B&S 2G Feed problem.
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  1. #1
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    Default B&S 2G Feed problem.

    I've had such good luck with the B&S knowledge here that I gotta ask another question.

    A B&S 2G HS (suddenly?) has started having difficulty feeding stock. All the the mechanics seem to be working but when it comes time to close the collet, the drive belt pops off the pulley. I can use the hand wheel to get it through but it takes a lot more torque than it used to. I checked the barrel cam that drives the feeder and collet and everything seems to appear OK. Can't easily check/see the linkages that drive the collet fork. Things look like they're getting lubricated well enough.

    I first found that I needed to adjust the collet ring to reduce the gripping force. I thought I had it because it seem to turn easier but after a few cycles the problem recurs. I had a machinist friend help me to reduce the length of the leather belt by 1/4" but that didn't help -- it seems a bit tighter now than another 2G that I have yet still slips off the pulley.

    Might any of you have some ideas on what I should check next? I can't really expect 60 parts/hr when I have to manually crank to get the stock to feed.

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Try another collet. Degrease the belt. Check that you are not overfeeding too much. Try running the machine with no bar stock.

  3. #3
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    Another thought,how worn are the tracks in the collet closing bearing and the two fulcrum levers in that bearing? If memory serves then there are two pairs of tracks in the bearing,one may not have been used.

  4. #4
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    The collet is adjusted too tight. Back off the adjustment Ring.
    Always adjust it by hand before running under power. It should run with it
    pretty snug. Clean Belt and Pulleys of any oil/grease. Use a spray on Belt traction compound.
    Turn Belt over.

  5. #5
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    Default

    All excellent suggestions. I'll try each out (probably in easiest to execute first order) and report back.

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    We degreased the belt, adjusted the collet (wasn't far off) and flipped the belt. We discovered that we were overfeeding (a lot!). It is no longer throwing the belt but my son thinks it's just barely making it. We had initially tried some belt dressing but we will probably get another can after these adjustments for insurance.

    I'll start looking over the manuals to see how involved it is to reposition (or replace) the slotted collet bearing to see if that will be our next effort.

    Everyone's suggestions are spot on and we appreciated your time y'all take to answer our questions.



    Quote Originally Posted by mc3608 View Post
    The collet is adjusted too tight. Back off the adjustment Ring.
    Always adjust it by hand before running under power. It should run with it
    pretty snug. Clean Belt and Pulleys of any oil/grease. Use a spray on Belt traction compound.
    Turn Belt over.

  7. #7
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    [QUOTE=klpauba;3433900]We degreased the belt, adjusted the collet (wasn't far off) and flipped the belt. We discovered that we were overfeeding (a lot!). It is no longer throwing the belt but my son thinks it's just barely making it. We had initially tried some belt dressing but we will probably get another can after these adjustments for insurance.

    I'll start looking over the manuals to see how involved it is to reposition (or replace) the slotted collet bearing to see if that will be our next effort.

    Everyone's suggestions are spot on and we appreciated your time y'all take to answer our questions.[/QUOTE

    The collet closing bearing is a ten minute job to remove. Just look at it and all becomes clear.

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    Thanks camscan. I was worried it would be more work -- you estimake a ten-minute job it'll take us an hour! :-)

    My son and I went through the maintenance manual and discovered a lubrication tube was severed behind the machine around (but behind) the location of the feed finger. We manually lubed some gears back there and the feed is very smooth and powerful now. No more belt problems.

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    If you are feeding out too long try to feed it out 2 times with shorter lengths. When adjusting the collet tension I use a piece of round bar to open and close it. Adjust to the tightness I feel is needed.

  12. #10
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    Oil the bars it helps the feed fingers to slide when they are feeding stock. Dont feed stock more than 3/8 over feed length.

  13. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by F Spicker View Post
    Oil the bars it helps the feed fingers to slide when they are feeding stock. Dont feed stock more than 3/8 over feed length.
    Never heard of that one. I was always told to wipe the bars to get any protective film off. I can't disagree with you because of that but do you really want the feed finger to slip? On the return stroke certainly but on the forward stroke I think not.
    I agree with you on the over feeding, one of the main problems with length variation.

  14. #12
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    We had a job running 1 1/8 aluminum and we were having trouble with the feed fingers not sliding back after feeding and was throwing the belt. Oiling the bars fixed the feeding.


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