that can be shrink fit or something along those lines to bypass tapping? I dont want to use helicoil inserts as I still need to tap the hole. Any insights or ideas will be appreciated.

    The taps are breaking because these are 3D printed specimens that are heat treated to give them thor strength
    So weld or rivet them. No more bustid taps!



    Yes. TONS of inserts exist in immense variety for all manner of host material.

    Start with Penn Engineering even if only for ideas:

    PEM(R) Fasteners – PennEngineering

    They have competition. Lots of it. You can easily make your own to suit your particular needs, too. PEM was born off the back of just such a need.

    Otherwise? The "host" material is plenty strong enough to HOLD. Folks DO tap it. Often. Seems more than just an avoidable "nuisance" to have to thread-mill?

    How hard can it be to arrange to drill and tap BEFORE the heat-treat that is busting yer chops? Er.. 'taps'.

    ??

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    Unless there is a way to 3D print the threads, even partially, and finish off with the tap, I would seriously look into thread milling with carbide. I've done about 18 tons of Incoloy fabrication over the last decade.

    Question: how about having inserts made out of something like 4140 and then TIG them into the hole?

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    Emuge DF NI taps are specifically ground cobalt plus tramps for the dreaded inco nightmare, plus if enough room a jet of coolant down the hole if blind or back coolant up the hole if through, sticky pad and top hat hose end round the back, blow it up, old fashioned forward backward tapping plus withdrawing and flushing, slow but it works
    Mark

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    Wow what a pain. Lots of experienced people here who are familiar with this material extensively. Usually it is a confidence and competence thing because material is so very expensive and hard to work. After mastering it it is very good because in General most shops are repulsed by the prospect of jobs with such materials.

    The learning curve can be very expensive too much for most shops they just quit before they get bogged down.

    Emuge Taps overall have been a bright spot as far as tapping holes is concerned. They are a top notch mainstay for me. Too the thread milling has been fantastic on so many occasions that it hurts to think of the time before I started using the process.

    Keep in touch as with the suggestions given I am interested in what you end up doing.

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    If it is 3d printed it really should have the threads at least roughed in as made. Are you reaming the holes before tapping? Can you use a nut and bolt instead.

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    So I cannot weld or rivet them because it has to be removeable. it is a test specimen so it has to be assembled and disassembled. The test is conducted on inconel specimens as it is rotated and a load is applied to it. There are minimal forces on the screw so I think if I am able to find a threaded insert I will go with it.

    Furthermore, I am a noob machininst so I think it is also a contributing to the broken taps.


    The bar stock is brought heat treated because it is expensive (we found) to send it out to heat treat afterwards from a 3d printing vendor - the vendor prints the specimen, heat treats it and sends it over to us. We are a research lab and we have a few CNC machines in house but we do not have an oven for heat treat/qunching.

    THank you so much for your insights.

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    Threadmill or EDM

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    Perhaps a oversized hole and a longer bolt will work with tapping

    Peter

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    Get the proper grade Taps, in Taper , Plug and Bottom.
    Make damn sure your started straight.
    As soon as it becomes hard to push the Tap switch to the next, repeat.
    Lots of lube.
    Lots of patience.
    It can be done.

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    Quote Originally Posted by shyam View Post
    So I cannot weld or rivet them because it has to be removeable. it is a test specimen so it has to be assembled and disassembled. The test is conducted on inconel specimens as it is rotated and a load is applied to it. There are minimal forces on the screw so I think if I am able to find a threaded insert I will go with it.

    Furthermore, I am a noob machininst so I think it is also a contributing to the broken taps.


    The bar stock is brought heat treated because it is expensive (we found) to send it out to heat treat afterwards from a 3d printing vendor - the vendor prints the specimen, heat treats it and sends it over to us. We are a research lab and we have a few CNC machines in house but we do not have an oven for heat treat/qunching.

    THank you so much for your insights.
    If you are stuck with hard tapping in the current configuration, and the alternatives are not feasible for various reasons, then I would buy taps that have *lots* of positive rake AKA "hook teeth" and helical flutes. Maybe the tooling that is meant for aluminum/titanium would work. In any case I would have a long talk with suppliers like Emuge, OSG, and Guhring.

    Most of the work I did with Incoloy was for industrial furnaces, and the old timer machinist next door used to use HSS on it. BUT he was turning it OD and ID, not tapping.

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    so the parts have Thor strength. That's pretty tough.
    Emugees taps are the best choice. A little pricey. Although not as good, the OSG VC-10 works well and quite a bit cheaper.
    Use ;ots of moly-dee or eauiv. If I were hand tapping them, I would fabricate a tap guide to make sure they're going in straight.
    Any reason you're not threadmilling them?

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    What thread percentage are You using?

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    Quote Originally Posted by shyam View Post
    we have a few CNC machines in house but we do not have an oven for heat treat/qunching.
    " few CNC machines" is a tad vague, Threadmilling has many "votes". If you do not already know their capability, share with PM WHICH CNC machines.

    There will be be one or many (I am not among them) who will "know" the machines and if suited to drill and threadmill, same clamping, etc..

    After that, less waste motion, more specific guidance, and best of all expectation of good "repeatability".

    Page Two:

    Research lab and for testing?

    If you can afford the investment of "a few CNC machines", you really, really SHOULD look into adding an appropriately sized HT furnace with decent controls and QUALITY instrumentation. Even if too small for half the work, that is still half brought under your schedule control rather than dice-roll.



    Even the most helpful of third-party HT contractors will have other demands on their workflow scheduling that you cannot easily predict as but one client of many.

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    You have CNC machines, why are you hand tapping? What are you using for a tapping fixture? What is your hole size before tapping? Use a larger tap drill, the material is plenty strong enough with a 50% thread to break any bolt.

    Even if your CNC machines won't do helical interpolation, you can hand code the holes as a series of 3 axis straight moves. I'd start with 30 degree segments if your cam software won't do it for you.

    Another bodge that can be a lifesaver is to cut a neck in the tap with a cut off wheel on the surface grinder. Put the neck at the top of the flutes. Start with a neck diameter about 80% of the tap drill size and adjust as necessary. You can purposely break some of your dull taps in scrap material to calibrate the neck diameter to be slightly weaker than the threaded portion. This allows the tap to break leaving a sufficient projection above the surface to make removal easier and doesn't damage the threads.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gbent View Post
    Another bodge that can be a lifesaver is to cut a neck in the tap with a cut off wheel on the surface grinder. Put the neck at the top of the flutes. Start with a neck diameter about 80% of the tap drill size and adjust as necessary. You can purposely break some of your dull taps in scrap material to calibrate the neck diameter to be slightly weaker than the threaded portion. This allows the tap to break leaving a sufficient projection above the surface to make removal easier and doesn't damage the threads.
    LOL! .. and WISE makers of taps have been building that IN for over a hundred years!

    Bubba-the-greedy-genius figures them stupid and buys the full thickness versions... of course.

    HIS taps won't break any more than his s**t might actually stink to DIN or ANSI standard, after all.

    Go figure...

    And go thread-mill...

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    Have you ever checked out Rockmount research and alloys.

    They sell a threaded insert that is a little different from a helicoil

    Here is a customer using the product

    The only way to Fix Stripped Threads. - YouTube


    Maintenance Welding | Rods, Wires and Abrasives | Rockmount

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    Quote Originally Posted by gabrams55 View Post
    Have you ever checked out Rockmount research and alloys.

    They sell a threaded insert that is a little different from a helicoil

    Here is a customer using the product

    The only way to Fix Stripped Threads. - YouTube


    Maintenance Welding | Rods, Wires and Abrasives | Rockmount
    Did you take the time to READ all the questions & answers from the OP ?

    No, you just came here to SPAM

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    We used to joke about sending the parts as is with a tap and a note that said “some assembly required”


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