American Sun Vises
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  1. #1
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    I just picked up 3" and 4" machinist vices off of ebay and they had this name on them. Also said Ashton.PA.Made in USA. Really nicely made. Just wondered what the story was since I had never seen the name before. Maybe a gumminit job?

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    I have the 4" and it is quite nice. I live in the Aston area, but have never heard of American Sun. Aparently the guy on ebay is selling off the remaining inventory on commission. The manufacturer has moved into a different product line/market.

    The vise in question is an American copy of the Swiss Fribosa. The 4" from American Sun retailed for about $800. They can be had on ebay for around $100.

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    I paid $80, $90 respectively. When I got them, I thought, "Holy S$$$ What a deal! So, good deals can be had on ebay.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ztarum View Post
    I have the 4" and it is quite nice. I live in the Aston area, but have never heard of American Sun. Aparently the guy on ebay is selling off the remaining inventory on commission. The manufacturer has moved into a different product line/market.

    The vise in question is an American copy of the Swiss Fribosa. The 4" from American Sun retailed for about $800. They can be had on ebay for around $100.
    I know this is an old thread, but can you tell me what bolt size is in the side of the jaw of the American Sun vise (I have the smaller ones from ebay)? I suppose it is UNC 1/4" 20TPI, but as I am in Europe, I have no bolts to try, and it is virtually impossible to get them in the local shop. Thanks

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    Quote Originally Posted by Charles_nl View Post
    I know this is an old thread, but can you tell me what bolt size is in the side of the jaw of the American Sun vise (I have the smaller ones from ebay)? I suppose it is UNC 1/4" 20TPI, but as I am in Europe, I have no bolts to try, and it is virtually impossible to get them in the local shop. Thanks
    And it's an even older thread now... I just noticed your question while searching for something related. I have a 4" American Sun vise and the threaded hole on the side of my fixed jaw is 5/16" - 18.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stradbash View Post
    And it's an even older thread now... I just noticed your question while searching for something related. I have a 4" American Sun vise and the threaded hole on the side of my fixed jaw is 5/16" - 18.
    Thanks, but actually I can't remember why I would have asked that question, as the vise was and still is in perfect condition. Curiosity I suppose.

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  8. #7
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    For future reference, here is how to determine the pitch of an unknown internal thread. Take a wood pin that is a little larger than the minor diameter and shave off three flats, leaving it triangular. Screw it into the hole and then unscrew it. Now use a pitch gage on the wood. If no pitch gage, then use a steel scale and count threads over a distance. I use a microscope for small pitches. Estimate the major diameter of the hole and use a table of standard thread sizes to see what standard diameters match the pitch. If you are experienced, the trick will also work on special threads.

    Larry

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    Quote Originally Posted by L Vanice View Post
    For future reference, here is how to determine the pitch of an unknown internal thread. Take a wood pin that is a little larger than the minor diameter and shave off three flats, leaving it triangular. Screw it into the hole and then unscrew it. Now use a pitch gage on the wood. If no pitch gage, then use a steel scale and count threads over a distance. I use a microscope for small pitches. Estimate the major diameter of the hole and use a table of standard thread sizes to see what standard diameters match the pitch. If you are experienced, the trick will also work on special threads.

    Larry
    Thanks Larry, very nice I will remember that. Charles

    p.s. actually I would like to print this single message and store it on my PC, but I can't find an option to do that. Does it exist?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Charles_nl View Post
    Thanks Larry, very nice I will remember that. Charles

    p.s. actually I would like to print this single message and store it on my PC, but I can't find an option to do that. Does it exist?
    Copy it and paste into a word processor or email program, then file it where you can find it. You can even use a camera to shoot a picture of the screen and file it with your collection of machinery pictures. If in doubt, ask a kid how to do it.

    Larry

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    By replying to this thread you've subscribed. In the future when you need to find it just go to "subscribed threads" and there she'll be.

    You could also do what Larry said and copy and paste to word, or if on phone make a quick memo.

    You could also take a screen shot.

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    Quote Originally Posted by L Vanice View Post
    Copy it and paste into a word processor or email program, then file it where you can find it. You can even use a camera to shoot a picture of the screen and file it with your collection of machinery pictures. If in doubt, ask a kid how to do it.

    Larry
    How simple life can be, I tend to forget that. Although the last time a kid had my phone in her hands, it was unusable upon return. Cheers

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    Great tip. Thank you Larry.


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