Best crimper for uninsulated terminals - Page 4
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  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by EPAIII View Post
    Precisely!

    Another great example of a well engineered connection system is the 66 punch down terminal block that is used in almost every wired telephone installation in the country, if not the world. They are dead cheap.

    Amazon.com : SIEMON 66 Punch Down 50 Pair Wiring Terminal Block for Telephone Phone 66M1-50 : Everything Else

    The terminals consist of a simple Vee slit in a somewhat springy metal post. The wire used is plain, solid copper which is insulated but not tinned so not much protection against corrosion there. They are installed everywhere from inside skyscrapers to short posts in someone's back yard with only a slip on cover to protect them against falling rain. Indoors they normally have no covers.

    The installation tool is dead simple and cheap. And their connections last for years and years after being punched together by fairly unskilled workers.

    They do produce a gas tight connection. Gas tight between the wire and the inside of that slit in the terminal. Again, not obvious to casual observation.

    How good are they? I have used them for both control systems and for professional, broadcast audio with zero problems. Many digital circuits also pass through these 66 blocks, but not where you would normally see them.
    Then why are scotchloks so terrible? that's the same pricniple isn't it? Or does stranded wire make the difference?

  2. #62
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    MY electrical engineer neighbor said the power companies used special crimpers for the splices. ratcheting type but the only way to release them was to complete the crimp down to the factory set limit then they could be released. No way could a worker wimp out and not crimp down all the way.
    He also said when he started in the 1940's workers spent hours draw filing copper bus bars to be flat, smooth, bright and shiny before clamping them together. At some point they realized it did not matter as long as they were clean enough.
    Bill D

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by EPAIII View Post
    Insulated terminals are garbage? Really?
    In short? YES! Period.

    It takes a lot of pressure to create a proper crimp. One that has zero to minimal space for oxygen intrusion.
    There is no "plastic" than can hold up to these pressures.

    The way I crimp is just as good as solder. I cringe every time I see somebody crimping plastic, or using that spot on the crimp-pliers.
    Will it work? Probably. Longevity? Hell no. Especially in certain climates.

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by jim rozen View Post
    Second best is heat shrink over the crimp, going up a bit over the cable.

    My approach for mission critical stuff on my vehicles is: Crimp, flow solder into the crimp (again proving they're not gas tight) and then heat shrink over the nylon
    insulator and up the cable for a suitable length. The wire insulation tends to be teflon so it can take the heat of soldering, the nylon insulators hold up at temps as well.

    And no I don't have the wire fail where the solder wicks up the stranded conductors a bit. Never seen that.
    I have cut apart a TON of soldered crimps. What I have found is:
    If properly crimped? Solder will not flow in to the crimp.
    If not properly crimped? If the wire/terminal had no flux pre-crimp, solder will not flow in to the crimp "adequately".

    The art is this: get the crimp as tight as possible without compromising the individual strands where they enter the terminal.
    Don't crimp right at the edge. Crimp as far "in to" the terminal as you can without compromising that end.
    If you crimp right on the edge of the wire end of the terminal, expect broken strands.
    Crimping is definitely an art. Plenty of failures have taught me the nuances, LOL. Since I have homed my technique in? Zero failures.

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brett W View Post
    I have never understood crimping the terminals with the shrink wrap over them. Seems like you would pinch the shrink wrap and defeat the purpose of the insulation after the fact.

    It does not.
    The plastic, crimp ferrule and crimper anvils are all engineered to work together to make a sound crimp with the integrity of the plastic sheath maintained.
    And we are talking small work- not 4/0..

    Get set up with this gear and you will never look/go back to snipping little bits of shrink wrap tube to try to watertite your work.
    I will crimp up some and do a show an tell when I get a break- late next week the way this damn job is going lol...

    Now- take an idiot- send him into a auto parts store and he will buy the wrong crimpers, the wrong lugs and go to town.
    The cheap plastic cover will split and get sort of mashed into the crimp but does he care (or notice..) - hell no.
    Years later you look at the work and shake your head as you cut it all out for a redo...

    Lots of fires on boats start at the shore power connection.
    Corrosion plus amps plus time- temps run up as and resistance spikes and you get a neat little camp fire in the FRP shell which usually spreads to the wood hull liners.
    This usually happens in the fall when folk put high amp space heaters on the boats to push back winterizing the boat.
    The power connectors are the worse offenders of ac stuff on a boat- just a bit of foam gasket to hull shell and fished down through coamings so cables are just sort of hanging swinging in the wind.

    Any crimp work around the gen sets or engine get shaken so cable work has to be done right at crimps and be well supported.
    Battery box work is the worse kind of mess in old lead acid and the rest of the boat subject to salt water, salt air and general damp...
    The crimps and gear for this service work.

    Looking back- the first contract I ever took in marine was a full rewire from the bank up in an old Oyster 39.
    I set up for the work back then and I can't see that much has changed except the willingness of boat owners to use lamp wire, cheap auto crimpers and welding cables for the heavy stuff..
    In case if anyone is not aware- all conductors used on a boat are tinned stranded copper.
    They STILL rot if not properly protected at the crimp.

    I believe this whole discussion is taking the wrong tack- crimp work does not fail in the crimp, it fails at the crimp in the conductor just at the crimp ferrule or further up in the strand under the cut insulation.
    All this talk of gas tight inside the crimp ferrule is sort of missing the point if the exposed loose conductor strand is left just hanging out there...
    Last edited by Trboatworks; 09-24-2021 at 07:27 AM.

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  7. #66
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    There's a secret about connectors inside vehicles:

    They're there for ease of manufacturability. Motorcycles, boats, cars, whatever.

    My rule is, if I'm in there fixing something involving a connector that's gone bad, and the connector never
    needs to come apart for normal use or to maintain the think, the connector just gets cut out, the wires
    lap-spliced together with solder, with heat-shrink tubing over them.

    Bonus points if you remember to put the heat-shrink on before you splice the wires!

  8. #67
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    Tr- which connectors do you recommend? I have a large assortment of the type in my original post for machines, but I am a boat owner and have no qualms spending more money there to get the best stuff available.

    -Cole

    Sent from my SM-G981V using Tapatalk

  9. #68
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    I use Ancor both wire and terminals/lugs.
    Mostly because they dominate the on the shelf inventory at local chandleries where I have accounts:

    Home | Ancor


    Back when I was doing lots of marine electrical contracts I had an account with ETF and they were providing essentially the same gear in different brands for like a quarter of the cost.
    I forget what brands those were.

    This guy covers it better than I can (or would bother to..):

    Marine Wire Termination - Marine How To

  10. #69
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    That's a good discussion. Makes me want to go out and buy more (better) crimp tools!


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