Any true inch benchtop lathes available? (must be under 350 pounds) - Page 6
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 6 of 7 FirstFirst ... 4567 LastLast
Results 101 to 120 of 139
  1. #101
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Country
    SPAIN
    Posts
    5,874
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1697
    Likes (Received)
    930

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PDW View Post
    Comparing a Myford to a Maximat 11 - well, no.

    The only bit is, they're both lathes and nicely built.

    Functionally, hell no, a Myford is a small feeble machine. In a choice between a Maximat and a Myford, I'd take the Maximat in a heartbeat.

    PDW

    PDW
    I think I gotta get a garage/workshop and find a nice Maximat 11 with the mill head.
    Then CNC convert it as a project...

  2. #102
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    22,168
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    12744

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by barbter View Post
    I think I gotta get a garage/workshop and find a nice Maximat 11 with the mill head.
    Then CNC convert it as a project...
    You could just unroll yer Putz across a double-hung sash window and slam the window shut on it for a great deal less spend.

    That should get yah under 350 lbs. as least as far as the body-mass of the kardashian sashayinian thunder-thighed AKA "long-reach-required" pub-parakeets you hang out with?


  3. Likes pavt liked this post
  4. #103
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Eastern Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    7,829
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    6503
    Likes (Received)
    6927

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jscpm View Post
    Concerning the Maximat, etc, I really would prefer a new lathe that is supported by the manufacturer. I don't want to get into a restoration job or have to start scouring eBay for accessories.

    Concerning the Schaublin, I think they only come in metric.

    I do not want an 11" swing / 1500 lb lathe for this use. I already have access to lathes of this class and do not need another. I want an 7-8" lathe in the range of 300-500 pounds. The bench where this is going is too small to comfortably fit an 11" lathe, and the lathe is probably going to have to be moved at least once, maybe twice in the next couple of years, and frankly I don't want to have to figure out how to move a 1500 lb object multiple times into and out of a tight space. This is a SMALL PARTS lathe.

    The WABECO rep said that they are no longer making the imperial version and that I should just get the DRO if I want to do imperial--something I am not enthusiastic about. However, it may be moot because they are not even taking orders right now due to supply chain problems.

    One option is that I get a chucker lathe, which would be a compromise, but there are some advantages too, so maybe that is the way to go.
    In that case you are probably limited to a Taiwanese machine. Some of the better examples as OK as home shop or light duty engineering shop. Many are advertised as true inch.

    Sadly for you, this is not a good time for what you seek, with the most suitable examples long out of production. For light duty use in a home shop a current Taiwan machine will have to do. Not perfect but your requirements eliminate all the better modern lathes as too big and too heavy.

  5. #104
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New York
    Posts
    1,080
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    734
    Likes (Received)
    609

    Default

    FFS, just crack open the Grizzly catalog and get the current production Heavy 10. Very well supported, high-class NTN bearings, A-B electrics, hardened ways, etc etc. It has been decades since Taiwanese machines were "low-end". And yes you get dual inch/metric dials, native inch lead screw, and DRO on that for about 1/2 of your budget. Spend the rest of the budget on tooling it up.

    Else sit there and get nothing, because nothing meets your specs. Unless you want a restoration project.

  6. #105
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Australia (Hobart)
    Posts
    4,111
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    652
    Likes (Received)
    3299

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by barbter View Post
    I think I gotta get a garage/workshop and find a nice Maximat 11 with the mill head.
    Then CNC convert it as a project...
    Whatever floats your boat.

    I'd skip the milling head myself, though. They're not all that great. I have one - the complete FB-2 package. Mainly use it for plastics and aluminium. It doesn't really like 316. fine with me, I have 3 other milling machines.

    Like all home-brew CNC conversions I can't see the point unless you figure out how to install an ATC because stopping to swap tools and re-set offsets kind of defeats the purpose of CNC IMO.

    PDW

  7. #106
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    CANADA
    State/Province
    Ontario
    Posts
    1,725
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    576
    Likes (Received)
    672

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pavt View Post
    FFS, just crack open the Grizzly catalog and get the current production Heavy 10. Very well supported, high-class NTN bearings, A-B electrics, hardened ways, etc etc. It has been decades since Taiwanese machines were "low-end". And yes you get dual inch/metric dials, native inch lead screw, and DRO on that for about 1/2 of your budget. Spend the rest of the budget on tooling it up.

    Else sit there and get nothing, because nothing meets your specs. Unless you want a restoration project.

    Looks like they tried to copy a lot of the Super 11 features, the carriage is almost an identical copy:

    Heavy 10, 10" x 30" Gearhead Lathe at Grizzly.com

    Plastic gears tho? I like how they put that big "Made in USA" sticker on the stand, lol.

    Ships at 645 lbs.

  8. #107
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    14,399
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4902
    Likes (Received)
    5207

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Terry Keeley View Post
    Looks like they tried to copy a lot of the Super 11 features, the carriage is almost an identical copy:

    Heavy 10, 10" x 30" Gearhead Lathe at Grizzly.com

    Plastic gears tho? I like how they put that big "Made in USA" sticker on the stand, lol.

    Ships at 645 lbs.
    If they would just make the whole lathe out of plastic they could get the weight down to the OPs requirements.

    With the right kind of paint, nobody would know the difference.

    Likely that sticker is "Made In USA." it is a nice sticker.

    They get them from Amazon 2cents each
    Amazon.com : made in usa stickers

  9. Likes dalmatiangirl61, Terry Keeley liked this post
  10. #108
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Eastern Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    7,829
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    6503
    Likes (Received)
    6927

    Default

    Seeing that this thread is still going strong and the title is "Any true inch benchtop lathes available? (must be under 350 pounds)", I can't resist posting this link as an answer.

    MicroLux(R) 7x16 Mini Lathe

    While it sounds funny even the smallest (10 x 22) true inch at Precision ******** is 395 pounds without stand!

    So basically either revise your requirements or settle for a lightweight "toy".

  11. Likes mhajicek liked this post
  12. #109
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    peekskill, NY
    Posts
    27,602
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    6491

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by stephen thomas View Post
    Will the die head do lense mounts and such?
    ...
    Not in a schaublin 70 turret! (that's the one shown there)

  13. #110
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    22,168
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    12744

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Scottl View Post
    Seeing that this thread is still going strong and the title is "Any true inch benchtop lathes available? (must be under 350 pounds)", I can't resist posting this link as an answer.

    MicroLux(R) 7x16 Mini Lathe
    Might be a joke to Old Skewl chip-warriors, but truth told.. it really is all the poor sod can make effective use of.

    I mean.. when your primary priority is how easily you can make multiple EXPECTED changes of residence ... up and down stairs?

    Tellin' him he needs an adult-sized machine-tool is like trying to convince a Russian "mafia" hit man he should give up a silenced pistol ... and travel with a surplused Kamaz-mounted "Grad" rocket battery.

    Problem being .. the Russian would agree it an effective upgrade ...and JF DO it!



    At which point... A used box truck.. as "residence".

    With the machine shop on wheels? Now yah only have to move your OWN SELF "up and down stairs".

    How's THAT for a "nomadic lifestyle"?


  14. #111
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Minnesota
    Posts
    2,311
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3197
    Likes (Received)
    1680

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Scottl View Post
    Seeing that this thread is still going strong and the title is "Any true inch benchtop lathes available? (must be under 350 pounds)", I can't resist posting this link as an answer.

    MicroLux(R) 7x16 Mini Lathe

    While it sounds funny even the smallest (10 x 22) true inch at Precision ******** is 395 pounds without stand!

    So basically either revise your requirements or settle for a lightweight "toy".
    That looks pretty decent. If I weren't getting my dad's (formerly my grandfather's) 9" Craftsman/Atlas (with the quick change gear box), I might go for one of those to facilitate the work I'll be putting through my new CM-1.

  15. #112
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    22,168
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    12744

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mhajicek View Post
    That looks pretty decent. If I weren't getting my dad's (formerly my grandfather's) 9" Craftsman/Atlas (with the quick change gear box), I might go for one of those to facilitate the work I'll be putting through my new CM-1.
    I ASSURE you.. it is a BETTER machine than an @las!

    Primarily because only the Sears predecessor - Dunlap was it? - ever made a WORSE lathe-shaped-object!

    Which is a crying shame.. because Atlas actually made right-decent punch-presses. And COULD HAVE made a FAR better LSO.

    If...Sears overly-greedy buyers had but ASKED it of their suppliers.

    Monkey-Ward had the good sense to put their Powr-Kraft label on some right-decent "Logan" lathes for example.

    Logans earned respect as good value for small-money, got the job done, made more friends than enemies as a viable alternative to a South Bend. Still do. Still ARE!

    @las was exposed as a bad joke. And it wasn't the ZAMAK, oddly enough. It was the butter-soft rectangular ways and sorry-ass gibs.

    DAMHIKT!

    A measure of "justice" exists amongst machine-tools, whether the rest of the world notices or never.

  16. #113
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Eastern Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    7,829
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    6503
    Likes (Received)
    6927

    Default

    The thing is, the lathe you've got (or can get) is better than the one you don't have. There are many apartment dwellers who are limited to machines that are 100 lbs. or less.

    Less than ideal? Yes, but they can turn metal although at a lesser removal rate. A lot of good work has been done on "toy" machines.

    My WW lathe isn't all that small but has very limited travel and no threading capability. That didn't stop me from getting stuff done including light milling with a DIY angle plate. The travel is limited because there is no carriage, only a cross slide with top slide that is positioned along the bed and a clamp knob tightened. Threading without a chaser attachment was strictly tap and die. But it WAS a lathe.

  17. Likes mhajicek liked this post
  18. #114
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Cambridge, MA
    Posts
    1,871
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    83
    Likes (Received)
    1093

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pavt View Post
    FFS, just crack open the Grizzly catalog and get the current production Heavy 10. Very well supported, high-class NTN bearings, A-B electrics, hardened ways, etc etc. It has been decades since Taiwanese machines were "low-end". And yes you get dual inch/metric dials, native inch lead screw, and DRO on that for about 1/2 of your budget. Spend the rest of the budget on tooling it up.

    Else sit there and get nothing, because nothing meets your specs. Unless you want a restoration project.
    This is really good idea, thanks. I had actually looked at the Grizzly 8" and though it had the right form factor, the quality was below what I would want. However, I did not realize that Grizzly had a "heavy" series of lathes, that are higher quality. The 10" is a little bigger than what I wanted, but I think I could live with it.

  19. #115
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Minnesota
    Posts
    2,311
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3197
    Likes (Received)
    1680

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    I ASSURE you.. it is a BETTER machine than an @las!
    That may be true, but I've made a lot of parts on that Atlas, starting from when I could see over the bed, so it's pretty second nature to me, might even say first nature. I can also guarantee it'll be worth more than the $0 I'll be paying for it!

  20. Likes Scottl liked this post
  21. #116
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Maryland
    Posts
    3,382
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2711
    Likes (Received)
    2467

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jscpm View Post
    This is really good idea, thanks. I had actually looked at the Grizzly 8" and though it had the right form factor, the quality was below what I would want. However, I did not realize that Grizzly had a "heavy" series of lathes, that are higher quality. The 10" is a little bigger than what I wanted, but I think I could live with it.
    how about something like this? CC-D6000Ehs High Speed Benchtop CNC Lathe - MDA Precision

    They also seem to sell Wabeco manual lathes.

  22. #117
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Georgia
    Posts
    600
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    420
    Likes (Received)
    263

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jscpm View Post
    This is really good idea, thanks. I had actually looked at the Grizzly 8" and though it had the right form factor, the quality was below what I would want. However, I did not realize that Grizzly had a "heavy" series of lathes, that are higher quality. The 10" is a little bigger than what I wanted, but I think I could live with it.
    Quote Originally Posted by dcsipo View Post
    how about something like this? CC-D6000Ehs High Speed Benchtop CNC Lathe - MDA Precision

    They also seem to sell Wabeco manual lathes.
    dcsipo may have found exactly what you are looking for:

    WABECO D6000 LATHE - MDA Precision

    Click on *Specifications*.

    The above link shows a Wabeco D6000 Standard (as opposed to Metric). You may be able to call and -- if you are fortunate -- get one from their stock.

  23. #118
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New York
    Posts
    1,080
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    734
    Likes (Received)
    609

    Default

    Grizzly's higher quality lathes, with all the things I mentioned are called "South Bend" because Grizzly own South Bend -- and they still make the Heavy Ten of South Bend fame. Of course it is modernized. They are definitely a step up from the generic Taiwanese machines. They are fairly proud of them, tho.

    Quote Originally Posted by jscpm View Post
    This is really good idea, thanks. I had actually looked at the Grizzly 8" and though it had the right form factor, the quality was below what I would want. However, I did not realize that Grizzly had a "heavy" series of lathes, that are higher quality. The 10" is a little bigger than what I wanted, but I think I could live with it.

  24. #119
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    CANADA
    State/Province
    Ontario
    Posts
    1,725
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    576
    Likes (Received)
    672

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jscpm View Post
    This is really good idea, thanks. I had actually looked at the Grizzly 8" and though it had the right form factor, the quality was below what I would want. However, I did not realize that Grizzly had a "heavy" series of lathes, that are higher quality. The 10" is a little bigger than what I wanted, but I think I could live with it.

    Plastic gears and all! Personally I wouldn't touch anything made by Jizzly with a 10' pole.

    And that "Southbend" is way overpriced, about 50% of that 9K price tag is in the name.

  25. Likes dcsipo liked this post
  26. #120
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    22,168
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    12744

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Terry Keeley View Post
    And that "Southbend" is way overpriced, about 50% of that 9K price tag is in the name.
    Be nice.

    It's the only half that has ANY value.

    If one is going to buy marginal shite, at least one should only pay marginal price FOR it.

  27. Likes Terry Keeley liked this post

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •