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  1. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by David_M View Post
    dcsipo may have found exactly what you are looking for:

    WABECO D6000 LATHE - MDA Precision

    Click on *Specifications*.

    The above link shows a Wabeco D6000 Standard (as opposed to Metric). You may be able to call and -- if you are fortunate -- get one from their stock.
    Yes, MDA is the US dealer for WABECO. Even though they have an inch WABECO shown on their website, they do not actually have any of them, AND all WABECO's are backordered, AND they are discontinuing the imperial version so when it becomes available again you will not be able to get the inch version.

    Concerning the mini-CNC, the kind of guys I might have operating the lathe do not have PhDs from MIT, so getting a lathe that requires reading a 300 page instruction manual will not work.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jscpm View Post
    .. the kind of guys I might have operating the lathe do not have PhDs from MIT, so getting a lathe that requires reading a 300 page instruction manual will not work.
    Can't seem to get even THREE pages in, so far...???

    CNC has safety enclosures "often as not".

    Work and moving parts are on the inside. Buttons are on the outside.

    Hobby lathes, "not as often".

    Sooooo yer more likely to need good insurance ...

    ...because THEY are more likely to have access to ambulance-chasers than to Piled higher and Drier add-on to "BS" and More of the Same AKA "MS" degree credentials...


  3. #123
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    I guess I should move to Virginia since they apparently have lots of second operation workers who can operate CNC lathes for wage rates just waiting to be employed.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jscpm View Post
    I guess I should move to Virginia since they apparently have lots of second operation workers who can operate CNC lathes for wage rates just waiting to be employed.
    Wrong State. Surely you have heard the term "Virginia Delegates?

    That's a verb. Not a noun.

    We ELECT fools to do stupid things FOR us.

    We don't WORK for them ... to do stupid things ourselves.

    Take our famous Patrick Henry.

    Not satisfied with having two first names, he said:

    "Give me liberty, or give me death!'

    Then - as with any other greedy politician - he managed to take BOTH!

  5. #125
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    QT:[ AND all WABECO's are back ordered, AND they are discontinuing the imperial version ]

    Likely there is a guy here on PM that would quote putting an Imperial lead screw and handwheel on the crossfeed in/on the metric WABECO. For a guy thinking about up to $30K for what he wants that should be an easy solution.

    Just a simple screw and nut would be OK.

    The WABBCO seems to be a very nice bench lathe.

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    Quote Originally Posted by michiganbuck View Post
    QT:[ AND all WABECO's are back ordered, AND they are discontinuing the imperial version ]

    Likely there is a guy here on PM that would quote putting an Imperial lead screw and handwheel on the crossfeed in/on the metric WABECO. For a guy thinking about up to $30K for what he wants that should be an easy solution.

    Just a simple screw and nut would be OK.

    The WABBCO seems to be a very nice bench lathe.
    Right, I have no problem modifying the lathe if that is the only solution, but that brings us back to the fundamental problem which is that they are backordered and I can't even order the metric version right now.

    I have half a mind to get into manufacturing the lathe myself. Seems like there is a market gap.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jscpm View Post

    I have half a mind to get into manufacturing the lathe myself. Seems like there is a market gap.
    Don’t think you’ll find many people willing to spend 30K on a tiny manual lathe. Would be smarter to spend some money now on a heavier, more rigid, better lathe and some on machinery movers when the time comes, but that doesn’t seem to be the plan. Good luck.

    L7

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    If I made that lathe I would put in a 1 1/2" spindle bore, and add a taper attachment, so a way to release the cross screw.

    But it would be a tough project to designing and build from scratch..rebuilding a used one would be much easier...

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    Quote Originally Posted by lucky7 View Post
    Don’t think you’ll find many people willing to spend 30K on a tiny manual lathe. Would be smarter to spend some money now on a heavier, more rigid, better lathe and some on machinery movers when the time comes, but that doesn’t seem to be the plan. Good luck.

    L7
    Agree and you won't find many willing to spend $300K for a car or $10k for a watch but they do sell.
    Last edited by michiganbuck; 07-24-2021 at 03:13 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by michiganbuck View Post
    If I made that lathe I would put in a 1 1/2" spindle bore, but it would be a tough project with designing from scratch..rebuilding a used one would be much easier.
    If I went to the trouble of designing a new lathe, I would make 1000 of them, not just one. It's not just the spindle bore, if you look at the design of a lot typical lathes, even high quality Swiss and German machines, there is a lot of 1950s era features that could be improved. Just in materials alone, there are a lot of specialized materials like cast steel, sintered printings and carbon fiber that didn't exist or were too expensive in 1950, but are feasible now. Also, with modern motors I bet I could achieve a 2 HP design using only 110V single phase. Right there I would have a big win. A design from scratch could make a lot of fundamental improvements.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jscpm View Post
    Right, I have no problem modifying the lathe if that is the only solution, but that brings us back to the fundamental problem which is that they are backordered and I can't even order the metric version right now.

    I have half a mind to get into manufacturing the lathe myself. Seems like there is a market gap.

    With your budget and willingness to have someone modify it with an imperial leadscrew I think the best benchtop lathe you can get is a Weiler Primus. It is way more lathe than a Wabeco and more stout looking than the Schaublin benchtop. You could import one from Europe, modify it and still have a large chunk of your budget leftover.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jscpm View Post
    If I went to the trouble of designing a new lathe, I would make 1000 of them, not just one. It's not just the spindle bore, if you look at the design of a lot typical lathes, even high quality Swiss and German machines, there is a lot of 1950s era features that could be improved. Just in materials alone, there are a lot of specialized materials like cast steel, sintered printings and carbon fiber that didn't exist or were too expensive in 1950, but are feasible now. Also, with modern motors I bet I could achieve a 2 HP design using only 110V single phase. Right there I would have a big win. A design from scratch could make a lot of fundamental improvements.

    There's a used D6000 at auction in Europe. No idea if it is metric or inch but presume it is metric. You would get it for much less than new cost, but shipping and rigging cost will be up there.


    Here's something that may be of interest: Arduino based conversion for metric D6000 to carry out Inch threading.

    PELS is an Arduino based Electronic Lead Screw (ELS) system which enables one to conduct Imperial threading and conventional turning on a benchtop lathe which normally requires gear or pulley changes to provide different threading options. This hardware/software was specifically designed for the Wabeco D6000 lathe and permits all common Imperial threading options to be performed, which include 10, 11, 12, 13, 16, 20, 24, 28, 32, 36, 40, 44, 48 and 52 threads/inch. In addition it provides conventional turning at three pitches/spindle revolution of: ‘normal’ ( 0.0019 inches), ‘coarse’ (0.0039 inches) and ‘fine’ (0.00150 inches).
    GitHub - atelierdbp/D6000-electronic-lead-screw-imperial-threads: Arduino electronic leadscrew software for a D6000 Wabeco lathe

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    Quote Originally Posted by jscpm View Post
    Yes, MDA is the US dealer for WABECO. Even though they have an inch WABECO shown on their website, they do not actually have any of them, AND all WABECO's are backordered, AND they are discontinuing the imperial version so when it becomes available again you will not be able to get the inch version.

    Concerning the mini-CNC, the kind of guys I might have operating the lathe do not have PhDs from MIT, so getting a lathe that requires reading a 300 page instruction manual will not work.
    does it really require a 300-page manual ? the conversational controls on modern CNC lathes make them pretty self explabatory.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jscpm View Post
    If I went to the trouble of designing a new lathe, I would make 1000 of them, not just one. It's not just the spindle bore, if you look at the design of a lot typical lathes, even high quality Swiss and German machines, there is a lot of 1950s era features that could be improved. Just in materials alone, there are a lot of specialized materials like cast steel, sintered printings and carbon fiber that didn't exist or were too expensive in 1950, but are feasible now. Also, with modern motors I bet I could achieve a 2 HP design using only 110V single phase. Right there I would have a big win. A design from scratch could make a lot of fundamental improvements.
    what would be your target price for a 9x24 is benchtop lathe? I would also argue that a modern lathe would be better suited with linear guides and ball screws even for manual op. hey in that mode why not make it a CNC lathe that also has manual controls then you are in the 25K+ ballpark that would be attractive. a 2HP servo for the headstock might leave enough power to run the leadscrew and cross slide. you can only pull 1800W from a 15 amp circuit, would need 20 amp for more headroom.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jscpm View Post
    If I went to the trouble of designing a new lathe, I would make 1000 of them, not just one. It's not just the spindle bore, if you look at the design of a lot typical lathes, even high quality Swiss and German machines, there is a lot of 1950s era features that could be improved. Just in materials alone, there are a lot of specialized materials like cast steel, sintered printings and carbon fiber that didn't exist or were too expensive in 1950, but are feasible now. Also, with modern motors I bet I could achieve a 2 HP design using only 110V single phase. Right there I would have a big win. A design from scratch could make a lot of fundamental improvements.
    There's no "design win" @ 2 HP.

    And whom d'you think you are you kidding? How can you "design" what you do not even understand?

    The lathes in the market from a thousand makers the past several hundred years ARE the product of CONSTANT "improvements".

    Off the back of lessons learned.

    And the NEEDS - sometimes bleedin' DESPERATE needs .. of folk willing to PAY serious coin for what they need!

    Industry in more than a hundred nations is not what is out-of-sync with real-world needs. Wannabees are what is out of touch with reality.

    You?

    .. cannot even keep the email address you sent "from" via PM as functional!

    Just got a "bounce" from yahoo's MTA:

    ".....This mailbox is disabled (554.30).

    ...off my reply to your note!

    Well, Hell... why should the yahoo mailbox be any different from your ability to learn and grow?

    "Disabled"


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    Kicking the dead horse a last time: If moving into a basement or such is a problem, if one took an HLVH off the stand, removed the motor from the stand, none of the pieces would likely be over 600 pounds, and not very large/dangerous/cumbersome to move. Once put back together, it's easier to move 2000 pounds with wheels (stand, pallet-jack, etc), than manhandle 350, and a "benchtop" lathe takes up a whole lot of bench space (arguably as much as a stand, with less placement flexibility). For $30K, I'd find a way to use one of Mr.Babin's rebuilt HLVH's (either and EM or with the electronic leadscrew)--they could probably even put it on a somewhat smaller stand if that's an issue. Functionally, what could be better, with easily available tooling, accessories parts, etc.

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    Right there I would have a big win. A design from scratch could make a lot of fundamental improvements.

    I can visualize a number of surface grinder simple improvements, but no way would I design a full machine from ground up. Likely the best SG machine would be B&S 13 grinder base having pressure oil way lube, with a through-hole and twin V way or Box columns... possibly with an air wheel head spindle, ball screw for long, cross, and down, controllable many travel speeds with the ability to be different in the other direction, variable wheel speeds, and a good DRO.
    That could be operated manually or automatically with having an incremental down feed, a probe the gauge stop good or 20 millionths or less).

    I was going to mention the Weiler Primus but thought that they don't make that anymore and the Op wanted New.
    Here is a 2014 machine that looks nice.
    ▷ Used Weiler Primus for sale - Machineseeker

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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Be nice.

    It's the only half that has ANY value.

    If one is going to buy marginal shite, at least one should only pay marginal price FOR it.
    Only in fantasy land. Just because your employers taxes got cut to zero doesn't mean you're gonna get a raise. I certainly wouldn't turn up my nose at the SB. Metal gears and all.

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    Quote Originally Posted by michiganbuck View Post
    Right there I would have a big win. A design from scratch could make a lot of fundamental improvements.

    I can visualize a number of surface grinder simple improvements, but no way would I design a full machine from ground up. Likely the best SG machine would be B&S 13 grinder base having pressure oil way lube, with a through-hole and twin V way or Box columns... possibly with an air wheel head spindle, ball screw for long, cross, and down, controllable many travel speeds with the ability to be different in the other direction, variable wheel speeds, and a good DRO.
    That could be operated manually or automatically with having an incremental down feed, a probe the gauge stop good or 20 millionths or less).

    I was going to mention the Weiler Primus but thought that they don't make that anymore and the Op wanted New.
    Here is a 2014 machine that looks nice.
    ▷ Used Weiler Primus for sale - Machineseeker
    Sorry, my bad It is a 1998 machine and repaint at that. Such a late machine should have original paint so don't buy this one. And it seems some small Weilers have a 40mm bore and others only a 23mm bore...Darn.

    40mm, over 1 1/2 now we at talking about a useful lathe.

    Wait, they do still make new;
    Primus VCD - WEILER


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