Any true inch benchtop lathes available? (must be under 350 pounds) - Page 5
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  1. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by lucky7 View Post
    I find it easier to swivel the top slide a couple of degrees off 90 if I'm trying to catch a tenth.

    Did part of my training on Standard Modern 13"ers. Liked em!

    L7
    So yes, decent machine and operator skills made close size possible.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bob View Post
    Not to be a jerk but what you did here is not what you claimed to be able to do
    Bob
    No offence taken. How so?

    "With a little trial and error it was easier to take a few tenths cut to get there but if needed I could take a tenth out."

    Not wanting to jack the OP's thread or blow my own horn but just wanted to tout the accuracy of some of the Emco machines.

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    I have to ask,; is the requirement corporate/work or hobby related?

    The reason I ask that is because within your constraints the best fit for hobby use with a max 30k budget would be a late model Super 11. They are slightly over your weight limit at about 375 pounds without stand but that's only 25 pounds over.

    They are not still made and thus no factory support but there are many out there in excellent shape and since the chuck mount is an industry standard, chucks are easy to source although items like steady rests might take some searching.

    If for some reason you MUST have a currently produced lathe I would say drop the inch requirement and get a metric Wabeco fitted with a DRO.

  4. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terry Keeley View Post
    Some here may scoff at this but I can reliably take a tenth out of a bore in aluminum with my S11, Iscar inserts and a good dial indicator on the cross slide (50 millionths cut).
    I believe it. Mine is also a much more accurate machine than I expected. I still prefer the Chipmaster for its rigidity and (IMO) better ergonomics but the Maximat 11 is a gem of a machine. I machine quite a bit of 316 on mine.

    PDW

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    Still made. RDG in Mytholmroyd bought the rights and most of the parts when the Beeston factory was closed:-

    Myford Ltd Home Page (British Engineering at its best)

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  8. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rand View Post
    Still made. RDG in Mytholmroyd bought the rights and most of the parts when the Beeston factory was closed:-

    Myford Ltd Home Page (British Engineering at its best)
    Comparing a Myford to a Maximat 11 - well, no.

    The only bit is, they're both lathes and nicely built.

    Functionally, hell no, a Myford is a small feeble machine. In a choice between a Maximat and a Myford, I'd take the Maximat in a heartbeat.

    PDW

    PDW

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    A v10p is the emco equivalent to a myford and it is a miserable piece of crap. And 11 is a different thing altogether. V10 has plain milled cross slide ways and is chintzy

    Sent from my SM-G973F using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by rblalexander View Post
    A v10p is the emco equivalent to a myford and it is a miserable piece of crap. And 11 is a different thing altogether. V10 has plain milled cross slide ways and is chintzy

    Sent from my SM-G973F using Tapatalk
    More like an Emco Compact 8 and a Myford IMO. About the same swing and rigidity.

    For those who don't know, the Compact 8 was the basis for all those shitty Asian 8x18 lathe shaped objects. And the original was nothing to get excited over. My FIL has one. He really should have known better.

    PDW

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    Concerning the Maximat, etc, I really would prefer a new lathe that is supported by the manufacturer. I don't want to get into a restoration job or have to start scouring eBay for accessories.

    Concerning the Schaublin, I think they only come in metric.

    I do not want an 11" swing / 1500 lb lathe for this use. I already have access to lathes of this class and do not need another. I want an 7-8" lathe in the range of 300-500 pounds. The bench where this is going is too small to comfortably fit an 11" lathe, and the lathe is probably going to have to be moved at least once, maybe twice in the next couple of years, and frankly I don't want to have to figure out how to move a 1500 lb object multiple times into and out of a tight space. This is a SMALL PARTS lathe.

    The WABECO rep said that they are no longer making the imperial version and that I should just get the DRO if I want to do imperial--something I am not enthusiastic about. However, it may be moot because they are not even taking orders right now due to supply chain problems.

    One option is that I get a chucker lathe, which would be a compromise, but there are some advantages too, so maybe that is the way to go.

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    Please clear something up: do you need lead screw threading on this machine?

    If not then a small bench lathe in the 7-8 inch size would do the job, like one of these. Just be sure to get an inch compound slide. First lathe below is an 8" swing machine, takes 4C collets. Second one is 7" swing, takes 3C collets. Both are inch-type compound slides. Both under 300 pounds and neither are supported by the manufacturers now. =)

    But you could have your pick of top flight machines like this for your price range.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails dscn0001.jpg   p-w_lathe.jpg  

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    Quote Originally Posted by jim rozen View Post
    Please clear something up: do you need lead screw threading on this machine?

    If not then a small bench lathe in the 7-8 inch size would do the job, like one of these. Just be sure to get an inch compound slide. First lathe below is an 8" swing machine, takes 4C collets. Second one is 7" swing, takes 3C collets. Both are inch-type compound slides. Both under 300 pounds and neither are supported by the manufacturers now. =)

    But you could have your pick of top flight machines like this for your price range.
    One could make a draw screw attachment for that pratt. One screw for each imperial and each metric pitch and turn that fine lathe into a thread cutting machine.

    and one can die-cut threads on the pratt.

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    he keeps on going on about imperial lead screw, so I guess thread cutting is essential

    Hardinge had that headstock mounted threading adapter on HC-AT(?), if that would fit on an HSL and it had a compound slide, that might fit his requirements apart from the "new" and "supported" though I can't really imagine what support one might need for such a small thing used occasionally, it sounds more and more like he is looking for the unicorn that doesn't exist...

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    The cross handwheel being inch would be desirable to me.

    The lead screw with having a change gear would be of little matter to me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jz79 View Post
    I can't really imagine what support one might need for such a small thing used occasionally, it sounds more and more like he is looking for the unicorn that doesn't exist...
    Sounds to me like he doesn’t want to buy any number of used lathes that will do the job just fine for him. His money, he can waste it on something new and spendy. Or maybe just pay a machinist/shop to do the jobs for him. Heck, I live in a small town and there’s three lathes that look to be in reasonable condition in the size he wants for sale locally. Anyone of them could have been in my shop and working two days after his first post.

    L7

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    For one who would pay $30K for a bench lathe, I would want the very best.
    When I hit the lotto I might buy a WABECO and have the cross made to Imperial

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    Current production (quality) lathe + 8" swing + inch leadscrew + under 350 lbs. = Unobtanium


    I think you'll havta open up your specs a little...

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    If not then a small bench lathe in the 7-8 inch size would do the job, like one of these. Just be sure to get an inch compound slide. First lathe below is an 8" swing machine, takes 4C collets. Second one is 7" swing, takes 3C collets. Both are inch-type compound slides. Both under 300 pounds and neither are supported by the manufacturers now. =)
    Hardinge had that headstock mounted threading adapter on HC-AT(?), if that would fit on an HSL and it had a compound slide, that might fit his requirements apart from the "new" and "supported"
    I already posted those options way back in post #2

    Lots of old Hardinge split beds and similar makes out there.
    Qualified it at the time, though:

    ...perhaps not so easy anymore to come up with the threading and power feed parts and gears.
    But if desperation sets in, there is in fact a complete kit with threading here, gearsets, and hobs that could be cleaned up, slides scraped, and fresh paint for, oh, $29,950.00 with free delivery to MA.

    It really is a strange state of affairs that no manual lathes of that size are made in the USA anymore, bar Levin. & Levin does not offer threading. It would seem that someone could make a run of a dozen or so at a time & make a decent living off the accessories. Size it right and the armed forces are a compulsory buyer. Like for the Versamils. Which is a one man shop. But apparently not.

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    I'm standing by for a clarification but by "imperial lead screw" he could be meaning "imperial crossfeed screw." Hence the specific question does he want to to do lead screw threading on the machine?

    When I want to cut threads on that small 7" lathe, I just put the turret on it and use a die head.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails dscn0062.jpg   dscn0073.jpg  

  24. #99
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    Will the die head do lense mounts and such?

    smt <-------multiple Geometrics for the turret, but leadscrew or chase threading opens up options.

  25. #100
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    Pick up one of these, program threads at whatever pitch you want:

    C56A 220V ADTECH Micro Mini CNC Lathe Machine Hardware Steel Metal Woodworking 606989560735 | eBay


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