Anyone know of a saw with a large miter capacity? - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Put a pin in the floor centered under the saw, and a caster under each corner
    to swing the saw.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob F. View Post
    Ellis is another, common in fab shops.
    Yes, but they won't swing all the way to 20 degrees. I have an Ellis 1600, which is limited to 45 degrees either way.

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    The saw my buddy has I believe is a Ellis 2000, which will rotate to 60 degrees. I just couldn't remember the name until someone mentioned it.

    One of the pictures in the link shows the vise rotated 90 degrees to make a shallow angle cut in what looks like 8in pipe.

    2000 Mitre Band Saw - Ellis Mfg, Inc.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kenton View Post
    One of the pictures in the link shows the vise rotated 90 degrees to make a shallow angle cut in what looks like 8in pipe.

    2000 Mitre Band Saw - Ellis Mfg, Inc.
    In the pic you are talking about the head is just rotated to the extreme, vise is in its normal position, a better view is of the short pieces of square tube in one of the other pics.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob F. View Post
    In the pic you are talking about the head is just rotated to the extreme, vise is in its normal position, a better view is of the short pieces of square tube in one of the other pics.
    Looking at it again, you are correct.

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    Their specs say 90, 45, and 60 degrees. I think those numbers are not from the same reference and the 60 degrees is really 30 degrees in the same frame of reference as the first two. But the OP wanted to get this down to 20 degrees.

    I think this could be done with a track saw with an abrasive blade. With the proper accessories, like a good protractor, you could make the set-up fast and easy. And you could probably get down to 20 degrees. I had a longer post on this, but it somehow got lost. I don't feel like reconstructing it, but will discuss further if there is any interest.



    Quote Originally Posted by kenton View Post
    The saw my buddy has I believe is a Ellis 2000, which will rotate to 60 degrees. I just couldn't remember the name until someone mentioned it.

    One of the pictures in the link shows the vise rotated 90 degrees to make a shallow angle cut in what looks like 8in pipe.

    2000 Mitre Band Saw - Ellis Mfg, Inc.

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    We have a Marvel II series 8. Easy peasy to set up a fence bolted to the T-slots in the table to cut 20 degrees. Heck then you could still tilt the head over for some really funky compound angles. God I love that saw! I smile every time I walk over and cut something on it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Econdron View Post
    I'm looking for a saw that can cut 4" square tubing at up to a steep 20 degree included angle. I have a bandsaw that can cut it up to about 35 degrees. We are a job shop, so this is not for production, but we frequently need to cut steep angles, and waste a lot of time with angle finders and cut-off wheels trying to cut the custom angles. Tubing size and angles vary quite a bit, 4" tubing at a 20 degree angle is just the capacity I would like it to go up. Tube laser is out of the question.
    Quote Originally Posted by garyhlucas View Post
    We have a Marvel II series 8. Easy peasy to set up a fence bolted to the T-slots in the table to cut 20 degrees. Heck then you could still tilt the head over for some really funky compound angles. God I love that saw! I smile every time I walk over and cut something on it.
    What is the OP's budget ?

    And how much floor space is avail ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    What is the OP's budget ?

    And how much floor space is avail ?
    I don't mean to be frugal, I just don't have a lot of money and don't want to finance equipment. Maybe $10K. Possibly more if it were something that I really felt like had a lot of value other than just cutting the unique angles. Floor space I could re-arrange if necessary, I have a good amount of floor space available.

    The biggest problem is that we only need to cut the angles on maybe 4 pieces, sometimes both sides, so maybe 8 cuts per job. Here's an example of one of the products we make (just the metal):

    criss-cross-base_5.jpg

    They're made to order, sometimes people will request something like 84" L x 27" H made from 4" square tubing, which would be a 20.4* cut. And it would only be on the long pieces, so 4 cuts total. The cutting wheels or Hypertherm are what we currently use, but we need to be pretty precise otherwise there's large gaps. On the example above, being off by 1 degree will leave 1/4" gap on one side.

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    You might be ahead to focus on some kind of bug-O like track for your plasma or even for angle grinders.

    Your product makes sense, but those ends will be difficult (for the long case)

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    We actually got the Marvel 1970 vintage off Ebay for $4K including shipping. Why an old Marvel? Every part was still available, unlike lots of others.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gregormarwick View Post
    I have seen some horizontal bandsaws that have a fixed vice and the whole saw bow rotates around the centreline of the vice for mitreing. Thomas are one brand like that.
    Yep. That's pretty much how they all are. I think if the vise and saw both swiveled you would just rotate the entire the entire thing and not cut angle right?

    If you use a vise on a saw to miter angles, even at 45 degrees, you aren't holding onto much and you sure as hell aren't holding onto a shorter part.

    I don't believe there's any way you can make a vise hold parts well at much of an angle in a bandsaw. It just doesn't work. If you need a special angle you are going to be using clamps and guides to get it there. It's easy and you don't need a special saw to do it. Just a creative mind.

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    If you do the same size tube, you can build a cutting guide for the cutting wheel.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by Econdron View Post
    I don't mean to be frugal, I just don't have a lot of money and don't want to finance equipment. Maybe $10K. Possibly more if it were something that I really felt like had a lot of value other than just cutting the unique angles. Floor space I could re-arrange if necessary, I have a good amount of floor space available.

    The biggest problem is that we only need to cut the angles on maybe 4 pieces, sometimes both sides, so maybe 8 cuts per job. Here's an example of one of the products we make (just the metal):

    criss-cross-base_5.jpg

    They're made to order, sometimes people will request something like 84" L x 27" H made from 4" square tubing, which would be a 20.4* cut. And it would only be on the long pieces, so 4 cuts total. The cutting wheels or Hypertherm are what we currently use, but we need to be pretty precise otherwise there's large gaps. On the example above, being off by 1 degree will leave 1/4" gap on one side.
    That's vertical bandsaw territory to me.

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    Doall made (and I have an instance of) a miter gauge with screw drive - so you set the angle and turn a crank to cut the workpiece. The doall piece is quite heavy - it mounts to the faced holes on the edge of the table.

    This is not frontier stuff - and for these quantities it should work OK. Might want to rig up a large support table so the operator doesn't have to hold up the long piece.

    So yes, Fish On has a point - contouring style vertical bandsaw (doall 2013v3 say...) with some aids....

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    Quote Originally Posted by bryan_machine View Post
    Doall made (and I have an instance of) a miter gauge with screw drive - so you set the angle and turn a crank to cut the workpiece. The doall piece is quite heavy - it mounts to the faced holes on the edge of the table.

    This is not frontier stuff - and for these quantities it should work OK. Might want to rig up a large support table so the operator doesn't have to hold up the long piece.

    So yes, Fish On has a point - contouring style vertical bandsaw (doall 2013v3 say...) with some aids....
    I did a brief Google search and couldn't find anything, do you have a model number or even a picture of this?

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    yes i will hunt up some notes for you - picture most helpful as you likely have to make your own anyway - give me a couple days

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    Quote Originally Posted by Garwood View Post
    Yep. That's pretty much how they all are. I think if the vise and saw both swiveled you would just rotate the entire the entire thing and not cut angle right?

    If you use a vise on a saw to miter angles, even at 45 degrees, you aren't holding onto much and you sure as hell aren't holding onto a shorter part.

    I don't believe there's any way you can make a vise hold parts well at much of an angle in a bandsaw. It just doesn't work. If you need a special angle you are going to be using clamps and guides to get it there. It's easy and you don't need a special saw to do it. Just a creative mind.
    Dunno if I didn't explain well in my first post or...

    The vast majority of horizontal bandsaws (that I have seen) just have swivelling jaws on the vice to set a mitre.

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    4 inch at 20... get a big dragon? A small dragon will do it, but it is limited to hard 4" on the gate, 1/16 bulb on the tube and it will not fit. Bend-Tech Dragon | Product Information

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    I am as cheap ass as they get. If I was doing this and manual was time effective, a vertical bandsaw is the way to go. If I needed it to be automatic, I think rough cut with whatever is fastest, then a swivel vise on a bridgeport with a power feed.

    If the parts were longish, a heavy duty cart shimmed to the exact height of my bandsaw and or bridgeport would come into play.

    For a horizontal bandsaw or cold saw the 20 inch number means such a big saw that cheap is unlikely, to the point I can spend a lot of labor before paying for that saw

    I love my little delta radial arm saw, and I guess you could put an abrasive blade or something on it to do such a thing.
    The previous poster who mentioned them neglected to specify why that brand. Delta and a few others pivot the arm at the center of the arm rather than at the post. This means you can cut these type of shallow angles where it would not be possible on a Sears. The only reason you would need larger than a 10 or 12 is the rail travel. Again, a manual operation but you could get a nice finish cut fairly quickly


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