Best Benchtop Lathe - Page 4
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 234
Results 61 to 74 of 74
  1. #61
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Webster Groves, MO
    Posts
    7,987
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2077
    Likes (Received)
    3902

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill D View Post
    Best benchtop lathe? I would have to say the Rolls Royce of benchtop lathes was made by, Rolls Royce.
    Bill D

    Rolls Royce Lathe
    Notice that in the picture showing a tool bit in the holder, the bit, which looks like a threading tool, is mounted upside down. That would allow the operator to see the threads as they are cut and also would allow starting at a shoulder and cutting away from it.

    Bill

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New York
    Posts
    821
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    565
    Likes (Received)
    441

    Default

    Best bench lathe? SB 9A or 10K. The ORIGINAL ones.

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    19,112
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    11682

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pavt View Post
    Best bench lathe? SB 9A or 10K. The ORIGINAL ones.
    ?? WTF?? Must have been inspired by one of the missing verses in the book of Genesis?

    "And God made sheep shit attractive to horseflies so man could enjoy watermelon in peace."

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Sacramento County, California
    Posts
    4,336
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2781
    Likes (Received)
    1670

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    ?? WTF?? Must have been inspired by one of the missing verses in the book of Genesis?

    "And God made sheep shit attractive to horseflies so man could enjoy watermelon in peace."
    Yes, and if the Ovine waste can somehow be maintained in a corner, for example, the flies will be bunched in one area, making for a more completely fly-free enjoyment of the melon.

    I do recall that the last boss that I had in an office setting was very partial to Ovine and Bovine waste as that was mostly what I heard coming out of his mouth.

    i am hoping for more helpful suggestions fro you in the near future.


  5. #65
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    1,518
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    592
    Likes (Received)
    587

    Default

    Actually, I don’t think a South Bend v-belt 9A is a bad lathe for bench top situation. Before you pile on the derision hear me out. Cheap to buy and easy to find, cheap to get spare parts- and parts are easily available, spindle thread is common and tooling easy to get and use. One person can lift the easily stripped down parts and move in a car.

    Is it a lathe like an Emco, Schaublin, Hardinge, or even one of the smaller Colchesters? No. Doesn’t pretend to be. Based on a few hours of use, if I could find an Emco Maximat 11, that would be a better lathe for a bench top, but they’re not common here- South Bends are easy to find.

    For a persons first lathe in a basement or garage ask yourself, would you be better off with no lathe, or a South Bend 9A? I think I was lucky to grow up with a 9C in the basement. As soon as I had my own place a one owner 9A followed me home. Thirty years later I now have other, nicer lathes (bigger and smaller), a nice shop, but won’t sell the 9A. Too handy for small quick jobs. Also a good lathe to have for a newbie to try out and learn under my supervision.


    L7

  6. Likes Asquith liked this post
  7. #66
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    peekskill, NY
    Posts
    26,627
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    6048

    Default

    The single big drawback to the 9A southbend is the rear-mounted drive unit. It makes the bench very deep. Basically the minimum reasonable depth for that, given a flat belt of any reasonable length is four feet. It's nearly a square bench. The undeneath drive lathes fit in a much shallower space.

    Nobody's mentioned the TH54 lathe yet. Not a bad bench lathe, the upstairs drive makes the bench a good deal shallower.... first photo below was my first lathe, 1932 version.

    Atlas 9-inch lathe

  8. #67
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Australia (Hobart)
    Posts
    4,012
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    618
    Likes (Received)
    3210

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lucky7 View Post
    For a persons first lathe in a basement or garage ask yourself, would you be better off with no lathe, or a South Bend 9A? I think I was lucky to grow up with a 9C in the basement. As soon as I had my own place a one owner 9A followed me home. Thirty years later I now have other, nicer lathes (bigger and smaller), a nice shop, but won’t sell the 9A. Too handy for small quick jobs.
    Ummm, the Maximat 11 IS the lathe I use for the small, quick jobs.

    Same work envelope, need more/faster metal removal, Chipmaster.

    Otherwise the job goes in the Monarch CY.

    I'd rather have a South Bend than no lathe, but I'd rather have almost any other lathe than a South Bend.

    Well maybe not a Myford...

    PDW

  9. #68
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    21,180
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jim rozen View Post

    Nobody's mentioned the TH54 lathe yet. Not a bad bench lathe, the upstairs drive makes the bench a good deal shallower.... first photo below was my first lathe, 1932 version.

    Atlas 9-inch lathe
    Maybe because they
    "follow the rules" not like liberatards....That think rules don't apply to them....

    "Also not allowed for discussions on PM now-

    *Atlas/ Craftsman/Dunlap products - anywhere"

  10. #69
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Parker, CO
    Posts
    45
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    3

    Default

    WOW!Never heard of air bearings

  11. #70
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    21,180
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by geckocycles View Post
    WOW!Never heard of air bearings
    Ampex 2" wide VTR's used them on the head.

  12. #71
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Oregon
    Posts
    2,664
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    630
    Likes (Received)
    804

    Default

    "Well maybe not a Myford..."

    I read somewhere that Myfords have cast iron bearings. I'd want replaceable bronze at the very least, so my vote between the two would be SB, or any of the higher quality Asian lathes with rolling contact bearings.

    Having said that I admit that bearings bored in CI will last a very long time if kept oiled.

  13. #72
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Australia (Hobart)
    Posts
    4,012
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    618
    Likes (Received)
    3210

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by partsproduction View Post
    "Well maybe not a Myford..."

    I read somewhere that Myfords have cast iron bearings. I'd want replaceable bronze at the very least, so my vote between the two would be SB, or any of the higher quality Asian lathes with rolling contact bearings.

    Having said that I admit that bearings bored in CI will last a very long time if kept oiled.
    Thing is, Myfords had beautiful build quality in a shitty, flimsy, flexible design with a smaller work envelope than a small SB.

    I'd take pretty much any of the Taiwanese built 12x24 or 12x36 lathes over any Myford or SB. Maybe except the Heavy 10 but even that'd be a close call.

    But - if it involves fiddly features on something less than say 3mm or preferably 6mm diameter, I'm not interested. For people who do fine teeny tiny work the Myford might be a much better fit. I know I prefer working on my Emco to my Monarch, or the baby toolroom HBM to its big brother.

    PDW

  14. #73
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    19,112
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    11682

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Walla Walla Whining Wild Turdkey, small-d, the COVID-orphaned drama-Queen
    But, in a self destructive act, that defies explanation, you stupidly decided to attack me, a working professional cock-roach, that is simply not going to back down from a worthless piece of shit like you, or your dwindling friends.
    just an update, the termite studies continue.
    ROFL!

    No damned WONDER you are so bleedin' paranoid!
    Your "termite studies" twigged to it yet, have they?

    Termites likely evolved from cockroaches - Futurity

    In the ancient game of "go"?

    "You are surrounded!"

    ......by OTHER cucarachas!

    La cucaracha - Gipsy Kings - YouTube

    Yah Senile-Silly Wuckfit!

  15. #74
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    19,112
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    11682

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by geckocycles View Post
    WOW!Never heard of air bearings
    Probably never heard of ball bearing mousetraps, either but they are one of the original designs, and in-use loooong before humankind yet existed.

    Modern times, we call a ball-bearing mousetrap a "tomcat"



Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •