Any good YouTube vids/series/channels for a kid starting out in machining?
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  1. #1
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    Default Any good YouTube vids/series/channels for a kid starting out in machining?

    I have a part time high school kid that is showing some real promise. I know there's thousands of channels revolving around machining.....................Is there any thorough/detailed channels that take you from the basics up to making some chips? Both informative and slightly entertaining? I was thinking of This Old Tony's channel or something similar. Any suggestions? I'm gong to try to do some more hands on stuff with him, but he's a busy kid and just getting the time to sit down and teach is tough. I figured if he can get some insight into a variety of concepts, he can at least hit the ground running without being completely clueless. TIA.......................

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    Here's a shop teacher that has a lot of beginner videos:

    YouTube

    Tubalcain

    Ted

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    Oxtools, Abom79, Joe Piezynski, Dudley Toolwright, Tubalcain, Keith Fenner

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    I will also recommend Keith Rucker and Robin Renzetti

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    This Old Tony really good also

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    I would say take a look at ClickSpring. His videos are beautiful and inspiring I think.

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    You can’t learn to be a machinist by setting at a computer screen. You have to invest the time to do it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SIP6A View Post
    You can’t learn to be a machinist by setting at a computer screen. You have to invest the time to do it.
    No kidding? Huh......................

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    I just got this email from Harvey, here's a link;

    How to Become a Machinist - In The Loupe - Machinist Blog


    look like it's worth a read

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    Stuart de Haro is a machining instructor that makes videos once in a while. They are usually very informative and to the point.

    YouTube

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    The Haas youtube channel has a lot of excellent videos too. There is also Edge Precision but its content is very advanced for a beginner.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SIP6A View Post
    You can’t learn to be a machinist by setting at a computer screen. You have to invest the time to do it.
    Watching videos about machining is investing time. Just like being in a classroom or reading a book. I'm not sure of any "method" of learning that simply involves time and trial and error. It'd be quite dangerous and likely expensive (dangerous to machinery) for this particular topic.

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    I'm an old fart, so my take is that reading is better than videos to start. For me, vids become "entertainment" too quickly, while sometimes delivering content too slowly.

    With a book, you can immeditely re-read a sentence or passage that wasn't clear at the first review. Skipping ahead, then back a few pages is easy, it's more of a pain with vids.

    Then we get to recommendations for reading. Not much help there, what I had is long gone. But there are threads here on "new machinist reading materials", in fact there's one active at the moment: Beginner looking to start metal turning

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    Quote Originally Posted by JCByrd24 View Post
    Watching videos about machining is investing time. Just like being in a classroom or reading a book. I'm not sure of any "method" of learning that simply involves time and trial and error. It'd be quite dangerous and likely expensive (dangerous to machinery) for this particular topic.
    Thinking you can park somebody in front of a computer screen and teach them to be a machinist or other metalworking trade is just nonsense. I see by your profile your an engineer. Why is it that people that went to collage think that if somebody that didn't go to college can do something it can't possibly take any skill?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Milland View Post
    I'm an old fart, so my take is that reading is better than videos to start. For me, vids become "entertainment" too quickly, while sometimes delivering content too slowly.

    With a book, you can immeditely re-read a sentence or passage that wasn't clear at the first review. Skipping ahead, then back a few pages is easy, it's more of a pain with vids.

    Then we get to recommendations for reading. Not much help there, what I had is long gone. But there are threads here on "new machinist reading materials", in fact there's one active at the moment: Beginner looking to start metal turning
    Some people learn easier by reading and others by watching.
    And it depends a lot on the subject too. Like trying to explain the use of telescopic bore gauges, vs seeing it on video.
    Even the best written explanation and 80% of people won't get it on first read. Less than stellar written explanation and they don't get it even after reading the same explanation 10 times.

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    I think I learn faster via video tbh but books are great to have on hand as a reference. Sometimes its just nicer to sit down and thumb through that 60 year old book for the experience, get away from the screens for a bit.
    Ive learnt a pile from both. Research, take some common sense out to the shop and learn the other half.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SIP6A View Post
    Thinking you can park somebody in front of a computer screen and teach them to be a machinist or other metalworking trade is just nonsense. I see by your profile your an engineer. Why is it that people that went to collage think that if somebody that didn't go to college can do something it can't possibly take any skill?
    This thread is not about teaching someone to be a machinist by parking them in from of a computer, it's about sparking interest in a kid who shows aptitude and potential but is time limited because their full time job is being a HS student. Much like my full time job is being an engineer. My machining experience is completely self taught on my own machines and from books, forums, and videos because for numerous reasons I can't just go to take a class and/or use someone else equipment. These youtube videos, much like these forums, can be incredibly helpful for someone learning who can't go to a full time apprenticeship or tech school.

    Also please don't put words in my mouth re: people who went to college. I never said anything like that, and you've made a very incorrect assumption about me because I'm an engineer, which many people on this board and in the trades in general do. There are good engineers and bad engineers out there just like there are "professional" machinists who come on this board and ask what speeds and feeds to run in xyz material or do everything by gut feel because they don't trust books or don't bother to look it up. Every field has a range of people in it from complete hacks to the brilliant. I don't judge anyone by their job title/degree/pay scale. I judge people by the work they do and the respect they show others. I work in a shipyard and am surrounded by trades people who are incredibly talented and also a bunch of complete dubs with no work ethic or brains. The talented ones tend not to but heads with the engineers and vice versa.

    As soon as my son is through college I'll likely "retire" from engineering to pursue a more hands on career because I've learned that's what I like to do. I was able to go to college for very little money 15-20 years ago and it's done very well for me, but having a kid in college I know how expensive it can be and what little you can get in return if you don't chose wisely. Quite frankly it's a pretty scary and I hope the pendulum swings very soon.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JCByrd24 View Post
    This thread is not about teaching someone to be a machinist by parking them in from of a computer, it's about sparking interest in a kid who shows aptitude and potential but is time limited because their full time job is being a HS student. Much like my full time job is being an engineer. My machining experience is completely self taught on my own machines and from books, forums, and videos because for numerous reasons I can't just go to take a class and/or use someone else equipment. These youtube videos, much like these forums, can be incredibly helpful for someone learning who can't go to a full time apprenticeship or tech school.

    Also please don't put words in my mouth re: people who went to college. I never said anything like that, and you've made a very incorrect assumption about me because I'm an engineer, which many people on this board and in the trades in general do. There are good engineers and bad engineers out there just like there are "professional" machinists who come on this board and ask what speeds and feeds to run in xyz material or do everything by gut feel because they don't trust books or don't bother to look it up. Every field has a range of people in it from complete hacks to the brilliant. I don't judge anyone by their job title/degree/pay scale. I judge people by the work they do and the respect they show others. I work in a shipyard and am surrounded by trades people who are incredibly talented and also a bunch of complete dubs with no work ethic or brains. The talented ones tend not to but heads with the engineers and vice versa.

    As soon as my son is through college I'll likely "retire" from engineering to pursue a more hands on career because I've learned that's what I like to do. I was able to go to college for very little money 15-20 years ago and it's done very well for me, but having a kid in college I know how expensive it can be and what little you can get in return if you don't chose wisely. Quite frankly it's a pretty scary and I hope the pendulum swings very soon.
    If you want to spark an interest Titans of CNC is a good start. Tons of content and a path to learning.

    Make Chips Boys !

    Ron


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