Any true inch benchtop lathes available? (must be under 350 pounds) - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by dcsipo View Post
    Sorry, I was not trying to undermine your post, just occurred to me if I wanted a lathe with an 11" swing and limited length, it is hard to beat an HLV or the HLV-h, used in nice shape they can be had for well under 30k...the options you posted are all valid. I also like the Emcomat. but 30k I would get a small slant bed CNC lathe. At 30K the options are nedless.
    Remember the 350 lbs weight limit.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob F. View Post
    Remember the 350 lbs weight limit.
    that is truly forgettable , you only have to overcome gravity once during install. Yeah yeah,,,, hear ya. that makes the Emcomat sounds even better ...the original Maximat 11 was designed to be light and rigid for stair assisted manual install

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    I have an old Emco compact 8, sitting on a very long bench, the bench used for lots of things, weighs much less than 350 lb., but one person can't move it (well you can slide it and lift the ends), and it takes up a lot of useful bench space (need room for the headstock door to open, room to slide off the tailstock, left side needs to have lots of clearance to stick stock in the spindle). IMO, it's easier to move a heavy cabinet/stand (on a low-profile caster-base, jack, pallet-jack or otherwise), than it is to manhandle 350 pounds (even with two people).
    A compact stand is also more versatile on the ideal/most efficient spot to orient the tool (on an existing bench, has to sit parallel to the bench, etc),and overall footprint and accessibility.

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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    LOL! Family progressed from a 31-foot "International Land Yacht" to a Globetrotter, to a Bambi as Dad went Wally-Byaming in his retirement and "we kids" had gradually leaked away from the household ... so fewer bunks were needed.

    All I remember ... is that you were wore-out after DRIVING an all-day haul, and hauling the stink of yesterweek's cooked meals and your own body waste holding-tank's roof-vent ..WITH you....

    So bargain air-fares, Five-star hotels at 50% off the "rack rate" (easily found if you try..) or brilliant-lovely small B&B, self-catering, agri-turismo, Gasthaus, or Pensiones.. were CHEAPER "every now and then" ...

    ..instead of trailer investment, repairs, tires, brakes, fuel, tow-vehicle upkeep, "etc.' all freakin' YEAR long year after year after year!

    Smelled better, too!

    Possible exception Venetzia and the de-facto open-sewer canals.



    Even so.. skip the Gritti or the Monopole .. stay a few miles away on the "mainland".. do "day trips" into Venice ... and you can breath far better at night!

    Similar plan, MOST large "shiddies", the world-over...actually.
    Oddly we agree - one can stay in first class hotels anywhere in the US while traveling, much cheaper than going by RV of any kind. My buddy ( the
    same man selling the 9A above, says only two kinds drive RVs - those with pets, and fat people.

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    I would second the suggestion of a South Bend 9" lathe. With some effort, it is possible to find relatively lightly used, and these lathes are very well documented and there are folks that can refurbish them. I found one of these that had basically sat unused since original purchase from factory, had it rebuilt, installed DRO, new motor, new wick, etc and its as good a lathe as any of this form factor sold today. You have a budget, so you can afford to pay someone to do all the work. Don't get too hung up on buying a product that is still manufactured today, you are overly limiting your options. The older machines such as the South Bend are very easy to rebuild/maintain and easy to use and understand.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jim rozen View Post
    What's wrong with a 9" model A southbend? Real inch. Benchtop. Less than 350.
    Quote Originally Posted by jscpm View Post
    The Rivett is an antique lathe. I am looking for a lathe that is new and still being supported by the manufacturer.
    USA made South Bends are antiques at this point and there is no factory support since they ceased USA operations quite some time ago.

    From what I've heard the Wabeco is a decent lightweight lathe made in Germany rather than Asia. Unfortunate that they don't offer a QC gearbox though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scottl View Post
    From what I've heard the Wabeco is a decent lightweight lathe made in Germany rather than Asia. Unfortunate that they don't offer a QC gearbox though.
    Which makes it a Harry Homeshop toy.....

    Here's the place for YOU.....
    Projects and Articles on Our Forum! | The Hobby-Machinist

  9. #48
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    SB's sound nice.
    Unless you have actually used small good lathes with higher spindle speeds and solid, accurate workholding options (small Hardinges, e.g.)
    The specified plain bearing clearance for SB 9" or 10K is .0005 to .00075
    Sounds small - until compared with say Hardinge 25 millionths. (20 to 30 x difference)

    Jim R probably remembers my attempts to determine how much hydrodynamic action decreased this.
    The results were somewhat ambiguous - my torque wrench broke about the time it was getting interesting

    No matter, the rest of an SB is about similar re rigidity and repeatability. Very good in clean/new/well adjusted examples, but not in the same territory as higher end machines of similar conditions. And generally, the higher end machines will maintain those tolerances everywhere for much longer periods.

    Is OP request for a lab or test facility?

    smt

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    I just heard from the WABECO rep that they are no longer making the inch version, so it looks like I am out of luck there potentially.

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    If it can cut inch threads then I wouldn’t worry about it, stick a DRO on it and the handwheel graduations it won’t matter. The ballscrews on my manual Bridgeport are metric and it doesn’t have handwheels, it’s never bothered me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by stephen thomas View Post
    SB's sound nice.
    Unless you have actually used small good lathes with higher spindle speeds and solid, accurate workholding options (small Hardinges, e.g.)
    The specified plain bearing clearance for SB 9" or 10K is .0005 to .00075
    Sounds small - until compared with say Hardinge 25 millionths. (20 to 30 x difference)

    Jim R probably remembers my attempts to determine how much hydrodynamic action decreased this.
    The results were somewhat ambiguous - my torque wrench broke about the time it was getting interesting

    No matter, the rest of an SB is about similar re rigidity and repeatability. Very good in clean/new/well adjusted examples, but not in the same territory as higher end machines of similar conditions. And generally, the higher end machines will maintain those tolerances everywhere for much longer periods.

    Is OP request for a lab or test facility?

    smt
    Sounds nice - is nice. Lathe featured above is inch lead screw, under 350 lbs if you simply toss the bench. QC gearbox too.

    HLVH is way far over the limit weight-wise.

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    Maybe a Logan 10"? Scott Logan can still supply parts. Lathes.uk says about 435 lbs for a bench model. Ball bearing so can turn faster than a SB, though IMO it doesn't make that much difference. Just need to find a clean one but they come up frequently on CL and other places.

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    22K brand new, weight is 1450 lbs, but if you can afford the machine, you can afford to pay someone to move it.
    Standard Modern Lathe Models 1334 - Penn Tool Co., Inc

    Although not in current production, there was also a 10" swing model, iirc weight on it was closer to 1000lbs.

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    HLVH is way far over the limit weight-wise.
    To remind you, this has been addressed several times and we all agree.
    I have never suggested an HLV-H, that was others.
    In the post you quoted, it was merely a comparison of quality.
    The OP seems to be looking for something more Schaublin like, e.g.
    IOW, Find similar-to-Hardinge quality/tolerance that is still made. 4c or smaller spindle & lathe.
    Though that seems less & less likely?

    smt

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    Quote Originally Posted by stephen thomas View Post
    To remind you, this has been addressed several times and we all agree.
    I have never suggested an HLV-H, that was others.
    In the post you quoted, it was merely a comparison of quality.
    The OP seems to be looking for something more Schaublin like, e.g.
    IOW, Find similar-to-Hardinge quality/tolerance that is still made. 4c or smaller spindle & lathe.
    Though that seems less & less likely?

    smt
    Yahbut...

    It need NOT be "still made". Only in good condition.

    The money is "there", the time for a project, NOT?

    How about some other proud craftsman's pet restoration...of anything from Cataract though Schaublin.. to even a Myford?

    "Inch not Metric" is only a distraction.

    And he only needs the ONE. Not as if he has to kit-out a machine-hall with 100 of them and run a factory.

    A "table top" mini-CNC might even do him?

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    If this Wabeco otherwise fits your needs, and it s quality made machine worthy of the price, contact them and see if they'll quote what you want. Its not like you're asking BMW to change the shape of a fender or design a new engine....might even be able to spin it that its to their advantage - you'd be paying for the design change that would make it more appealing to many in North America

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mcgyver View Post
    If this Wabeco otherwise fits your needs, and it s quality made machine worthy of the price, contact them and see if they'll quote what you want. Its not like you're asking BMW to change the shape of a fender or design a new engine....might even be able to spin it that its to their advantage - you'd be paying for the design change that would make it more appealing to many in North America
    "Design change?"

    Seems to me . if that size and mass - and being "new", not a project - is soooocch a "BFD"?

    All one would need to do is add a bilingual DRO ... and an electronic leadscrew. Not a lot of money in the small DRO size and modest servo-drive-forces involved..

    .. and then Inch/Metric threading is "there".

    Seems a lot of money for what would become - for lack of space - drillpress vise "tooling" .....to 4400 lbs Avoir of Alzmetall AB5/S drillpress ... so as to stabilize the little .... what?

    "Edible dormouse" seem apt?


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    Quote Originally Posted by jscpm View Post
    I just heard from the WABECO rep that they are no longer making the inch version, so it looks like I am out of luck there potentially.
    Ya, know if I had 30K to burn and not enough room to house it, I would seriously consider having the parts farmed out to a reputable CNC shop. if you are worried about copyright and IP use some of the funds to hire a good IP lawyer. Your piece cost may be even lower at the end than spending the 30K on a lathe and having them produced in-house. If the lathe is for your own entertainment, the above analisys is moot.

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    90.4 lbs, and all cast iron....what's not to love ?
    7" x 12" Mini Metal Lathe

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    QT:[ if you are worried about copyright and IP use some of the funds to hire a good IP lawyer. ]

    I certainly hope that is not the reason for in-house. Production manufacturing is so much more difficult on even the best mini-lathe.

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