Best Benchtop Lathe - Page 3
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 41 to 60 of 74
  1. #41
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    1,504
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    590
    Likes (Received)
    586

    Default

    What dalmatiangirl is probably getting at it the idea of difficulty having any lathe on casters. Makes it problematic to get/keep the ways untwisted. There’s a few lathes, like a Colchester Chipmaster that can, because of three point mounting be on casters, but then you get into risk of tipping.

    L7

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    BFE Nevada/San Marcos Tx
    Posts
    2,715
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2825
    Likes (Received)
    1739

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tartcha View Post
    Yes, 5” 1500lb ones, but mounted to the sides of the legs or base of brackets, the lathe will sit on leveling feet when in use. I just need to move it every so often to access my air handler, humidifier and hydronic system.
    Hitting some space issues in the garage...
    I've seen a few caster mounted machines that were done well, on a low slung cradle where if a caster failed the machine did not tip. There have been several threads on here involving face planted lathes due to caster failure. 1000 lb, 2000 lb, you cannot lift either, seems to me the effort to move either is the same.

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Country
    UNITED KINGDOM
    Posts
    2,734
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3028
    Likes (Received)
    1686

    Default

    Its a tough choice.
    Something with a name swinging say 13" weighing 1.5 tons odd that bolts to floor or a maximat that uses genuine paper shims to align the headstock from factory

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Victoria, Texas, USA
    Posts
    4,567
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3051
    Likes (Received)
    1242

    Default

    A Wheel arrangement like in this picture would be the best to me. Just a thought.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails lehmann-23.jpg  

  5. Likes M.B. Naegle liked this post
  6. #45
    Join Date
    Feb 2021
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Washington
    Posts
    16
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    Sorry so newbie question, if it sits on threaded leveling feet when in use why are casters a problem, totally get one could break during moving but I may not understand fully.

  7. #46
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Columbia Missouri
    Posts
    903
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    62
    Likes (Received)
    176

    Default

    Some may have missed that the lathe is on threaded feet when in use- and that you plan to level it after each move.

    But...A lathe on a bench or stand is top heavy, and can go over fast. Some caster weight ratings seem to be based on optimism, not engineering. They can fail. It sounds like you will be moving the lathe straight out, so the momentum will be towards you, and on the narrow aspect of the base. If the caster fails, over it comes. OR__ if you hit a stray a stray bolt and the caster stops turning- over it comes.

    You need to think about the way casters are mounted and swivel. Most casters are mounted under what they support so we do not trip over them.

    Here is a 6 inch swivel caster rated for 1200 lbs. McMaster-Carr
    When mounted to the leg of the stand, the swivel point of the caster is 2 3/8 inches inside the edge of the stand (or 3 5/16 if mounted the other way). If the wheel is rotated under the stand, the axle is another 2 1/16 behind that. Lets say you bench is 32 inches deep- about an arms length. If the center of gravity is in the middle, it is 16 inches from the edge of the bench- but the casters contact with the floor is 4 7/16 inboard of that, and only 11 9/16 inches from the center of gravity. If the caster is mounted the other way the axle is inboard by 5 3/8 inches and only 10 5/8 inches from the center of gravity.

    More to think about than it first appears.

  8. Likes geckocycles liked this post
  9. #47
    Join Date
    Feb 2021
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Washington
    Posts
    16
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    Ahh yes, totally agree, I plan on doing the threaded leveling feet in the legs and then the casters outboard (sticking out on the length sides) that should put them 4-6” out of the edge of the lathe. Will not be using cheap amazon ones for this.

  10. #48
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    13,332
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4524
    Likes (Received)
    4798

    Default

    QT the casters outboard (sticking out on the length sides)

    Out at the length ends won't help avoid top-over as well as sticking out at the narrow way.

    Agree at the narrow they are something to trip over.

  11. #49
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    21,070
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    "levelling each time you use it"......Uhm yeah, like that's gonna happen.

    Put it on larger wheels so you could run it while doing 80 mph down I-95....

  12. Likes Demon73 liked this post
  13. #50
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Modesto, CA USA
    Posts
    8,409
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    1592

    Default

    Best benchtop lathe? I would have to say the Rolls Royce of benchtop lathes was made by, Rolls Royce.
    Bill D

    Rolls Royce Lathe

  14. Likes Jim McIntyre liked this post
  15. #51
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Spokane, WA
    Posts
    721
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4
    Likes (Received)
    207

    Default

    Where in the PNW?

    PM me, as I've a couple of possibilities for you.

    jack vines

  16. #52
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    18,885
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    11641

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lucky7 View Post
    ...a few lathes, like a Colchester Chipmaster that can, because of three point mounting be on casters, but then you get into risk of tipping.

    L7
    Not if you apply a fairly common fall-back, no.

    Be it a bar stool, shop stool, large surface plate, or a 10EE... one honours the uber-stable 3-point "plane" but then also..

    ...adds two if not more OTHER points spaced off the deck atop a thin layer of ignorant AIR.. so as to NOT bear ANY load atall "normally", but only allow a silly millimeter of tilt until they DO bear. Some have a spring or a thicker bit of resilient material than the "primary" points.

    Thereby preventing tipping getting any significant head-start ...if one corner of a shop stool / bar stool, large-area surface plate, kitchen or sidewalk bistro two-fer tea table, or a 3-point whilst working lathe is tilted by enough that those "limiter" stop supports come into actual contact.

    Not rocket science to put into effect.

    Not a hazard to accuracy, either.

    Not until some well-meaning person ignorant of their true purpose comes along and tries to shim or adjust the "backup" anti-dis-assed-her topple-over-preventer points ... as if they were MEANT to be equal players in sharing the load!

    Which they are NOT.


  17. #53
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    13,332
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4524
    Likes (Received)
    4798

    Default

    I don't know if this has been mentioned but the through-hole can be important for a short/any lathe.
    Doing gun work the front sight may not fit through a small headstock bore, and the barrel length may be too long for between centers or in a steady.
    Plus be sure you have the thread choice you think you may need.

  18. #54
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    peekskill, NY
    Posts
    26,586
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    6032

    Default

    Trouble with casters is, well, they 'caster.' When you pull an item forwards (say, away from a wall) the wheels caster to the rear. Lathes (southbends in particular) tend to be front heavy anyway. With the legs swung to the back it doen't take much floor debris or irregularity to 'trip up' the rig, and tip it over on the front.

    Make the caster base larger in area? "Oh no, we're trying to *save* room by shuffling shit around in the shop..."

  19. #55
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    18,885
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    11641

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jim rozen View Post
    Trouble with casters is, well, they 'caster.' When you pull an item forwards (say, away from a wall) the wheels caster to the rear. Lathes (southbends in particular) tend to be front heavy anyway. With the legs swung to the back it doen't take much floor debris or irregularity to 'trip up' the rig, and tip it over on the front.

    Make the caster base larger in area? "Oh no, we're trying to *save* room by shuffling shit around in the shop..."
    Casters routinely as sunshine in summertime fail in two "main" ways. The wheel sheds a "tire" off the hub or at a two-type of material bond line.
    From side force.

    Or the usually sheet-steel "body" collapses to one side. Also from side force.

    Machinery skates not aligned with the desired direction of travel, OTOH?
    JF SIT there. Stubbornly reminding you they ain't budging until YOU intentionally point 'em a-purpose.

    The negotiated compromise on my mill and shaper is to fix-mount the buggers close to center mass like an oxcart or the paddle wheels on a high-manueverability sidewheel steamboat that can spin any direction sitting still in its own length OR whilst in-motion.

    THEN all I have to do is slack the front-side jackscrews to unload the arse-side cross bar, lower the machine onto the Vestil 10K multi-roller with swivel top plate.. and tug it about like a nosewheel aircraft on a ramp.

    No real risk.

    Even if it wants to tip? Those leveling jackscrews are only slacked to under a tenth of an inch off the deck, 90%+ of my nice flat floor.

    10EE's are similar on three-point skates their pivot bolt also the leveling jackscrew via some simple washers and multiple-nut foo.

    I'm VERY badly flocked only if ever I get one near the built-in 4-inch drop downramp just inside the 18-foot roll-up door. Ergo I do not!

    Otherwise safe as moving a grand piano on THEIR special carriers. AFTER sweeping the floor.

    Of course.

    Been "on my head", first-year of production Corvair. Before Ralph Nader was yet assembled from a kinderfartrun class pooling the toys outta the squad's cracker-jack boxen. Or maybe it were the caramelized peanuts and congenital opportunism?

    Back injury from an early age onward kinda makes a believer outta yah as to the potential for unexpected consequences of tripping over what had been thought to be but the silliest of trivia. And was not trivial ENOUGH.

    See also M-151 suicide bad roll kit, 1/4 ton 4X4, crossbreed between the Devil and Hun-ery Ford's as revenge for his beloved Weird Adolf loosing the war. First gen had the same penchant for wheel tuck-under as the early Corvair had.

    Both got at least an improvement, if not a full fix.

    Injured stayed injured. Dead stayed dead. Metal stayed scrapped.

    Not a situation as needs further statistical proofs, is it?

    Go though and start WISER!

    Casters are for beans or kvetching fish that got away.

  20. #56
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    peekskill, NY
    Posts
    26,586
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    6032

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Casters routinely as sunshine in summertime fail in two "main" ways. The wheel sheds a "tire" off the hub or at a two-type of material bond line.
    From side force.

    Or the usually sheet-steel "body" collapses to one side. Also from side force.
    ....
    Point being, it's usually not a caster failure. It's a design flaw, built into the concept of 'we need to keep it all tiny and compact because we don't have enough
    room to put stuff because the shop is too small and we can make it bigger by shuffling things around on wheels.' And the design for where to put the casters
    suffers the problem mentioned above. Push it one way, it tends to tip that way. Push it the other, it tends to tip the other way. One way tends to tip over on
    the face of the lathe because of the natural heavy front of those things.

    Lathes belong on the floor. Stop putting to much stuff in the shop. This solves the problem at the start of it.

  21. #57
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Washington
    Posts
    347
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    97
    Likes (Received)
    98

    Default

    Sometimes you just have to take it apart to move it. The dreaded H.F. car dollies work well for individual lathe parts, as long as they are securely strapped on.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 20170123_150200.jpg  

  22. #58
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    18,885
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    11641

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jim rozen View Post
    Point being, it's usually not a caster failure. It's a design flaw, built into the concept of 'we need to keep it all tiny and compact because we don't have enough
    room to put stuff because the shop is too small and we can make it bigger by shuffling things around on wheels.' And the design for where to put the casters
    suffers the problem mentioned above. Push it one way, it tends to tip that way. Push it the other, it tends to tip the other way. One way tends to tip over on
    the face of the lathe because of the natural heavy front of those things.

    Lathes belong on the floor. Stop putting to much stuff in the shop. This solves the problem at the start of it.
    LOL! Look who is kvetching about "space"!

    "TDS" hadn't given DJT rent-free space in your HEAD for the rest of your days? Sized to cover the needs of a whole dam' 36-hole dual-redundant golf course and holiday resort with a casino?

    You would have enough spare space to house YOUR bikes, Jay Leno's wheels collection ... and still be able to TiG weld an entire Graf Spee class dirigible airframe in one go!


  23. #59
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    18,885
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    11641

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by morestainless View Post
    Sometimes you just have to take it apart to move it. The dreaded H.F. car dollies work well for individual lathe parts, as long as they are securely strapped on.
    Got more than a dozen of those HF "furniture" dolly thingies. A few more, yet of better vendor all steel ones, larger. Heaviest loads are one-each Reliance motor or a K&T milling head, or K&T slotter. Burke mill and the pantoengraver dont weigh much atall.

    But for the 10EE's and the "real mill". No Fine WAY I would use casters!

    I use these on the uber-flat concrete:

    3300 lb skate

    These on either that or the asphalt of the driveway:

    4400 lb skate

    And a Vestil 10,000 lb-rated multi-roller swivel-top skate with towbar. For steering. Two Vestil 5,000 pry dolly do the gross shifts. Pair of toe/combo jacks, pair of trolley jacks. Handful of bottle & scissors jacks, collection of wedges, pry bars, and pinch bars, all sizes, plenty of shims, straps, other cordage, chains, chainfalls, chain hooks, clevises, other accessories, both hand and electric winches, electric hoist too.

    I didn't buy it all in the same year.
    Took annual half-price promo and such. i'm on Northern's premium "free shipping" plan. it saves me money. Plenty of it!

    Almost NONE of it bought "used" though.

    Strap get used ONCE. Inspected, downgraded. Seldom sees a third go.
    I've chikn'd-out and bought NEW arredy. Chan get's checked as well. Chain is cheaper by the full tub from a supply house than by-the-foot at Big Box, BTW. And you can get better-grade chain for the money. Do NOT skimp on clevises, links, loops, hooks, couplers, eye-bolts, EITHER! Not At ALL!

    Cheap s**t right there is where you break stuff ever' dam' time.

    They say life is cheap? Mine sure TF is not!

    Supply and demand thing. Got less of life still in inventory? Back-orders nor refunds not accepted? No refills in stock? Even a fine Wife can only do but so much rebuild?

    Price of the dwindling stock of "life" remaining goes UP. Not DOWN!



    BTW: The Vestil goods aren't really any better than the Northern goods.

    Northern is good enough. H-F they were never. I just do not do rigging OFTEN enough to wear them out. Can't really justify Hilmans or the best German-made ones a full-time pro would use, EITHER.

    Owning the mostly-Northern menagerie, outright, has proved cheaper than renting. And waaay safer and more convenient. If only because I KNOW I HAVE IT on any given short-notice day or minute.

    And I know if some prior a-ho has abused the gear! Or NOT!

  24. Likes morestainless liked this post
  25. #60
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Walla Walla Wine and Wild Turkey
    Posts
    5,417
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    22
    Likes (Received)
    693

    Default

    termite, you have never made a thing on your junk broke down Monarchs, or your dumb ass Burke mill.
    And again you are sitting on top of a dead thread, because of your addiction to post and tell bullshit stories "in others threads".
    You have constantly lied about you background, and bullied off the forum very knowledgeable machinist, whose only crime is calling BS on you entire troll act.
    But, in a self destructive act, that defies explanation, you stupidly decided to attack me, a working professional, that is simply not going to back down from a worthless piece of shit like you, or your dwindling friends.
    just an update, the termite studies continue.

  26. Likes dfloen liked this post

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •