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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by ewlsey View Post
    Eh. Are you really doing some super secret stuff that no one else ever thought of? Most guys like talking about their work and are happy to show it off.
    ITAR
    "Deemed export"
    Look into the regulations and be properly scared off.
    In the 70s and 80's Japanese "tourists" would come here and take pictures of everything with their Nikons.
    Now the Chinese don't even need to show up cause we publish it all.
    How much learning have we done on the inner working in mainland China via youtube?...crickets
    Which one of us is winning the industrial war?

    Tinfoil hatAny Professional Youtube Metalworking Channels?

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  3. #42
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    I know it's human nature to think we are the only one who can do something. There's 7 billion people on this planet. Chances are excellent that someone else had the same idea.

    Remember when the Japanese were stealing all of our ideas? Then pretty soon we were all going to classes on the Toyota Production System. Who'd they steal that from? The auto industry is teaming with industry conferences and symposiums. Engineers will come up with a good idea and then spill the goods in an SAE paper that anyone can get their hands on.

    Like Bob said earlier, one of the principle ways that industry grows as a whole is from the constant movement of people from one company to the next. I don't care how many NDA documents you signed, you can't forget what you learned. No company wants to admit it, but it actually helps them all.

    You guys wear those ITAR regulations like a red badge of courage. That affects what, .01% of machine shops?

  4. #43
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    While I did some complaining and disagreed sometimes I did really like Don Bailey of Suburban Tool efforts.
    Seems he went away for us here.

    The no pictures, no cameras thing is interesting. Way back a video was obvious just to do a high speed of an application you were working on was 6 months of paper work and signatures.
    Now phones.......No way I'd try this.
    The customer will recognize their op and you get that meeting in Detroit that starts with "It seems that you never want to do business with XXXX or any of our suppliers in the future".

    Same is true in the tool sales world. If you work with a supplier and come up with a 50% cost reduction do you want this salesman telling others?
    He/she is now chomping at the bit to tell everyone else but hopefully realizes that talking too much ends up badly.
    Bob

  5. #44
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    I don't really like any of his in house project videos, but the ones where he goes out and visits other shops are very interesting. I like the trip to the machine rebuilder and the spindle rebuilder.

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  7. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by CarbideBob View Post
    While I did some complaining and disagreed sometimes I did really like Don Bailey of Suburban Tool efforts.
    The problem with Don is that he was probably the super shop stud in 1985, but now he owns the business and (as he admits a few times), hasn't been running gear in the shop for years. His techniques... christ, the gear he works on... is old codger. YouTube is already queer with videos about how to square stock or use an edge finder.

    Reality is, the opportunities out there for a man (or woman!) to feed their family by being a badass on a Bridgeport are very few and dwindling.

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  9. #46
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    +1 for Don Bailey .

    I don't think anyone has mentioned BrianB or BcBloc as he is on youtube ,I tend more to watch his Barn /shop updates but he does do repair type machining as well. I like the way he talks to his dog. Wes might not like him though as he is a Farm boy and might have got his shop for nothing, he does seem to be a grafter though.

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  11. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by ewlsey View Post
    I know it's human nature to think we are the only one who can do something. There's 7 billion people on this planet. Chances are excellent that someone else had the same idea.

    Remember when the Japanese were stealing all of our ideas? Then pretty soon we were all going to classes on the Toyota Production System. Who'd they steal that from? The auto industry is teaming with industry conferences and symposiums. Engineers will come up with a good idea and then spill the goods in an SAE paper that anyone can get their hands on.

    Like Bob said earlier, one of the principle ways that industry grows as a whole is from the constant movement of people from one company to the next. I don't care how many NDA documents you signed, you can't forget what you learned. No company wants to admit it, but it actually helps them all.

    You guys wear those ITAR regulations like a red badge of courage. That affects what, .01% of machine shops?
    I agree, of course, with the human nature comment. As a young engineer before the internet it was a struggle to find inspiration and examples of a certain task. The internet has removed those obstacles.

    Also agreeing with the totyoda/ SAE comments. W. Edwards Deming being the automotive guy who taught the Japanese quality control, so that we could "re-learn" it from Toyoda. The point is; So how'd that work out for the domestic automakers that had too much hubris (or saddled with onerous union labor) to implement a decent QC plan for decades?!?!

    A majority of my career has been spent where ITAR and NDA's are a consideration, so from my perspective .01% is wildly wrong.

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  13. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by sable View Post
    Wes might not like him though as he is a Farm boy and might have got his shop for nothing
    As I recall he works full time as an engineer. The farm building probably had a negative value when he started.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gkoenig View Post
    The problem with Don is that he was probably the super shop stud in 1985, but now he owns the business and (as he admits a few times), hasn't been running gear in the shop for years. His techniques... christ, the gear he works on... is old codger. YouTube is already queer with videos about how to square stock or use an edge finder.,,,,,.
    So what would you want to see? How to take a V-8 crank casting and turn it into a finished, fully cheeked, drilled, ground and polished part in under 5 minutes of total machining from raw stock to finish?
    How about machining an entire block from start to finish? Don't all small shops drill and tap 6 motor mount holes at under 4 seconds total? That's like watching paint dry for some.
    Other than the wow factor what good would that do you? You don't own this level of equipment and tooling.
    What is a good pro level video? One that aims straight at you, your machines, your work?
    Bob

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    I'd like to see things like high speed machining strategies that really work for various machines and materials. Same with turning inserts and chip breakers that work for various materials, machines, and parts.

    All the corporate videos show best case scenarios. I'd like to see what really works for guys day in and day out.

    Ditto on repairs. I love seeing what's under the sheet metal on various machines. I recently worked on a Mazak Intergrex B axis (leaking o-ring). Inside the B axis joint is the most marvelous assembly of beautifully machined parts one can imagine. I wish I could have taken a video of that.

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  19. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by ewlsey View Post
    .....
    All the corporate videos show best case scenarios. I'd like to see what really works for guys day in and day out.
    Will this ever happen when oh-shit is also shown? Can this ever get past the powers that be?
    Name a machine or tooling vendor putting out front a failure of their product in their video and explaining why. Yet it happens all the time.
    Bob

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    Default this is really the best???

    Quote Originally Posted by howieranger View Post
    ROBRENZ has sone very good videos especially if your interested in surface grinding and lapping.
    just checked out ROBRENZ, unwatchable.

    in between the fluorescent flicker, the out of focus closeups of his bald spot (a requirement in such video it seems), and the atrocious audio quality, he seems to be a reasonable guy, too bad. he isn't a total douch, he IS the exception there.

    oh and, how about leaving the key in a tool that rotates, by the way. if you NEVER do it in a lathe chuck, you NEVER do it in a boring head, (or a drill chuck either, in my book, even in the tailstock, just to be consistent). oh, and using a tapping head with a hand held vise (well, for 10-24 in aluminum, ok? what do you guys think? it's on YT we should do it right), and changing the workpiece with a slotting cutter spinning 1/8 " from your finger.. we all do stupid stuff, but we don't need to show how to, most do that just fine without instruction.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CarbideBob View Post
    So what would you want to see? How to take a V-8 crank casting and turn it into a finished, fully cheeked, drilled, ground and polished part in under 5 minutes of total machining from raw stock to finish?
    How about machining an entire block from start to finish? Don't all small shops drill and tap 6 motor mount holes at under 4 seconds total? That's like watching paint dry for some.
    Other than the wow factor what good would that do you? You don't own this level of equipment and tooling.
    What is a good pro level video? One that aims straight at you, your machines, your work?
    Bob
    Oh FFS...

    I think it would be awesome to see a super smart machinists, running modern gear, educating us about their experience/opinions on a range of stuff. Honestly? The same sort of videos the old codgers are making, but in the real-deal CNC world (not Tormachs).

    I'm super into this shit! I would watch an hour long video about getting amazing floor and wall finishes. I would skip the bar for a 3 part series about how to kick ass at drilling and rigid tapping in various materials. Hell, do a bunch of videos about 3D surfacing tools, techniques and strategies... and I'll be in front of my mill that night hitting on scrap bits, trying to make those techniques work.

    Sounds crazy? There are about a dozen dudes doing stuff like this with manual gear and vintage stuff, a couple of Tormach guys... and nobody running real shop gear (Brad @ Tactical Keychains and John Grimsmo have both graduated to real machines and sort of stopped with the YouTube education stuff so much).

    In other words, 202 level CNC machining sort of stuff. As CNC gear gets cheaper, and more people can afford to start climbing the learning curve, I think there is a huge appetite to learn about stuff like this.

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  23. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyanidekid View Post
    just checked out ROBRENZ, unwatchable.

    in between the fluorescent flicker, the out of focus closeups of his bald spot (a requirement in such video it seems), and the atrocious audio quality, he seems to be a reasonable guy, too bad. he isn't a total douch, he IS the exception there.
    Cool. You're totally free to go make your own videos and put yourself out there so anonymous people behind screen names like "cyanidekid" can shit on your effort.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cyanidekid View Post
    just checked out ROBRENZ, unwatchable.

    in between the fluorescent flicker, the out of focus closeups of his bald spot (a requirement in such video it seems), and the atrocious audio quality, he seems to be a reasonable guy, too bad. he isn't a total douch, he IS the exception there.
    Maybe you saw one of his first videos. The later ones he narrates. I'd give him another chance.


    oh and, how about leaving the key in a tool that rotates, by the way. if you NEVER do it in a lathe chuck, you NEVER do it in a boring head, (or a drill chuck either, in my book, even in the tailstock, just to be consistent).
    Meh.. thats more of a rule for new guys and like a union shop or something like that. I have no problem with a senior machinist doing it. He's not the type of guy that turns a lathe on with the chuck key in. You are right though, it's bad practice.


    oh, and using a tapping head with a hand held vise (well, for 10-24 in aluminum, ok? what do you guys think? it's on YT we should do it right),
    Totally fine, done it 10,000's of times WITHOUT a tapping head. Him doing that kind of shit is one of the reasons I like him. That's what haul ass machinist technique looks like.


    and changing the workpiece with a slotting cutter spinning 1/8 " from your finger.. we all do stupid stuff, but we don't need to show how to, most do that just fine without instruction.
    Again, totally fine for a senior guy like him. It's fine to do stuff that could be very dangerous as long as you are well aware of the danger. A careless person that doesn't pay close attention shouldn't do stuff like that. If someone watches his video, does what he does, and gets hurt, too bad for them.

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  27. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by gkoenig View Post
    Brad @ Tactical Keychains and John Grimsmo have both graduated to real machines and sort of stopped with the YouTube education stuff so much
    Someone explain this John Grimsmo guy to me. He appears to have bought a brand new Mori Seiki VMC and a brand new Nakamura lathe with live toys and a sub. I figure at least $300,000 in just those two machines, could be $400,000 or more depending on options. Plus he has a Tormach and other toys.

    Now, he numbers his knives, so we know he's made around 560 and they seem to sell for around $600. So, in the 4 or so years he's been at it, he's grossed $336,000. He and the other guy (his brother?) don't appear to have any other employment.

    I know it's my favorite drum to bang, but it sure looks like a strong case for spending daddy's money. If not, I must be doing things horribly wrong.

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    Quote Originally Posted by John Welden View Post
    Meh.. thats more of a rule for new guys and like a union shop or something like that. I have no problem with a senior machinist doing it. He's not the type of guy that turns a lathe on with the chuck key in. You are right though, it's bad practice.
    I never knew about this chuck key "rule" until I joined this forum. Every place I ever worked we always left the chuck key in the chuck. I mean, if you walk up to a lathe with an empty chuck there's about a 100% chance you are going to need to put the chuck key in the chuck. So, why not just leave it there?

    I can't recall it ever being an issue.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ewlsey View Post
    Someone explain this John Grimsmo guy to me. He appears to have bought a brand new Mori Seiki VMC and a brand new Nakamura lathe with live toys and a sub. I figure at least $300,000 in just those two machines, could be $400,000 or more depending on options. Plus he has a Tormach and other toys.

    Now, he numbers his knives, so we know he's made around 560 and they seem to sell for around $600. So, in the 4 or so years he's been at it, he's grossed $336,000. He and the other guy (his brother?) don't appear to have any other employment.

    I know it's my favorite drum to bang, but it sure looks like a strong case for spending daddy's money. If not, I must be doing things horribly wrong.
    I've been wondering the same thing! He bought a hell of a lathe to make knife screws. At the same time it's not like it's hard to finance a machine for 10 years, who knows.

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    That's the problem with the internet. Things are seldom what they seem. Here I am roughly the same age as this Grimsmo character. I'm in the same kind of industry. I work as hard or harder. Yet I've got a couple clapped out antique CNC machines and not much else. I don't see me signing on for a $400,000 purchase any time soon.

    I've worked for 100+ man shops with work in hand that would give us a 1 year pay back and they were terrified to spend that kind of money. And rightfully so.

    I wish these guys would be honest.

    Like Tom Lipton. What the fuck is "Ox Tools"? It's a hobby shop for a retired guy. It's not a business. Yet he feels the need to pretend like it is. Maybe it's useful for tax purposes but it rubs me the wrong way.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ewlsey View Post
    I never knew about this chuck key "rule" until I joined this forum. Every place I ever worked we always left the chuck key in the chuck. I mean, if you walk up to a lathe with an empty chuck there's about a 100% chance you are going to need to put the chuck key in the chuck. So, why not just leave it there?

    I can't recall it ever being an issue.
    I guess people tighten their work piece, leave the key in, and then turn on the lathe. I've never seen it happen, but I guess it must.

    There is a lot of safety minded people that make a huge deal out of stuff. I think a lot depends on the type of person you are and the environment you're in. Some dip shit kids in a high school shop need to be ridden pretty hard to prevent accidents. In my twenty years or so as a machinist, I've literally never seen more than a cut that required few stitches. And that was just a guy cutting his finger when he was polishing a mold cavity. I haven't seen one fucking accident with a machine tool, forklift, crane, wood working machine or anything else.

    I always think about keeping myself safe in a shop. The first thing I think about when using a dangerous machine is how it might get me.

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